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James
October 2nd 07, 02:49 AM
Over a year ago I got furry pets for the first time in my life partly
because I heard it some times helps lower blood pressure. Even though
I sleep with my cat and spend a lot of time with rabbits my pressure
did not get lower.

Anyone have better results?

honeybunch
October 2nd 07, 03:42 AM
You have to walk 2 hours a day to lower your blood pressure so get a
dog for that.

On Oct 1, 9:49 pm, James > wrote:
> Over a year ago I got furry pets for the first time in my life partly
> because I heard it some times helps lower blood pressure. Even though
> I sleep with my cat and spend a lot of time with rabbits my pressure
> did not get lower.
>
> Anyone have better results?

October 2nd 07, 05:57 AM
In article . com>,
James > wrote:

> Over a year ago I got furry pets for the first time in my life partly
> because I heard it some times helps lower blood pressure. Even though
> I sleep with my cat and spend a lot of time with rabbits my pressure
> did not get lower.
>
> Anyone have better results?

A lot of what passes for health "news" is minor notability, elevated to
fad status. There certainly are studies reliably demonstrating that pets
do temporarily reduce *stress-related* increases in blood pressure, but
pets are no match for the physical stress people put on their own hearts
and circulatory systems. A cat can't clear the cholesterol from clogged
arteries. No dog will repair the damage and scarring caused by repeated
inhalation of toxic smoke. A fish tank or bird can't ameliorate the
effects of genetic inheritance.

What a good pet really can do is what pets in general are terrific at:
making life worth living, giving temporary relief from BP stress spikes
and imbuing their owners with a lot of good reasons to take care of
their bodies. Anyone with a pet knew this already. The studies just
confirmed their suspicions and gave lazy journalists gee-whiz,
holistically-fluffy, space-filling stories to write.

Meghan Noecker
October 2nd 07, 08:17 AM
On Mon, 01 Oct 2007 18:49:52 -0700, James >
wrote:

>Over a year ago I got furry pets for the first time in my life partly
>because I heard it some times helps lower blood pressure. Even though
>I sleep with my cat and spend a lot of time with rabbits my pressure
>did not get lower.
>
>Anyone have better results?


It lowers it at times and may give you a better average. BUt it won't
lower it all the time.

I get nervous at the doctor's office, so I always get a lecture on
high blood pressure since it is on the line for high. This year, when
they took my blood pressure, I pictured Jay Jay's cute fluffy face.
The nurse told me my blood pressure was really good and moved on to
the next thing.

Worked quite well for me :)

cybercat
October 2nd 07, 07:27 PM
> wrote
> What a good pet really can do is what pets in general are terrific at:
> making life worth living, giving temporary relief from BP stress spikes
> and imbuing their owners with a lot of good reasons to take care of
> their bodies. Anyone with a pet knew this already.

The thing is, I think you have to love them. I don't think you can just
pick one up with the same feeling you have for your bp pills.

CatNipped[_2_]
October 2nd 07, 08:18 PM
"James" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Over a year ago I got furry pets for the first time in my life partly
> because I heard it some times helps lower blood pressure. Even though
> I sleep with my cat and spend a lot of time with rabbits my pressure
> did not get lower.
>
> Anyone have better results?

If you read my posts about Archer you'll see that my cats are *giving* me
high blood pressure! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

dgk
October 4th 07, 01:09 PM
On Mon, 1 Oct 2007 23:04:11 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>Lifestyle changes
> a.. Don't smoke cigarettes or use any tobacco product.
> b.. Lose weight if you're overweight.
> c.. Exercise regularly.
> d.. Eat a healthy diet that includes lots of fruits and vegetables and is
>low in fat.
> e.. Limit your sodium, alcohol and caffeine intake.
....
> Park in the Outer Mongolia of the parking lot. All you need is an extra
>4,000 to 5,000 steps a day and you could lower your blood pressure 11
>points! At least, that's what researchers from the University of Tennessee
>found when they tracked postmenopausal women.
>

Lots of good advice, but hey, 4,000 to 5,000 steps? Figuring only two
feet per step, that's closing in on two miles. Big parking lot!

I don't need to worry about that. I commute by bike for the most part,
around 30 miles per day. I just need to worry about getting run over
by a taxi.