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RPSinha
October 3rd 07, 06:31 PM
We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
(she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
pick her up!)

Questions:

1. At this age do they get kitten food or adult?

2. What is the approximate right amount? Are two small cans or one
large one too little, about right, or too much?

3. So far we have been using old stock left by a friend who moved
overseas with their cats, but is there an outright best value
recommendation among various brands?

4. On that note, the cans we have are about 6 months old. Is that ok or
too old?

We are newbies and appreciate all advice. Thanks.

Hactar
October 3rd 07, 08:07 PM
In article >, RPSinha <Nobody> wrote:
> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
> pick her up!)
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. At this age do they get kitten food or adult?

Check the can/bag. It should say.

> 4. On that note, the cans we have are about 6 months old. Is that ok or
> too old?

6 months past the "use by" date, I'm thinking so. 6 months past the
manufacturing date but not past the "use by" date, no. No "use by"
date, got me.

--
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing? [TOFU := text oben,
A: Top-posting. followup unten]
Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet? -- Daniel Jensen

Ted Davis[_2_]
October 3rd 07, 09:35 PM
On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 17:31:34 +0000, RPSinha wrote:

> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about 10
> month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her (she is
> friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we pick her
> up!)
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. At this age do they get kitten food or adult?

The kitten food people say one year for kitten food; the cat food people
say feed their stuff from the beginning.

>
> 2. What is the approximate right amount? Are two small cans or one large
> one too little, about right, or too much?

That depends on the food value of the food, and the weight and activity
level of the cat, and also on the weather for outdoor cats. Most cats
won't overeat, so if she leaves a bit, that's probably about the right
amount.
>
> 3. So far we have been using old stock left by a friend who moved
> overseas with their cats, but is there an outright best value
> recommendation among various brands?

Best value? That's as much emotional as anything else. I have fifteen
cats - cost and quality are both important, and I have settled on
Walmart's house brand (Special Kitty) kibble as the main feed. I have to
feed Spooky some canned food because he has lost enough teeth (he's very
old) to make it difficult for him to eat dry kibble - I use another
chain's house brand (Best Choice), but not any varieties with wheat or
wheat products in them (wheat is not so good for cats).

If the cat thrives, the food is good enough. Otherwise, otherwise.

>
> 4. On that note, the cans we have are about 6 months old. Is that ok or
> too old?

Canned food, human and other, is usually good for at least two years from
manufacture.

--
T.E.D. )

William Graham
October 3rd 07, 09:46 PM
"RPSinha" > wrote in message
...
> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
> pick her up!)
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. At this age do they get kitten food or adult?
>
> 2. What is the approximate right amount? Are two small cans or one
> large one too little, about right, or too much?
>
> 3. So far we have been using old stock left by a friend who moved
> overseas with their cats, but is there an outright best value
> recommendation among various brands?
>
> 4. On that note, the cans we have are about 6 months old. Is that ok or
> too old?
>
> We are newbies and appreciate all advice. Thanks.

At 10 months, they can eat regular canned cat food and/or dry kibbles....I
usually give mine both.....They always have kibbles available (an infinite
supply) and I give them the canned if they come into the kitchen and "ask"
for it. One feral male likes chopped roasted chicken, and it is almost as
cheap as cat food, so he gets it a lot. But they all eat the kibbles in a
pinch, and when we go on vacation they survive fine on kibbles and
water......

studio
October 4th 07, 06:48 AM
You also didn't quite make it clear as to the sex of the cat?
Is it really a "her"?
>From my experience females don't eat quite as much and
usually weigh less.

I feed my girl 1 can of Fancy Feast 6 times per week,
(I make her fast 1 day per week off the wet food)
she likes and has tried all the vareities...then,
Iams, Purina, Whiskas, or other kibbles, for the most part,
as much as she wants...and don't forget clean clear water.

She only gets hairball formula kibbles in the summer when she sheds,
and she gets a new batch of oat-grass I grow her every 6 weeks.

She grazes the oat grass constantly, and I am firm believer
in it's healthy benefits.
She purrs while eating it, so it must be good.

She is 14 years old now and still in good shape, so I hope I'm
doing something right.
She doesn't like people food at all...except for the occassional
piece of wheat bread or very small piece of blue cheese.

Spider
October 4th 07, 02:19 PM
"RPSinha" > wrote in message
...
> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
> pick her up!)
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. At this age do they get kitten food or adult?
>
> 2. What is the approximate right amount? Are two small cans or one
> large one too little, about right, or too much?
>
> 3. So far we have been using old stock left by a friend who moved
> overseas with their cats, but is there an outright best value
> recommendation among various brands?
>
> 4. On that note, the cans we have are about 6 months old. Is that ok or
> too old?
>
> We are newbies and appreciate all advice. Thanks.



Hi,

Having read your OP and replies, I find I have no quarrel with the replies
you've received. However, I am a little concerned that you are feeding a
"neighbourhood cat". Is this a (possibly starving) feral cat, or a
neighbour's cat who is otherwise cared for?

I confess I should not be pleased if I learned that a neighbour were feeding
my cat. What if that cat is on a special diet? ... abstaining from food
prior to an operation?... already had an operation and needing
vetinary-specified food?

Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to suggest that
you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're helping a
known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero. You
obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.

When you're feeding puss, don't forget the importance of fresh water.

Regards,
Spider

RPSinha
October 4th 07, 03:40 PM
Spider > wrote:

: Having read your OP and replies, I find I have no quarrel with the replies
: you've received. However, I am a little concerned that you are feeding a
: "neighbourhood cat". Is this a (possibly starving) feral cat, or a
: neighbour's cat who is otherwise cared for?

She doesn't have a collar and no owner I can figure out. She also has a
very free schedule. She comes around at all sort of hours. She has
stayed in our home anywhere from 1/2 hr (eat and leave) to 8-10 hrs
(sleep). Sometimes she doesn't come for a few days.

Usually she lets us know she wants to eat by aggressively trying to get
into the cupboards (she has seen us get the cans from there). Similarly
when she wants to leave she makes commotion to attract attention and
then leads us towards the door.

By the manner in which she eats and finishes food, see seems genuinely
hungry. She can finish one small 3oz can without problem. Sometimes she
does want more but can only eat a little of the second can. If she does
eat a lot from the second can, she may throw up. That is why I had
asked how much food is good for her.

I do put water out but she rarely touches it.

Dan Espen
October 4th 07, 03:53 PM
"Spider" > writes:

> "RPSinha" > wrote in message
> ...
>> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
>> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
>> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
>> pick her up!)
....
> Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to suggest that
> you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're helping a
> known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero. You
> obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.

It's not that great.
If you feed a feral that's not altered
you're creating at least 10 ferals in just the first year.
Do the math.

William Graham
October 4th 07, 05:03 PM
"Dan Espen" > wrote in message
...
> "Spider" > writes:
>
>> "RPSinha" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
>>> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
>>> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
>>> pick her up!)
> ...
>> Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to suggest
>> that
>> you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're helping a
>> known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero. You
>> obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.
>
> It's not that great.
> If you feed a feral that's not altered
> you're creating at least 10 ferals in just the first year.
> Do the math.

Unfortunately, you get exactly ZERO help in solving this problem from either
cat coalitions or aspca organizations. And I don't mean financial help. I
mean they won't lift a finger to help you trap a cat, or arrange in any way
to get one fixed.....They just want to sit and wait for you to capture them
and bring them to the vet for fixing.....As long as this is the case, there
will be many millions of feral cats born every year, most of whom will
starve to death. The problem is that you are afraid that if you catch one
and get it fixed, he/she will leave and you will never see him again. (I
certainly would if someone were to catch me in a trap and get me fixed)

Dan Espen
October 4th 07, 07:56 PM
"William Graham" > writes:

> "Dan Espen" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Spider" > writes:
>>
>>> "RPSinha" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is about
>>>> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
>>>> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
>>>> pick her up!)
>> ...
>>> Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to suggest
>>> that
>>> you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're helping a
>>> known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero. You
>>> obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.
>>
>> It's not that great.
>> If you feed a feral that's not altered
>> you're creating at least 10 ferals in just the first year.
>> Do the math.
>
> Unfortunately, you get exactly ZERO help in solving this problem from either
> cat coalitions or aspca organizations. And I don't mean financial help. I
> mean they won't lift a finger to help you trap a cat, or arrange in any way
> to get one fixed.....They just want to sit and wait for you to capture them
> and bring them to the vet for fixing.....As long as this is the case, there
> will be many millions of feral cats born every year, most of whom will
> starve to death. The problem is that you are afraid that if you catch one
> and get it fixed, he/she will leave and you will never see him again. (I
> certainly would if someone were to catch me in a trap and get me fixed)

I've read this from you before.
Fear is the enemy.

You know what's right, do the right thing.

Cats don't hold grudges anyway.

William Graham
October 4th 07, 11:07 PM
"Dan Espen" > wrote in message
...
> "William Graham" > writes:
>
>> "Dan Espen" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Spider" > writes:
>>>
>>>> "RPSinha" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is
>>>>> about
>>>>> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
>>>>> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
>>>>> pick her up!)
>>> ...
>>>> Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to suggest
>>>> that
>>>> you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're helping
>>>> a
>>>> known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero. You
>>>> obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.
>>>
>>> It's not that great.
>>> If you feed a feral that's not altered
>>> you're creating at least 10 ferals in just the first year.
>>> Do the math.
>>
>> Unfortunately, you get exactly ZERO help in solving this problem from
>> either
>> cat coalitions or aspca organizations. And I don't mean financial help. I
>> mean they won't lift a finger to help you trap a cat, or arrange in any
>> way
>> to get one fixed.....They just want to sit and wait for you to capture
>> them
>> and bring them to the vet for fixing.....As long as this is the case,
>> there
>> will be many millions of feral cats born every year, most of whom will
>> starve to death. The problem is that you are afraid that if you catch one
>> and get it fixed, he/she will leave and you will never see him again. (I
>> certainly would if someone were to catch me in a trap and get me fixed)
>
> I've read this from you before.
> Fear is the enemy.
>
> You know what's right, do the right thing.
>
> Cats don't hold grudges anyway.

My, "doing the right thing" ....Or not, doesn't address the problem as I
have outlined it. It is just your personalization of the problem, and it
only begs the question.....If you want to help, then address the issue, and
leave my situation out of it.

Try to think of the millions of cats that starve to death every year, and
not my one cat. - Perhaps that might help you to concentrate on the general
issue.

Dan Espen
October 5th 07, 02:37 AM
"William Graham" > writes:

> "Dan Espen" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "William Graham" > writes:
>>
>>> "Dan Espen" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> "Spider" > writes:
>>>>
>>>>> "RPSinha" > wrote in message
>>>>> ...
>>>>>> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is
>>>>>> about
>>>>>> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh her
>>>>>> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if we
>>>>>> pick her up!)
>>>> ...
>>>>> Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to suggest
>>>>> that
>>>>> you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're helping
>>>>> a
>>>>> known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero. You
>>>>> obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.
>>>>
>>>> It's not that great.
>>>> If you feed a feral that's not altered
>>>> you're creating at least 10 ferals in just the first year.
>>>> Do the math.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, you get exactly ZERO help in solving this problem from
>>> either
>>> cat coalitions or aspca organizations. And I don't mean financial help. I
>>> mean they won't lift a finger to help you trap a cat, or arrange in any
>>> way
>>> to get one fixed.....They just want to sit and wait for you to capture
>>> them
>>> and bring them to the vet for fixing.....As long as this is the case,
>>> there
>>> will be many millions of feral cats born every year, most of whom will
>>> starve to death. The problem is that you are afraid that if you catch one
>>> and get it fixed, he/she will leave and you will never see him again. (I
>>> certainly would if someone were to catch me in a trap and get me fixed)
>>
>> I've read this from you before.
>> Fear is the enemy.
>>
>> You know what's right, do the right thing.
>>
>> Cats don't hold grudges anyway.
>
> My, "doing the right thing" ....Or not, doesn't address the problem as I
> have outlined it. It is just your personalization of the problem, and it
> only begs the question.....If you want to help, then address the issue, and
> leave my situation out of it.
>
> Try to think of the millions of cats that starve to death every year, and
> not my one cat. - Perhaps that might help you to concentrate on the general
> issue.

I think I was clear enough.

You're trying to blame the ASPCA for not doing something
that you know you need to do yourself.

You know you should capture those strays and bring them to
the shelter. If you don't want to just leave them at the ASPCA then
pay to get them chipped and neutered.
This "the cat won't like me anymore" stuff is a bunch of crap.
Sorry to pass judgment on you, maybe you're right I shouldn't,
but you've posted this idea that the cat's going to hold a grudge
and you have to get someone else to take them to the vet too often.

Just my opinion, can't help it.

Anyway I do help, I don't feed stray cats.
My mother in law used to and I saw the results first hand.
It wasn't pretty. A bunch of cats running around with their
eyes falling out.

It's really simple, want to have a cat, feed it, neuter it,
own it. Don't go dumping food into a Malthusian catastrophe.

William Graham
October 5th 07, 06:15 AM
"Dan Espen" > wrote in message
...
> "William Graham" > writes:
>
>> "Dan Espen" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "William Graham" > writes:
>>>
>>>> "Dan Espen" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> "Spider" > writes:
>>>>>
>>>>>> "RPSinha" > wrote in message
>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>> We are feeding a neighborhood cat who visits us regularly. She is
>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>> 10 month old grey tabby. So far it has not been possible to weigh
>>>>>>> her
>>>>>>> (she is friendly enough and lets us touch her but really panics if
>>>>>>> we
>>>>>>> pick her up!)
>>>>> ...
>>>>>> Do not get me wrong. I am not criticizing you; just trying to
>>>>>> suggest
>>>>>> that
>>>>>> you take these welfare points into consideration. If you're
>>>>>> helping
>>>>>> a
>>>>>> known feral, that's fine - you're every kitty and cat-lovers hero.
>>>>>> You
>>>>>> obviously care about your feline visitor, which is great.
>>>>>
>>>>> It's not that great.
>>>>> If you feed a feral that's not altered
>>>>> you're creating at least 10 ferals in just the first year.
>>>>> Do the math.
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately, you get exactly ZERO help in solving this problem from
>>>> either
>>>> cat coalitions or aspca organizations. And I don't mean financial help.
>>>> I
>>>> mean they won't lift a finger to help you trap a cat, or arrange in any
>>>> way
>>>> to get one fixed.....They just want to sit and wait for you to capture
>>>> them
>>>> and bring them to the vet for fixing.....As long as this is the case,
>>>> there
>>>> will be many millions of feral cats born every year, most of whom will
>>>> starve to death. The problem is that you are afraid that if you catch
>>>> one
>>>> and get it fixed, he/she will leave and you will never see him again.
>>>> (I
>>>> certainly would if someone were to catch me in a trap and get me fixed)
>>>
>>> I've read this from you before.
>>> Fear is the enemy.
>>>
>>> You know what's right, do the right thing.
>>>
>>> Cats don't hold grudges anyway.
>>
>> My, "doing the right thing" ....Or not, doesn't address the problem as I
>> have outlined it. It is just your personalization of the problem, and it
>> only begs the question.....If you want to help, then address the issue,
>> and
>> leave my situation out of it.
>>
>> Try to think of the millions of cats that starve to death every year, and
>> not my one cat. - Perhaps that might help you to concentrate on the
>> general
>> issue.
>
> I think I was clear enough.
>
> You're trying to blame the ASPCA for not doing something
> that you know you need to do yourself.
>
> You know you should capture those strays and bring them to
> the shelter. If you don't want to just leave them at the ASPCA then
> pay to get them chipped and neutered.
> This "the cat won't like me anymore" stuff is a bunch of crap.
> Sorry to pass judgment on you, maybe you're right I shouldn't,
> but you've posted this idea that the cat's going to hold a grudge
> and you have to get someone else to take them to the vet too often.
>
> Just my opinion, can't help it.
>
> Anyway I do help, I don't feed stray cats.
> My mother in law used to and I saw the results first hand.
> It wasn't pretty. A bunch of cats running around with their
> eyes falling out.
>
> It's really simple, want to have a cat, feed it, neuter it,
> own it. Don't go dumping food into a Malthusian catastrophe.

Sure. I can do that. but what about the other 10.000 people (or more) who
are feeding ferals right now?

You are just like the guys that jumped all over me for driving at night when
I couldn't negotiate the roads well enough. I complained that the state
didn't paint the white lines delineating the road edges often enough, so it
was too hard for me to see and driving was dangerous. Instead of complaining
to the state authorities and telling them to paint those lines more often,
they just bitched at me for driving at night when my vision wasn't good
enough. I am trying to address a general problem that I have observed.
Instead of agreeing with me, you are bitching at me. Don't you see that it
doesn't matter what I personally do? - I could drop dead right now, and the
effect on all the feral cats in the world would be non-existent. In order to
help those animals, something has to actively take place over and above what
is happening right now. The best I can do is to identify the problem and
then write letters about it. You can either join me, or you can bitch at
me.....Your choice.

Spider
October 8th 07, 06:59 PM
"RPSinha" > wrote in message
...
> Spider > wrote:
>
> : Having read your OP and replies, I find I have no quarrel with the
> replies
> : you've received. However, I am a little concerned that you are feeding
> a
> : "neighbourhood cat". Is this a (possibly starving) feral cat, or a
> : neighbour's cat who is otherwise cared for?
>
> She doesn't have a collar and no owner I can figure out. She also has a
> very free schedule. She comes around at all sort of hours. She has
> stayed in our home anywhere from 1/2 hr (eat and leave) to 8-10 hrs
> (sleep). Sometimes she doesn't come for a few days.
>
> Usually she lets us know she wants to eat by aggressively trying to get
> into the cupboards (she has seen us get the cans from there). Similarly
> when she wants to leave she makes commotion to attract attention and
> then leads us towards the door.
>
> By the manner in which she eats and finishes food, see seems genuinely
> hungry. She can finish one small 3oz can without problem. Sometimes she
> does want more but can only eat a little of the second can. If she does
> eat a lot from the second can, she may throw up. That is why I had
> asked how much food is good for her.
>
> I do put water out but she rarely touches it.

Hi again,

Mmm. Hard to tell if she's feral or not, but she's undoubtedly hungry! To
answer your original question, I think you should stop at the 3oz can. By
throwing up whenever she has the extra food, she's telling you herself that
3oz is plenty. Of course she'll beg for more - especially if she is
feral - because she may not know where her next meal comes from. If you
want to boost this diet, then buy some hairball remedy cat biscuits and
offer those after her meal, if she's still hungry. I say this because cats
also vomit to expel hairballs (internal wads of fur that build up in the
cat's stomach following grooming); it is entirely natural. Some cats do it
much more than others. My own Cheetah is a serial hairball vomiter, so she
has hairball remedy and extra grooming.

Although you can't pick her up, I wonder if she will let you handle her? If
she will tolerate handling, think about putting a collar on her with a note
in one of those 'barrel' type collar fobs. That way, you may learn if she
has a home elsewhere. If she hasn't, maybe you could then think about
adopting her ....? Up to you.

Best of luck,
Spider

Ajanta
October 8th 07, 08:07 PM
Spider > wrote:

: Mmm. Hard to tell if she's feral or not, but she's undoubtedly hungry! To
: answer your original question, I think you should stop at the 3oz can. By
: throwing up whenever she has the extra food, she's telling you herself that
: 3oz is plenty. Of course she'll beg for more - especially if she is
: feral - because she may not know where her next meal comes from. If you
: want to boost this diet, then buy some hairball remedy cat biscuits and
: offer those after her meal, if she's still hungry. I say this because cats
: also vomit to expel hairballs (internal wads of fur that build up in the
: cat's stomach following grooming); it is entirely natural. Some cats do it
: much more than others. My own Cheetah is a serial hairball vomiter, so she
: has hairball remedy and extra grooming.
:
: Although you can't pick her up, I wonder if she will let you handle her? If
: she will tolerate handling, think about putting a collar on her with a note
: in one of those 'barrel' type collar fobs. That way, you may learn if she
: has a home elsewhere. If she hasn't, maybe you could then think about
: adopting her ....? Up to you.

I appreciate your thoughtful comments but conclude a little
differently.

If she has a home where she is loved and fed, then why is she so
hungry?

And if she spends all this time away from home, why doesn't anyone look
for her, put up posters etc?

SO, I wouldn't worry if she has a theoretical owner or not.

I mean, it does not seem like OP is tossing food towards a pet in his
neighbor's backyard. :-)

All ideological mumbo jumbo aside, she is a little creature who *is*
hungry and *she* herself has chosen OP to feed her---I would say go
ahead, feed her, and be grateful for the privilege!

[I come to this from a certain perspective of course.

No two situations are identical, but I fed a cat similarly for 2+
years. She wasn't feral, just abandoned at some point and lived in our
block of 6-7 connected yards. She was welcome in many homes but chose
ours to eat, and watch TV (!), and occasionally to sleep when whether
was hostile; otherwise she got comfortable with her domain and could
not be "adopted" into one home.

She passed away, from natural causes one year ago while we were away on
a trip. Later we learned from neighbors that she was about 17 yrs, and
also that many had tried to adopt her in the past.

I have been heartbroken and, while I used to visit this group regularly
for advice, could not bear to visit here for a year. Just thinking
about her brings tears to in my eyes.]

Spider
October 12th 07, 06:05 PM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> Spider > wrote:
>
> : Mmm. Hard to tell if she's feral or not, but she's undoubtedly hungry!
> To
> : answer your original question, I think you should stop at the 3oz can.
> By
> : throwing up whenever she has the extra food, she's telling you herself
> that
> : 3oz is plenty. Of course she'll beg for more - especially if she is
> : feral - because she may not know where her next meal comes from. If you
> : want to boost this diet, then buy some hairball remedy cat biscuits and
> : offer those after her meal, if she's still hungry. I say this because
> cats
> : also vomit to expel hairballs (internal wads of fur that build up in the
> : cat's stomach following grooming); it is entirely natural. Some cats do
> it
> : much more than others. My own Cheetah is a serial hairball vomiter, so
> she
> : has hairball remedy and extra grooming.
> :
> : Although you can't pick her up, I wonder if she will let you handle her?
> If
> : she will tolerate handling, think about putting a collar on her with a
> note
> : in one of those 'barrel' type collar fobs. That way, you may learn if
> she
> : has a home elsewhere. If she hasn't, maybe you could then think about
> : adopting her ....? Up to you.
>
Hi Ajanta,

> I appreciate your thoughtful comments but conclude a little
> differently.
>
> If she has a home where she is loved and fed, then why is she so
> hungry?
> *My Panther is adored and well fed. She is also perverse and steals from
> neighbours for the hell of it. I would rather she didn't have this extra
> food, but another cat's dinner is somewhat beyond my control.

> And if she spends all this time away from home, why doesn't anyone look
> for her, put up posters etc?
> * Been there .. done the posters .. shed the tears. Sometimes she chooses
> to disappear. Yet she truly knows she's loved and eventually always
> returns home. Fortunately, she's home with me more often than not.

> SO, I wouldn't worry if she has a theoretical owner or not.
>
> I mean, it does not seem like OP is tossing food towards a pet in his
> neighbor's backyard. :-)
>
> All ideological mumbo jumbo aside, she is a little creature who *is*
> hungry and *she* herself has chosen OP to feed her---I would say go
> ahead, feed her, and be grateful for the privilege!
>
> [I come to this from a certain perspective of course.
>
> No two situations are identical, but I fed a cat similarly for 2+
> years. She wasn't feral, just abandoned at some point and lived in our
> block of 6-7 connected yards. She was welcome in many homes but chose
> ours to eat, and watch TV (!), and occasionally to sleep when whether
> was hostile; otherwise she got comfortable with her domain and could
> not be "adopted" into one home.
>
> She passed away, from natural causes one year ago while we were away on
> a trip. Later we learned from neighbors that she was about 17 yrs, and
> also that many had tried to adopt her in the past.
>
> I have been heartbroken and, while I used to visit this group regularly
> for advice, could not bear to visit here for a year. Just thinking
> about her brings tears to in my eyes.]
*I'm so sorry to hear about the loss of your dear feline friend. I lost my
beautiful Cougar to a road accident three years ago. He ran across the road
just to be with me .. we loved each other so much .. it still breaks my
heart, because I still love him. Yes, of course I understand your
perspective; I simply add to that my own fears and considerations.

Spider