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GaryT
October 7th 07, 12:52 AM
Our relatively new (7 month old) cat is still somewhat feisty. Outside she
is a tree climber, inside she likes to get up on counters and explore when
we are not around to supervise, which means of course that things get pulled
off, including having broken three flower vases. In anticipation of the
holidays, we are looking for suggestions for keeping her out of the
decorations. In particular, keeping her out of the Christmas tree and the
risks of tipping it over, breaking ornaments, etc. We would prefer to not
resort to the negative type suggestions - "just don't have a tree, lights,
etc" - unless there are no other alternatives. We have seen unbreakable (and
unfortunately ugly) ornaments. Some way to discourage her from even entering
that room would be ideal, but some kind of tree guard or other suggestions
to prevent destructive behavior are appreciated.

Gary

Meghan Noecker
October 7th 07, 08:35 AM
On Sat, 6 Oct 2007 16:52:28 -0700, "GaryT"
> wrote:

>Our relatively new (7 month old) cat is still somewhat feisty. Outside she
>is a tree climber, inside she likes to get up on counters and explore when
>we are not around to supervise, which means of course that things get pulled
>off, including having broken three flower vases. In anticipation of the
>holidays, we are looking for suggestions for keeping her out of the
>decorations. In particular, keeping her out of the Christmas tree and the
>risks of tipping it over, breaking ornaments, etc. We would prefer to not
>resort to the negative type suggestions - "just don't have a tree, lights,
>etc" - unless there are no other alternatives. We have seen unbreakable (and
>unfortunately ugly) ornaments. Some way to discourage her from even entering
>that room would be ideal, but some kind of tree guard or other suggestions
>to prevent destructive behavior are appreciated.
>

Back when we used a fake tree, our cats knocked it over twice. After
that, we used fishing line to tie it up. Basically, we situated the
tree in a corner, and tied the tree with fishing line in two different
directions.

It didn't prevent them from climbing the tree, but it did prevent them
from knocking it over.

Stan Brown
October 7th 07, 01:07 PM
Sat, 6 Oct 2007 16:52:28 -0700 from GaryT
>:
> In anticipation of the
> holidays, we are looking for suggestions for keeping her out of the
> decorations. In particular, keeping her out of the Christmas tree and the
> risks of tipping it over, breaking ornaments, etc.

Keep her distracted with toys of her own. Maybe get one of those cat
condo things, but be sure it's returnable if she doesn't use it.

But secure the Christmas tree anyway. Our family has lost two of them
to cats. You need to screw a small eyelet into each of two different
spots in the wood frames of your windows or doors and then use wire
(not twine) to secure the tree trunk to them. That will be enough to
prevent the tree crashing down if she climbs in it and overbalances
it through being too far on one side of the trunk.

This is a good precaution anyway, if any human toddlers will be
visiting.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"If there's one thing I know, it's men. I ought to: it's
been my life work." -- Marie Dressler, in /Dinner at Eight/

GaryT
October 7th 07, 04:55 PM
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> Sat, 6 Oct 2007 16:52:28 -0700 from GaryT
> >:
>> In anticipation of the
>> holidays, we are looking for suggestions for keeping her out of the
>> decorations. In particular, keeping her out of the Christmas tree and the
>> risks of tipping it over, breaking ornaments, etc.
>
> Keep her distracted with toys of her own. Maybe get one of those cat
> condo things, but be sure it's returnable if she doesn't use it.
>
> But secure the Christmas tree anyway. Our family has lost two of them
> to cats. You need to screw a small eyelet into each of two different
> spots in the wood frames of your windows or doors and then use wire
> (not twine) to secure the tree trunk to them. That will be enough to
> prevent the tree crashing down if she climbs in it and overbalances
> it through being too far on one side of the trunk.
>
> This is a good precaution anyway, if any human toddlers will be
> visiting.
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA

Good reminder. One year we had a tree fall over during a wedding reception
in our home, and no one was even near by. I think it was just at the tipping
point and the air movement was enough to set it off.

I was particularly wondering if there were any sort of barriers, like a
clear cylinder that could go around the tree and would be a discouragement
from batting the ornaments, drinking the water, etc., or even a way to wall
off the room in a way that was convenient for people to have egress. There
is a wide entry way and no door. I thought perhaps there may be some
commercial products that are designed for pet blockades. Motion triggered
sounds that would encourage them to leave the area would also be a
possibility.

Gary

Buddy's Mom
October 7th 07, 05:15 PM
I would not put up a tree with a kitty that young - you are asking for
trouble until they are at least three - and then they still need some
training!

On Oct 6, 7:52?pm, "GaryT" > wrote:
> Our relatively new (7 month old) cat is still somewhat feisty. Outside she
> is a tree climber, inside she likes to get up on counters and explore when
> we are not around to supervise, which means of course that things get pulled
> off, including having broken three flower vases. In anticipation of the
> holidays, we are looking for suggestions for keeping her out of the
> decorations. In particular, keeping her out of the Christmas tree and the
> risks of tipping it over, breaking ornaments, etc. We would prefer to not
> resort to the negative type suggestions - "just don't have a tree, lights,
> etc" - unless there are no other alternatives. We have seen unbreakable (and
> unfortunately ugly) ornaments. Some way to discourage her from even entering
> that room would be ideal, but some kind of tree guard or other suggestions
> to prevent destructive behavior are appreciated.
>
> Gary

Meghan Noecker
October 8th 07, 12:26 AM
On Sun, 7 Oct 2007 08:55:40 -0700, "GaryT"
> wrote:


>Good reminder. One year we had a tree fall over during a wedding reception
>in our home, and no one was even near by. I think it was just at the tipping
>point and the air movement was enough to set it off.
>
>I was particularly wondering if there were any sort of barriers, like a
>clear cylinder that could go around the tree and would be a discouragement
>from batting the ornaments, drinking the water, etc., or even a way to wall
>off the room in a way that was convenient for people to have egress. There
>is a wide entry way and no door. I thought perhaps there may be some
>commercial products that are designed for pet blockades. Motion triggered
>sounds that would encourage them to leave the area would also be a
>possibility.


We've never done much to discourage the cats. They tend to bat at
lower ornaments, so we don't put much down that low. They really only
tried to climb it as kittens.

We did have a problem for a few years with a blind dog. The first year
she was blind, we walked into the room and found her standing under
the tree with a loop of tinsel or lights around her neck. Fortunately,
she was a very calm, easy going dog; so she stood there waiting for a
rescue instead of panicking and bringing down the tree.

After that, we bought some foam core, cut it out like a a little
picket fence (with rounded tops) and decorated it. The fence was only
a foot tall, and went around the tree. After that, anytime she bumped
into it, she would just turn and walk away. We were still able to put
presents under the tree. We just had an extra decoration that acted as
a protector for the dog.

Rene S.
October 8th 07, 05:15 PM
> Back when we used a fake tree, our cats knocked it over twice. After
> that, we used fishing line to tie it up. Basically, we situated the
> tree in a corner, and tied the tree with fishing line in two different
> directions.
>
> It didn't prevent them from climbing the tree, but it did prevent them
> from knocking it over.

Yes, secure with fishing line. I've also read that you can put the
tree inside a baby pack n play/play pen, but I haven't tried this. You
can place citrus peelings around the base of the tree to discourage
them from going there (don't like the smell) but you will have to
replace the peelings every few days.

Use unbreakable ornaments or simply don't have ornaments on the lower
branches. They do make some nice looking plastic ornaments now. DH and
I bought a bunch of them on clearance last year.

If you do see your cat in the tree, make sure she's not chewing on the
light cords! Check the cords periodically for damage.

On the bright side, after this year, you won't have to worry so
much. . .