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Talker
October 12th 07, 03:29 AM
We have an older indoor cat we adopted several years ago. She followed us
into the house and has been here since. Recently, we had a young cat, less
than a year old, show up outside. She is friendly, healthy, and judging by
the way she occasionally tries to come in is either a lost or abandoned
indoor cat. I wouldn't mind adopting her BUT my older cat is a BIG
problem. We had tried a couple of times in the past to bring in other cats
and it has been a major disaster. The last time we kept the new cat
separated in the living room where the only contact was thru a closed door.
My cat reacted by repeatedly trying to attack under the door and would
spend all her time sitting and growling at the door. After two weeks we
tried introducing the two, but it got out of hand quickly. My cat got away
and attacked and did enough damage in a couple of minutes to involve
surgury.

At this point with the cold weather coming quickly, we have to make a
decision about whether to TRY to find a new home for the cat, prep the cat
for outside, or bring her in.

Is there any helpful suggestions out there?

--
Constitution; Bill of Rights; -- Void where prohibited by law

MaryL
October 12th 07, 05:22 AM
"Talker" > wrote in message
...
> We have an older indoor cat we adopted several years ago. She followed us
> into the house and has been here since. Recently, we had a young cat,
> less
> than a year old, show up outside. She is friendly, healthy, and judging
> by
> the way she occasionally tries to come in is either a lost or abandoned
> indoor cat. I wouldn't mind adopting her BUT my older cat is a BIG
> problem. We had tried a couple of times in the past to bring in other
> cats
> and it has been a major disaster. The last time we kept the new cat
> separated in the living room where the only contact was thru a closed
> door.
> My cat reacted by repeatedly trying to attack under the door and would
> spend all her time sitting and growling at the door. After two weeks we
> tried introducing the two, but it got out of hand quickly. My cat got
> away
> and attacked and did enough damage in a couple of minutes to involve
> surgury.
>
> At this point with the cold weather coming quickly, we have to make a
> decision about whether to TRY to find a new home for the cat, prep the cat
> for outside, or bring her in.
>
> Is there any helpful suggestions out there?
>
> --
>

My cat, Holly, at one time would aggressively attack any other cat in my
vicinity. We called her "the black tornado," and I assumed that I could not
have another cat as long as Holly was with me. Then I saw a picture of
Duffy -- blind, in a cage at a shelter where he had been for several months,
and kitten season was approaching (which would mean lack of space, and it
was a kill shelter). I decided to adopt him, and a friend with lots of
rescue experience gave me help and advice. I followed that advice "to the
letter." It took about 6 weeks, but Holly and Duffy now get along
beautifully. I am attaching links under my signature to some pictures that
form a sort of photo history of what I did. The temporary door with the
wire mesh panel that you will see in some of the pictures (many people use
simple screen doors) was an important part of the process. I also wrote a
fairly long document some time ago describing the process. Please email me
privately if you would like for me to email it to you. The email that is
attached to this message is valid, except that you first need to
"take-out-the-litter."

Note: You *can* be successful. However, please proceed slowly and
carefully. It is a big mistake to just "throw cats together," especially
when you already know that one will be antagonistic.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
http://tinyurl.com/8y54 (Introducing Duffy to Holly)
http://tinyurl.com/8y56 (Duffy and Holly "settle in")

-Lost
October 12th 07, 06:02 AM
Response from Talker >:

> We have an older indoor cat we adopted several years ago. She
> followed us into the house and has been here since. Recently, we
> had a young cat, less than a year old, show up outside. She is
> friendly, healthy, and judging by the way she occasionally tries
> to come in is either a lost or abandoned indoor cat. I wouldn't
> mind adopting her BUT my older cat is a BIG problem. We had tried
> a couple of times in the past to bring in other cats and it has
> been a major disaster. The last time we kept the new cat
> separated in the living room where the only contact was thru a
> closed door. My cat reacted by repeatedly trying to attack under
> the door and would spend all her time sitting and growling at the
> door. After two weeks we tried introducing the two, but it got
> out of hand quickly. My cat got away and attacked and did enough
> damage in a couple of minutes to involve surgury.
>
> At this point with the cold weather coming quickly, we have to
> make a decision about whether to TRY to find a new home for the
> cat, prep the cat for outside, or bring her in.
>
> Is there any helpful suggestions out there?

I really like what MaryL had to say. I just want to reinforce it a
bit to make sure something was clear.

You mentioned that YOIC (your older indoor cat) would go ape and try
attacking under the door.

How would you feel if there was an interloper in your home AND you
could not even see them? You would react poorly and definitely
defensive. However if you could see that it was a pretty little
kitty you MIGHT calm down or at least calm down quicker than normal.

So what MaryL said about a screened or mesh door is not only a good
option but THE ONLY OPTION when it comes to separating them. By the
only option I mean they HAVE to be able to smell each other and see
each other without smashing their faces against a crevice or
underneath a door. Make it as pleasant as possible.

And with that... good luck.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

October 12th 07, 07:55 AM
On Oct 12, 3:02 pm, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response from Talker >:
>
>
>
>
>
> > We have an older indoor cat we adopted several years ago. She
> > followed us into the house and has been here since. Recently, we
> > had a young cat, less than a year old, show up outside. She is
> > friendly, healthy, and judging by the way she occasionally tries
> > to come in is either a lost or abandoned indoor cat. I wouldn't
> > mind adopting her BUT my older cat is a BIG problem. We had tried
> > a couple of times in the past to bring in other cats and it has
> > been a major disaster. The last time we kept the new cat
> > separated in the living room where the only contact was thru a
> > closed door. My cat reacted by repeatedly trying to attack under
> > the door and would spend all her time sitting and growling at the
> > door. After two weeks we tried introducing the two, but it got
> > out of hand quickly. My cat got away and attacked and did enough
> > damage in a couple of minutes to involve surgury.
>
> > At this point with the cold weather coming quickly, we have to
> > make a decision about whether to TRY to find a new home for the
> > cat, prep the cat for outside, or bring her in.
>
> > Is there any helpful suggestions out there?
>
> I really like what MaryL had to say. I just want to reinforce it a
> bit to make sure something was clear.
>
> You mentioned that YOIC (your older indoor cat) would go ape and try
> attacking under the door.
>
> How would you feel if there was an interloper in your home AND you
> could not even see them? You would react poorly and definitely
> defensive. However if you could see that it was a pretty little
> kitty you MIGHT calm down or at least calm down quicker than normal.
>
> So what MaryL said about a screened or mesh door is not only a good
> option but THE ONLY OPTION when it comes to separating them. By the
> only option I mean they HAVE to be able to smell each other and see
> each other without smashing their faces against a crevice or
> underneath a door. Make it as pleasant as possible.
>
> And with that... good luck.
>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Firstly when introducing an new cat to an old cat there are a few
things you should think about: the main thing is are the cats desexed
or were they desexed before they hit maturity i think you'll find that
cats not desexed before six months will be a whole lot more
aggressive. when you introduce the cats make sure that both cats are
being held and are are given lots of attention especially the elder
cat. make sure there are two people. hold the elder cat and put the
new cat down let it wander for a few minutes then pic it up and
repeat. if there is agression straight away with the elder cat a loud
NO in a deep voice (almost like a growl) and remove the cat from the
room instantly. Do this twice a day morning and evening. After a week
you should be able to have the cats in the same room for SHORT periods
of time fully supervised. Eventually this should work but it will
require time and effort. GOODLUCK!

CatNipped[_2_]
October 12th 07, 03:00 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...


> Firstly when introducing an new cat to an old cat there are a few
> things you should think about: the main thing is are the cats desexed
> or were they desexed before they hit maturity i think you'll find that
> cats not desexed before six months will be a whole lot more
> aggressive. when you introduce the cats make sure that both cats are
> being held and are are given lots of attention especially the elder
> cat. make sure there are two people. hold the elder cat and put the

WHOA! Really, *REALLY* bad idea - unless you like sitting in an emergency
room waiting for stitches in your arms and face. *NEVER, EVER* hold a cat
when introducing him/her to a new cat.

> new cat down let it wander for a few minutes then pic it up and
> repeat. if there is agression straight away with the elder cat a loud
> NO in a deep voice (almost like a growl) and remove the cat from the
> room instantly. Do this twice a day morning and evening. After a week
> you should be able to have the cats in the same room for SHORT periods
> of time fully supervised. Eventually this should work but it will
> require time and effort. GOODLUCK!

Cats don't understand "NO" in either a deep or falsetto voice - and if you
can remove an agressive cat from a room containing another cat *without*
body armor, I would be truly amazed.

Talker, listen to MaryL and follow her instructions closely - it's the best
shot you'll have at introducing the two cats. The approach she took is the
best I've ever heard of, with only one caveat... there really *are* some
cats who will always be an "only cat"**. I tried to home an extremely
sweet, human-lovey cat, and used MaryL's approach. After 6 weeks the cat
was still savagely attacking the 10-week-old kittens I'd also adopted (very
unusual for a cat not to pick up on the "I give up" body language of
kittens). We finally gave up and brought her back to her foster home and
let them know that she would make the *perfect* companion for someone who
wanted only one cat.

**Those who firmly aver otherwise, and who'll argue the point to death, have
never, I believe, really come across an "only cat" - just "difficult to
integrate" cats.

Hugs,

CatNipped

dgk
October 12th 07, 06:50 PM
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 09:00:35 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:

> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
>...
>Cats don't understand "NO" in either a deep or falsetto voice -
>
..

Oh yes they do. They just ignore it.

CatNipped[_2_]
October 12th 07, 07:09 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 09:00:35 -0500, "CatNipped"
> > wrote:
>
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>>
>>...
>>Cats don't understand "NO" in either a deep or falsetto voice -
>>
> .
>
> Oh yes they do. They just ignore it.

LOL, OK, well that's true - but the outcome is the same! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped