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dgk
October 12th 07, 06:49 PM
The lab report is in.

Well, that explains why he has been licking part of his fur off. He's
been on antibiotics and a steroid since Monday and has gotten better I
think. Of course, he's been ripping off MY skin when I try to get that
stuff into his mouth. Then he glares at me. But I give him some of his
favorite treat (Temptations - kitty krack) and all is forgiven. Only 6
more days to go and I can start healing.

cybercat
October 12th 07, 08:45 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> The lab report is in.
>

Think he got that in the house?

Rene S.
October 12th 07, 09:42 PM
On Oct 12, 12:49 pm, dgk > wrote:
> The lab report is in.
>
> Well, that explains why he has been licking part of his fur off. He's
> been on antibiotics and a steroid since Monday and has gotten better I
> think. Of course, he's been ripping off MY skin when I try to get that
> stuff into his mouth. Then he glares at me. But I give him some of his
> favorite treat (Temptations - kitty krack) and all is forgiven. Only 6
> more days to go and I can start healing.

Glad you got an answer! Have you tried using Pill Pockets? www.pillpockets.com
They are wonderful for pilling cats.

dgk
October 15th 07, 01:28 PM
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 13:42:17 -0700, "Rene S."
> wrote:

>On Oct 12, 12:49 pm, dgk > wrote:
>> The lab report is in.
>>
>> Well, that explains why he has been licking part of his fur off. He's
>> been on antibiotics and a steroid since Monday and has gotten better I
>> think. Of course, he's been ripping off MY skin when I try to get that
>> stuff into his mouth. Then he glares at me. But I give him some of his
>> favorite treat (Temptations - kitty krack) and all is forgiven. Only 6
>> more days to go and I can start healing.
>
>Glad you got an answer! Have you tried using Pill Pockets? www.pillpockets.com
>They are wonderful for pilling cats.

They really are great and by a wild coincidence I just got a free
packet at the Cat Show (at MSG). However, the antibiotic is liquid and
the vet put the steroid in the antibiotic. So I just have to squirt it
in his mouth. Still, he isn't a good patient.

dgk
October 15th 07, 01:31 PM
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:45:30 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> The lab report is in.
>>
>
>Think he got that in the house?
>

I don't know. He (and Nipsy and Marlo) do go out into the backyard,
but Staph Aureus isn't a very rare bacteria. It's easily treated
unless you get the resistant one, which is known as the flesh eating
bacteria.

He probably got it via a bite from one of the other cats.

cybercat
October 15th 07, 05:06 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:45:30 -0400, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>>> The lab report is in.
>>>
>>
>>Think he got that in the house?
>>
>
> I don't know. He (and Nipsy and Marlo) do go out into the backyard,
> but Staph Aureus isn't a very rare bacteria. It's easily treated
> unless you get the resistant one, which is known as the flesh eating
> bacteria.
>
> He probably got it via a bite from one of the other cats.

Well, once humans get staph it can be hard to get rid of. A
relative of mine got it young and it has never really left her
system, it just abates and re-emerges.

dgk
October 16th 07, 01:27 PM
On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 12:06:16 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:45:30 -0400, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>>>> The lab report is in.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Think he got that in the house?
>>>
>>
>> I don't know. He (and Nipsy and Marlo) do go out into the backyard,
>> but Staph Aureus isn't a very rare bacteria. It's easily treated
>> unless you get the resistant one, which is known as the flesh eating
>> bacteria.
>>
>> He probably got it via a bite from one of the other cats.
>
>Well, once humans get staph it can be hard to get rid of. A
>relative of mine got it young and it has never really left her
>system, it just abates and re-emerges.
>

I've never heard of that type of thing; that sounds more like a virus
which can hide in the body for years, like shingles. I actually know
something about this because I was a lab technologist in Bacteriology
before switching fields many years ago.

Staph Aureus is fairly common and only causes infection through a
break in the skin or somehow getting where it shouldn't be. Of course,
if it gets into the bloodstream or heart it can be deadly, but that
really only happens in folks who are otherwise immuno-challenged.

Still, all in all, you'd rather not have it in you. On you is ok.

dgk
October 16th 07, 08:33 PM
On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 12:06:16 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:45:30 -0400, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>>>> The lab report is in.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Think he got that in the house?
>>>
>>
>> I don't know. He (and Nipsy and Marlo) do go out into the backyard,
>> but Staph Aureus isn't a very rare bacteria. It's easily treated
>> unless you get the resistant one, which is known as the flesh eating
>> bacteria.
>>
>> He probably got it via a bite from one of the other cats.
>
>Well, once humans get staph it can be hard to get rid of. A
>relative of mine got it young and it has never really left her
>system, it just abates and re-emerges.
>

Oh wow, and just in time comes this newsarticle. Apparently staph is
making the rounds of locker rooms:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21272665/

cybercat
October 17th 07, 07:15 PM
"dgk" > wrote
> Oh wow, and just in time comes this newsarticle. Apparently staph is
> making the rounds of locker rooms:
>
> http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21272665/

When my sister had this (and I think she still does) it was in the
1970s, and it must have been a resistant variety of Staphlococcus.
It actually did act like a virus, being held at bay but re-emerging.

I have a friend who picked up some sort of bacterial thing--she and
her husband both--while caring for his mother in the hospital as she
lay dying. It will not go away, despite the best care at Duke. It just
travels around, causing stomach problems, then ear infections, etc.

Scary stuff.

dgk
October 17th 07, 09:00 PM
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 14:37:34 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>This was in the news I thought it might be something you would be interested
>in reading
>
>http://www.local6.com/health/14355868/detail.html?treets=orlpn&tid=2653055048813&tml=orlpn_dailyforecast&tmi=orlpn_dailyforecast_1_04000210172007&ts=H
>
>

Very nice. Yet another reason to stay out of the gym. I knew those
places were unhealthy.

Katrina[_2_]
October 19th 07, 04:51 PM
Oh my gosh! I have one cat who loves to go outside even tho he's
*supposed* to be an indoor kitty. I'm gonna have to keep a closer eye
on him. This staph thing really worries me. I even put together an
information portal at http://staphinfectioninfo.blogspot.com/ to help
me learn more about it, and to hopefully help others.

On Oct 15, 8:31 am, dgk > wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:45:30 -0400, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>
>
> >"dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> The lab report is in.
>
> >Think he got that in the house?
>
> I don't know. He (and Nipsy and Marlo) do go out into the backyard,
> butStaphAureus isn't a very rare bacteria. It's easily treated
> unless you get the resistant one, which is known as the flesh eating
> bacteria.
>
> He probably got it via a bite from one of the other cats.

dgk
October 22nd 07, 02:25 PM
On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 07:58:06 -0500, wrote:

>dgk > wrote in
:
>
> Have you tried using Pill Pockets?
>>>www.pillpockets.com They are wonderful for pilling cats.
>>
>> They really are great and by a wild coincidence I just got a free
>> packet at the Cat Show (at MSG). However, the antibiotic is liquid and
>> the vet put the steroid in the antibiotic. So I just have to squirt it
>> in his mouth. Still, he isn't a good patient.
>>
>
>How is Espy doing? I hope he's improving.
>
>As far as pillpockets go, my cat wouldn't touch them.
>What I end up doing is crushing her pill into a fine powder and
>mixing it with her food.
>
>It's good that your vet gave you a liquid. I know it isn't easy to hold a
>cat and get them to say "ah" and squeeze the dropper into the mouth.
>Did you ask your vet if you could mix the liquid medication with the cat's
>food? You have to make sure you don't give them too much food, since you
>want to ensure they finish eating everything.

There does appear to fur growing over the patch so things are looking
ok. We finished the medicine, 10 days 2x a day. He was still fussing
the last few days but he clearly understood that he was going to get
squirted in the mouth so it was more of a symbolic struggle than a
real one. Plus he did get his treats right after.

It's tough with three cats to try the liquid in the food trick. I've
done that in the past, but these three shift around quite a bit and I
don't want the other cats getting his medicine. Feeding time is
getting more complicated in general because Espy is fairly lean but
both Nipsy and Marlo are getting too chunky. Marlo is apparently
trying out for the role of Balloon. I've already cut down on their
food but it's tough giving Espy enough and them less.

dgk
October 22nd 07, 08:53 PM
On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 20:08:23 -0500, Cheryl
> wrote:

>On Fri 12 Oct 2007 01:49:46p, dgk wrote in
>rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:
>
>> The lab report is in.
>>
>> Well, that explains why he has been licking part of his fur off.
>> He's been on antibiotics and a steroid since Monday and has
>> gotten better I think. Of course, he's been ripping off MY skin
>> when I try to get that stuff into his mouth. Then he glares at
>> me. But I give him some of his favorite treat (Temptations -
>> kitty krack) and all is forgiven. Only 6 more days to go and I
>> can start healing.
>>
>
>I hope he's improving by now. In the news right now is a strain of
>staph that is antibiotic resistant and affecting humans, and
>spreading through the schools and even a local univerisity. I've
>been wondering if this strain of staph is something we have to
>protect our pets from. Shamrock doesn't have any open lesions
>right now, but he's prone to them due to his allergies. I've been
>in a training class in DC all week and taking trains and buses
>back and forth. I know from my own history that public transit and
>classrooms are always when I get sick. What if I have the staph
>bacteria on me when I come home?

There isn't too much you can do really. Washing hands is the main
preventative. Open sores is a problem because normally staph needs a
way to get in. MRSA is not new; when I was a microbiology tech over 20
years ago it already was around. It used to be mostly hospital
acquired and now seems to be in locker rooms and gyms and stuff.

Espy is getting better. I wouldn't worry too much about Shamrock over
this, there are so many other things to worry about. I think this just
sort of became the medical news of the week because a kid died from
it.