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AR
October 13th 07, 03:20 AM
I keep buying my cat these to product him from cars at night, and he
keeps coming home without them. It's getting expensive to keep
replacing them. I'm thinking of gluing it shut, and making the collar
looser so he won't hurt himself if he gets it caught on something. Bad
idea? Any other collars that would reflect a car's headlights?

The furball is so smart he probably figured out how to get it off by
himself. Wonder if the bell on it was driving him nuts...LOL!

cybercat
October 13th 07, 05:39 AM
"AR" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I keep buying my cat these to product him from cars at night, and he
> keeps coming home without them. It's getting expensive to keep
> replacing them. I'm thinking of gluing it shut, and making the collar
> looser so he won't hurt himself if he gets it caught on something. Bad
> idea? Any other collars that would reflect a car's headlights?
>
> The furball is so smart he probably figured out how to get it off by
> himself. Wonder if the bell on it was driving him nuts...LOL!
>

LOL! You let your cat out where cars are a problem, expecting the
"glo" feature of the collar to keep him safe from cars, never mind
sadists and other animals. Now you'd like to take away the only
thing preventing your cat from hanging himself. Why not just shoot
him in the head. :)

AR
October 13th 07, 03:28 PM
Your post doesn't even deserve a reply, but I'm going to offer one
anyway. I didn't say cars are a problem but they do exist on any
street. We have much less traffic as it's a cul de sac. I never said
it would keep him safe from cars, but I thought it would help him in
being seen. I don't usually let him out at night, but sometimes he
doesn't want to come in earlier. It's not fair to keep the cat locked
up all day when he wants to go out. He should be able to enjoy the
outdoors, and what's wrong with socializing with other cats?

Cars, animals, and sadists are a threat to humans too, but we don't
stay locked in the house all day, so why should he? I love my cat, and
your post was mean spirited and uncalled for. Perhaps you should be
the one kept indoors all day!

> oups.com...
>
> >I keep buying my cat these to product him from cars at night, and he
> > keeps coming home without them. It's getting expensive to keep
> > replacing them. I'm thinking of gluing it shut, and making the collar
> > looser so he won't hurt himself if he gets it caught on something. Bad
> > idea? Any other collars that would reflect a car's headlights?
>
> > The furball is so smart he probably figured out how to get it off by
> > himself. Wonder if the bell on it was driving him nuts...LOL!
>
> LOL! You let your cat out where cars are a problem, expecting the
> "glo" feature of the collar to keep him safe from cars, never mind
> sadists and other animals. Now you'd like to take away the only
> thing preventing your cat from hanging himself. Why not just shoot
> him in the head. :)

cybercat
October 13th 07, 03:41 PM
"AR" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Your post doesn't even deserve a reply, but I'm going to offer one
> anyway. I didn't say cars are a problem but they do exist on any
> street. We have much less traffic as it's a cul de sac. I never said
> it would keep him safe from cars, but I thought it would help him in
> being seen. I don't usually let him out at night, but sometimes he
> doesn't want to come in earlier. It's not fair to keep the cat locked
> up all day when he wants to go out. He should be able to enjoy the
> outdoors, and what's wrong with socializing with other cats?
>
> Cars, animals, and sadists are a threat to humans too, but we don't
> stay locked in the house all day, so why should he? I love my cat, and
> your post was mean spirited and uncalled for. Perhaps you should be
> the one kept indoors all day!
>

I understand that your cat is on his own when it comes to dealing with
the world at large, and that you are comfortable with that.

Just be sure not to make matters worse by putting a collar on your
cat that is sure to strangle him.

AR
October 13th 07, 06:11 PM
On Oct 13, 10:41 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "AR" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > Your post doesn't even deserve a reply, but I'm going to offer one
> > anyway. I didn't say cars are a problem but they do exist on any
> > street. We have much less traffic as it's a cul de sac. I never said
> > it would keep him safe from cars, but I thought it would help him in
> > being seen. I don't usually let him out at night, but sometimes he
> > doesn't want to come in earlier. It's not fair to keep the cat locked
> > up all day when he wants to go out. He should be able to enjoy the
> > outdoors, and what's wrong with socializing with other cats?
>
> > Cars, animals, and sadists are a threat to humans too, but we don't
> > stay locked in the house all day, so why should he? I love my cat, and
> > your post was mean spirited and uncalled for. Perhaps you should be
> > the one kept indoors all day!
>
> I understand that your cat is on his own when it comes to dealing with
> the world at large, and that you are comfortable with that.
>
> Just be sure not to make matters worse by putting a collar on your
> cat that is sure to strangle him.

What I was really asking was if the collar was made looser would it
then be OK to then stop it from opening? I was hoping that if he got
into a bind he could just wiggle out of the collar then. Is anyone
else using these glo kitty collars? I wish they made stretch collars
where the cat wouldn't keep losing them, but it wouldn't hurt the cat
if he got stuck. I didn't see any other reflective collars on the
market besides these, but he keeps losing his as they come off too
easily.

cybercat
October 13th 07, 06:34 PM
"AR" > wrote
>>
>> I understand that your cat is on his own when it comes to dealing with
>> the world at large, and that you are comfortable with that.
>>
>> Just be sure not to make matters worse by putting a collar on your
>> cat that is sure to strangle him.
>
> What I was really asking was if the collar was made looser would it
> then be OK to then stop it from opening?

Ever seen a cat hung on its own collar? Gravity is usually involved.
Jumping a fence, collar gets snagged, bam. Either get serious about
keeping your cat safe, or resign yourself to "**** happens." The "glo
collar" does nothing but make you feel better about endangering him.
Except of course making him easier for those who love to run over
cats to spot at night.

---MIKE---
October 13th 07, 07:08 PM
AR asked:

>>What I was really asking was if the
>> collar was made looser would it then
>> be OK to then stop it from opening?

I would think a looser collar would be more likely to get caught on
something than a tight collar. The safest bet is no collar at all.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

James
October 13th 07, 07:38 PM
On Oct 13, 1:11 pm, AR > wrote:
> On Oct 13, 10:41 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "AR" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > > Your post doesn't even deserve a reply, but I'm going to offer one
> > > anyway. I didn't say cars are a problem but they do exist on any
> > > street. We have much less traffic as it's a cul de sac. I never said
> > > it would keep him safe from cars, but I thought it would help him in
> > > being seen. I don't usually let him out at night, but sometimes he
> > > doesn't want to come in earlier. It's not fair to keep the cat locked
> > > up all day when he wants to go out. He should be able to enjoy the
> > > outdoors, and what's wrong with socializing with other cats?
>
> > > Cars, animals, and sadists are a threat to humans too, but we don't
> > > stay locked in the house all day, so why should he? I love my cat, and
> > > your post was mean spirited and uncalled for. Perhaps you should be
> > > the one kept indoors all day!
>
> > I understand that your cat is on his own when it comes to dealing with
> > the world at large, and that you are comfortable with that.
>
> > Just be sure not to make matters worse by putting a collar on your
> > cat that is sure to strangle him.
>
> What I was really asking was if the collar was made looser would it
> then be OK to then stop it from opening? I was hoping that if he got
> into a bind he could just wiggle out of the collar then. Is anyone
> else using these glo kitty collars? I wish they made stretch collars
> where the cat wouldn't keep losing them, but it wouldn't hurt the cat
> if he got stuck. I didn't see any other reflective collars on the
> market besides these, but he keeps losing his as they come off too
> easily.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I use safety collars and have only lost one in a year. It doesn't
seem to pull open that easily. Maybe you can try a different brand.
Don't remember the brand but I got it at PetsMart. It's the cheapest
non-reflecting model with a bell and safety. Maybe you can add
reflective tape or paint on the collar.

-Lost
October 13th 07, 10:56 PM
Response from (---MIKE---):

> AR asked:
>
>>>What I was really asking was if the
>>> collar was made looser would it then
>>> be OK to then stop it from opening?
>
> I would think a looser collar would be more likely to get caught on
> something than a tight collar. The safest bet is no collar at all.

That is what I was thinking. Either a SNUG collar or no collar at
all. We toyed with the idea of having Gabby wear one and it was the
cutest thing... she played with it forever (it was a little too big
for her so we looped it and it stuck out). Then one night I noticed
her yowling (crying) a lot and finally I just said, "You want that
collar off don't you?"

I began to pull at it and she seemed to really lean into me. I took
it off and she proceeded to pounce and maul it maliciously. She DID
NOT like the collar.

And honestly it makes no sense whatsoever to collar a cat with a
reflective collar. If she is in a position to get hit by a car she
is going to get hit.

I mean... I think of all the deer, rabbits, turtles, and other
miscellaneous critters we have ran over in the last 2 or 3 decades
and if they had been wearing reflective collars I am fairly certain
they would have still been creamed.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

AR[_2_]
October 14th 07, 03:06 AM
On Oct 13, 5:56 pm, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response from (---MIKE---):
>
> > AR asked:
>
> >>>What I was really asking was if the
> >>> collar was made looser would it then
> >>> be OK to then stop it from opening?
>
> > I would think a looser collar would be more likely to get caught on
> > something than a tight collar. The safest bet is no collar at all.
>
> That is what I was thinking. Either a SNUG collar or no collar at
> all. We toyed with the idea of having Gabby wear one and it was the
> cutest thing... she played with it forever (it was a little too big
> for her so we looped it and it stuck out). Then one night I noticed
> her yowling (crying) a lot and finally I just said, "You want that
> collar off don't you?"
>
> I began to pull at it and she seemed to really lean into me. I took
> it off and she proceeded to pounce and maul it maliciously. She DID
> NOT like the collar.
>
> And honestly it makes no sense whatsoever to collar a cat with a
> reflective collar. If she is in a position to get hit by a car she
> is going to get hit.
>
> I mean... I think of all the deer, rabbits, turtles, and other
> miscellaneous critters we have ran over in the last 2 or 3 decades
> and if they had been wearing reflective collars I am fairly certain
> they would have still been creamed.
>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

The collar is so he doesn't get mistaken for a stray, and if he
wonders further than normal, and gets a bit lost. It holds an ID tag
that has his name, address and phone # on it, so hopefully someone
will call to get him back to us. I was afraid someone would take him
in otherwise, thinking he didn't belong to anyone.

James
October 14th 07, 06:05 AM
On Oct 13, 10:06 pm, AR > wrote:
> On Oct 13, 5:56 pm, "-Lost" > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Response from (---MIKE---):
>
> > > AR asked:
>
> > >>>What I was really asking was if the
> > >>> collar was made looser would it then
> > >>> be OK to then stop it from opening?
>
> > > I would think a looser collar would be more likely to get caught on
> > > something than a tight collar. The safest bet is no collar at all.
>
> > That is what I was thinking. Either a SNUG collar or no collar at
> > all. We toyed with the idea of having Gabby wear one and it was the
> > cutest thing... she played with it forever (it was a little too big
> > for her so we looped it and it stuck out). Then one night I noticed
> > her yowling (crying) a lot and finally I just said, "You want that
> > collar off don't you?"
>
> > I began to pull at it and she seemed to really lean into me. I took
> > it off and she proceeded to pounce and maul it maliciously. She DID
> > NOT like the collar.
>
> > And honestly it makes no sense whatsoever to collar a cat with a
> > reflective collar. If she is in a position to get hit by a car she
> > is going to get hit.
>
> > I mean... I think of all the deer, rabbits, turtles, and other
> > miscellaneous critters we have ran over in the last 2 or 3 decades
> > and if they had been wearing reflective collars I am fairly certain
> > they would have still been creamed.
>
> > --
> > -Lost
> > Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> > kidding. No I am not.
>
> The collar is so he doesn't get mistaken for a stray, and if he
> wonders further than normal, and gets a bit lost. It holds an ID tag
> that has his name, address and phone # on it, so hopefully someone
> will call to get him back to us. I was afraid someone would take him
> in otherwise, thinking he didn't belong to anyone.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

That is one reason I collar my pussy. A neighborhood kid was trying
to catch her thinking she had no home. However the main reason I gave
her a collar is the bell. I'm so scare that I might accidently slam
the door at her again.

-Lost
October 14th 07, 12:59 PM
Response from AR >:

> The collar is so he doesn't get mistaken for a stray, and if he
> wonders further than normal, and gets a bit lost. It holds an ID
> tag that has his name, address and phone # on it, so hopefully
> someone will call to get him back to us. I was afraid someone
> would take him in otherwise, thinking he didn't belong to anyone.

You know, that IS a good point. I didn't think of that. I am not
sure of the cost involved but you might want to consider that pet
GPS/ID RFID chip or whatever the heck it is called nowadays...

This way you can track your cat if he becomes lost or if someone has
a pet scanner they can read that he has an owner and return him.

http://www.homeagain.com/

If you feel that a collar is still the way to go and you want to
waste a lot of money, you could try:

http://www.lovemypetgps.com/

Good luck.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-Lost
October 14th 07, 01:10 PM
> http://www.lovemypetgps.com/

After thinking about it further I doubt this will work for a cat.

I think this because if Global Pet Finder (someone I am familiar with)
does not have a solution for cats, then I doubt that above URL does
either.

http://www.globalpetfinder.com/faq.html

Good luck.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.