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View Full Version : Is there such a thing as "cat whistle"?


RPSinha
October 19th 07, 02:41 PM
I have been asking a lot of questions, but please bear with me!

My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something cats
can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for dogs.)

Sometimes we have to go looking for our cat, who may be hiding who
knows where. It is quite a spectacle to go around yelling her name. If
there was a whistle we could teach her to recognize, but people
couldn't hear it, then we could do this discreetly.

.._..
October 19th 07, 04:01 PM
There might be such a device. (Dog whistles probably can be heard by them,
their eardrums are small enough they may pick up that frequency.)

Whether or not your cat actually responds to it on the other hand... it may
require you to train the cat that whistle means treat time or something.

"RPSinha" > wrote in message
...
>I have been asking a lot of questions, but please bear with me!
>
> My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something cats
> can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for dogs.)
>
> Sometimes we have to go looking for our cat, who may be hiding who
> knows where. It is quite a spectacle to go around yelling her name. If
> there was a whistle we could teach her to recognize, but people
> couldn't hear it, then we could do this discreetly.

William Graham
October 19th 07, 04:11 PM
"RPSinha" > wrote in message
...
>I have been asking a lot of questions, but please bear with me!
>
> My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something cats
> can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for dogs.)

A dog whistle works fine....My B-K comes a runnun' in the evening when I go
out on the front porch and blow mine.....(He knows he's going to get a
goodie).

Mark G.[_2_]
October 19th 07, 04:28 PM
"RPSinha" > wrote:
>
> My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something cats
> can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for dogs.)

Tuna can being opened at 250 yards?

William Graham
October 19th 07, 09:24 PM
"Mark G." > wrote in message
...
> "RPSinha" > wrote:
>>
>> My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something cats
>> can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for dogs.)
>
> Tuna can being opened at 250 yards?
>
>
That'll do it....A spoon banging on the side of the cat dish works well,
too........

---MIKE---
October 19th 07, 11:13 PM
When I feed the canned food (breakfast and dinner) I ring a small dinner
bell as I put the plates down. Tiger and Amber don't go out but I
figure if one of them did get out, ringing the bell should bring him/her
running.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

-Lost
October 20th 07, 04:40 PM
Response from RPSinha >:

> I have been asking a lot of questions, but please bear with me!
>
> My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something
> cats can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for
> dogs.)
>
> Sometimes we have to go looking for our cat, who may be hiding who
> knows where. It is quite a spectacle to go around yelling her
> name. If there was a whistle we could teach her to recognize, but
> people couldn't hear it, then we could do this discreetly.

From the very beginning I used "Gabby" for everything related to the
cat. And I used "gabby-gabby-gabby" in a high-pitched and fast
voice to mean here comes dinner.

Now I can literally call his name once and he comes to see what I
want? If I use the "dinner bell," he blasts off from wherever he is
and heads straight to his bowl.

So calling them DOES work. You just have to put in 10x the effort
as you do with a dog it seems.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

studio
October 20th 07, 07:12 PM
On Oct 20, 11:40 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response from RPSinha >:
> > My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something
> > cats can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for
> > dogs.)
>
> > Sometimes we have to go looking for our cat, who may be hiding who
> > knows where. It is quite a spectacle to go around yelling her
> > name. If there was a whistle we could teach her to recognize, but
> > people couldn't hear it, then we could do this discreetly.

Dog and cat whistles emit both frequencies in the audible and non-
audible
range of humans.
Cats and dogs do have sensitive hearing and are able to hear sounds
outside the range of what humans can normally hear.

> From the very beginning I used "Gabby" for everything related to the
> And I used "gabby-gabby-gabby" in a high-pitched and fast
> voice to mean here comes dinner.

OMG...I remember when I was a kid, my mom would yell out the back
door; "hear kitty kitty kitty!"
And Tom the cat would come running.
Quite a spectacle is right.

I use a forceful "ssssssssp, ssssssssp" to get Mama to come to me.
It's mid-high frequency, without the loud volume...no whistle needed.

Whatever you decide to use, stick with it.

Mike[_3_]
October 21st 07, 02:52 AM
I just shake the bag. Not only does a bag of cat food make a nice percussion
instrument, it works well about 60% of the time in getting Her Majesty,
Isis, to leave her hiding place somewhere and come to see what's what.

I would also note that my failure to keep the bowl filled, again, is getting
dangerous for me. I was walking in my stocking feet and one of those little
deadly razor claws was deliberately snagged in one of my socks very very
close to my tender big toe skin. I filled the bowl with less than day old
canned food and things are pretty quiet now.

Mike in Illinois



"studio" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Oct 20, 11:40 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
>> Response from RPSinha >:
>> > My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something
>> > cats can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for
>> > dogs.)
>>
>> > Sometimes we have to go looking for our cat, who may be hiding who
>> > knows where. It is quite a spectacle to go around yelling her
>> > name. If there was a whistle we could teach her to recognize, but
>> > people couldn't hear it, then we could do this discreetly.
>
> Dog and cat whistles emit both frequencies in the audible and non-
> audible
> range of humans.
> Cats and dogs do have sensitive hearing and are able to hear sounds
> outside the range of what humans can normally hear.
>
>> From the very beginning I used "Gabby" for everything related to the
>> And I used "gabby-gabby-gabby" in a high-pitched and fast
>> voice to mean here comes dinner.
>
> OMG...I remember when I was a kid, my mom would yell out the back
> door; "hear kitty kitty kitty!"
> And Tom the cat would come running.
> Quite a spectacle is right.
>
> I use a forceful "ssssssssp, ssssssssp" to get Mama to come to me.
> It's mid-high frequency, without the loud volume...no whistle needed.
>
> Whatever you decide to use, stick with it.
>

bartlet
October 22nd 07, 12:30 AM
On Oct 19, 6:41 am, RPSinha > wrote:
> I have been asking a lot of questions, but please bear with me!
>
> My latest is: Is there such a thing as "cat whistle", something cats
> can hear and humans can't. (Similar to what's available for dogs.)
>
> Sometimes we have to go looking for our cat, who may be hiding who
> knows where. It is quite a spectacle to go around yelling her name. If
> there was a whistle we could teach her to recognize, but people
> couldn't hear it, then we could do this discreetly.

olah

cat whistle? I guess

I call mine like dogs

one night, I stuck my head out the door and hollered big and loud,
JUPITER get your black ass in here!

here she come

they lay in wait, their god is their belly

their territory is as large as their stomach

RPSinha
October 25th 07, 07:58 AM
The OP here. Great suggestions. However, my concern is not simply how
to make the cat hear me. It is doing so without making a nuisance of
myself all over the neighborhood. Maybe I am self-conscious, but I
would like to be as discreet towards other humans as possible.

I am taking care of a neighbor's cat for about 6 months while they are
out of the country. She spends the days outside. I would like to ring
the whistle in my backyard and have her come, without bothering the
neighbors everyday. Even more so if I have to walk the block blowing my
whistle. :)

Upscale
October 25th 07, 08:13 AM
> The OP here. Great suggestions. However, my concern is not simply how
> to make the cat hear me. It is doing so without making a nuisance of
> myself all over the neighborhood. Maybe I am self-conscious, but I
> would like to be as discreet towards other humans as possible.

I have a high pitched dog whistle I bought a few years ago in a futile
attempt to eliminate pigeons from my balcony. When I blow it, my cat gets
irritated so I know she can hear it. But, getting a cat to respond to one
might be very problematic unless you can associate the high pitched noise
with the knowledge that there's food or some special treat ready and
waiting. The only thing I can think of is to blow it absolutely every time
just before you put out some food or treats. The hard part will be
remembering to blow it unless you attach it to wherever you keep the cat
food.

studio
October 25th 07, 08:30 PM
On Oct 25, 2:58 am, RPSinha > wrote:
> The OP here. Great suggestions. However, my concern is not simply how
> to make the cat hear me. It is doing so without making a nuisance of
> myself all over the neighborhood. Maybe I am self-conscious, but I
> would like to be as discreet towards other humans as possible.

Understood.
That's why I use a "ssssssp"...the intensity of the volume is not
like someone yelling or whistling...and cats can hear it from quite
a distance depending on how forceful you apply it.
I associated it by doing it lightly right before I fed her when she
was
younger, but now she just knows it to mean "come".

It's a common call for cats by humans...I've heard it done inversely
(psss, psss)
by many folks trying to get a cat to come to them.
I just reversed it and made it a bit longer.

spannerswirlyflow
October 26th 07, 10:51 AM
The suggestion of using a 'dog's-whistle' is a good one, I have used the
same type of whistle for nearly 20 years and it has never failed to bring
back my feline from wherever it is that he happens to be hiding and the
advice to associate the sound of the whistle with a nice treat of some
description is spot-on.
(I did notice however that the so-called 'silent' whistles are not that
silent at all and you would be berated for blowing it at 1.00am but I
unscrewed my whistle and removed the 'barrel' and just blow through the
'reed-end' and all we hear is a slight rush of air - a bit like blowing out
forcefully yet the cat hears it as a very loud noise - even up to 500 yards
or more).
DS N7

William Graham
October 27th 07, 12:32 AM
"spannerswirlyflow" > wrote in message
.uk...
> The suggestion of using a 'dog's-whistle' is a good one, I have used the
> same type of whistle for nearly 20 years and it has never failed to bring
> back my feline from wherever it is that he happens to be hiding and the
> advice to associate the sound of the whistle with a nice treat of some
> description is spot-on.
> (I did notice however that the so-called 'silent' whistles are not that
> silent at all and you would be berated for blowing it at 1.00am but I
> unscrewed my whistle and removed the 'barrel' and just blow through the
> 'reed-end' and all we hear is a slight rush of air - a bit like blowing
> out forcefully yet the cat hears it as a very loud noise - even up to 500
> yards or more).
> DS N7
>
Yes. Mine it tunable.....It only sounds like an air rush to me, but my cat
comes a runnin' from way up the block when I blow it.

RPSinha
October 27th 07, 01:36 AM
William Graham > wrote:

: Yes. Mine it tunable.....It only sounds like an air rush to me, but my cat
: comes a runnin' from way up the block when I blow it.

Thanks. I get the idea. I'll look for a "dog" whistle that produces as
little human-audible sound as possible. A few hundred yards is plenty
of range.

Upscale
October 27th 07, 07:55 AM
"RPSinha" > wrote in message
> : Yes. Mine it tunable.....It only sounds like an air rush to me, but my
cat
> : comes a runnin' from way up the block when I blow it.

> Thanks. I get the idea. I'll look for a "dog" whistle that produces as
> little human-audible sound as possible. A few hundred yards is plenty
> of range.

Yes, my dog whistle is tuneable too by screwing or unscrewing the mouthpiece
into the body. I did notice when watching my cat that certain settings had
more of an effect on her than others, so I'd guess that certain frequencies
of sound would work better than others when trying to train your cat to come
when a whistle is blown.

May 7th 14, 02:37 PM

dgk
May 9th 14, 02:49 PM
On Wed, 7 May 2014 06:37:15 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

My cats know that when I clap my hands it's time to come in. Usually
they do so. But I'm not aware of anything like a dog whistle for cats.

buglady[_2_]
May 9th 14, 03:18 PM
On 5/9/2014 9:49 AM, dgk wrote:
> On Wed, 7 May 2014 06:37:15 -0700 (PDT),
> wrote:
>
> My cats know that when I clap my hands it's time to come in. Usually
> they do so. But I'm not aware of anything like a dog whistle for cats.

.............Clicker?? Cats can be clicker trained. Some of mine come
when called. When they first come in the house, every time I put food
in front of them I say their name over and over, for months. Soon they
know their name at least. Now, whether or not they're in the mood to
respond, well, that's another matter! I have one I have to round up to
come in for the night. He may take 15 minutes to get to me, but always
comes in the end. Then he has to run out in the street and roll around
for me to pick him up.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

(PeteCresswell)
May 9th 14, 07:59 PM
Per buglady:
>............Clicker?? Cats can be clicker trained. Some of mine come
>when called. When they first come in the house, every time I put food
>in front of them I say their name over and over, for months. Soon they
>know their name at least. Now, whether or not they're in the mood to
>respond, well, that's another matter! I have one I have to round up to
>come in for the night. He may take 15 minutes to get to me, but always
>comes in the end. Then he has to run out in the street and roll around
>for me to pick him up.

We did something like that using cat junk food.

Originally, it was a means to herd the cat into the rec room where it
spends the night. We would put a few pellets of junk food on the plate
along with the regular stuff, let it get a taste, and then walk the
plate down to the rec room.

Now, at 18:30 or so this thing is all over us to get on with it... It
*wants* to go down there.

I don't know what they put in that stuff but our cat sure does like it.

So... if it gets out of the house at dusk or after dark, I just grab a
container of cat junk food and shake it. Cat hears the noise and come
*running*.
--
Pete Cresswell

Christina Websell
June 16th 14, 12:15 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 7 May 2014 06:37:15 -0700 (PDT),
> wrote:
>
> My cats know that when I clap my hands it's time to come in. Usually
> they do so. But I'm not aware of anything like a dog whistle for cats.

I whistle for boyfie sometimes, four part tune that I can do without
artificial means.
He almost always appears very quickly because I sometimes whistle the same
tune when I am about to serve up his dinner. On purpose, because he is a
greedy boy and soon learned that my whistle can mean food.
Sometimes I just want him in so he never knows if he'll be lucky but he
hardly ever risks not coming in just in case his plate is full ;-)
I usually give him a few sprinkles (very few) to make it worth his while
coming to the whistle.