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John Bartley K7AAY
November 2nd 07, 01:23 AM
Cat #1: "Mickie" 12 y.o.Scottish Fold polydactyl neutered female, my
wife's since before marriage. She had a three cat household, but the
other two neutered male Siamese died of old age related causes. So, we
replaced them with:

Cat #2: "Fast Eddie" 3 y.o. domestic short hair neutered male, nephew
to Cat #1. Ears short, not folded. Born in a horse trailer, had
giardia when we got him, so lots of care and nursing until that was
cured. Top Cat in the house; very vocal, very adventurous, the only
one of the three who pushes the envelope and sneaks outdoors. He plays
too hard with #1 and #3.

#1 and #2 use three litter boxes on the ground floor of our 1,800 sq
ft split level.

Cat #3: "Angelus" 3 y.o. longhair neutered male, looks like a flame
point Siamese. We got him to soak up some of #2's energy and to keep
#2 from playing so rough with #1, which has not worked well. A claw
injury tore an eyelid on #3 before we got him was corrected at the
vet, but his vision ain't what it should be. He is phobic about
heights (very un-Siamese!) and definately not the sharpest knife in
the drawer. In the past year, he's gotten positively phobic about #2
to the point of constantly living under our bed, and even
inappropriate elimination. He hid and stopped taking care of himself
for a while, with impacted glands; took him to the vet to clean him up
and give him a 'lion cut' We gave him his own space; 20 hrs a day he
has the bedroom, bathroom and litter dome in the bath to roam, with
the other two cats locked out. He will come out, mostly at night,
knead the covers on top of us, sleep on top of us, and move back and
forth from one to the other of us as if to see who's warmer.

Feliway has not been effective in quelling the combat. We have three
of the wall-socket dispensers and keep them loaded and dispensing
whatever that stuff is.

We've been thinking about gettting #2 a puppy to play with, since he
obviously thinks he's a labrador retreiver.

However, in seriousness, we will have to get rid of one of #2 or #3 if
we can't get #2 to mellow out.

Your on-topic suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
..

John Doe
November 2nd 07, 06:26 AM
John Bartley K7AAY > wrote:

> ... #2 from playing so rough with #1, which has not worked well.
> A claw injury tore an eyelid on #3 before we got him was corrected
> at the vet, but his vision ain't what it should be. He is phobic
> about heights (very un-Siamese!) and definately not the sharpest
> knife in the drawer. In the past year, he's gotten positively
> phobic about #2 to the point of constantly living under our bed,
> and even inappropriate elimination. He hid and stopped taking care
> of himself for a while, with impacted glands; took him to the vet
> to clean him up and give him a 'lion cut' We gave him his own
> space;

I think that's very good. Cats love to run away from things they
don't like. They can't do that indoors. A hostile environment
probably causes major stress to an indoor cat.

Cats don't take conventional discipline well, you have to adjust
things. One thing I would do for sure is keep #2's claws trimmed.

> We've been thinking about gettting #2 a puppy to play with, since
> he obviously thinks he's a labrador retreiver.

lol

I have one that is incredibly playful and incredibly affectionate.
He is getting neutered so I can allow him to cohabitate with my
feral female (will be spayed when I think she won't have a heart
attack). His claws will be kept trimmed and hers will be kept sharp
so she can slap him as needed. I doubt she will play much, but I'm
keeping him off of the bed, so, hopefully they will at least snuggle
this winter.

Good luck.

John Bartley K7AAY
November 2nd 07, 08:36 PM
On Nov 1, 10:26 pm, John Doe > wrote:

> Cats don't take conventional discipline well, you have to adjust
> things. One thing I would do for sure is keep #2's claws trimmed.

Can't do much about his fangs, though.


Any solutions?

John Doe
November 9th 07, 06:45 AM
I wrote:

> I have one that is incredibly playful and incredibly affectionate.
> He is getting neutered so I can allow him to cohabitate with my
> feral female ...

In her behavior is apparently a little less paranoia towards me, a
pleasant surprise. So far it's all good between the two with lots of
back-and-forth physical and vocal activity, some energetic duets
(she needed one of her own kind, unlike my last spayed female Kiki),
and no hissing or fighting. She still has her own room for whenever
she might need a break. Keeping my fingers crossed mainly that she
can at least enjoy his company. I don't expect her to play (she was
probably a kitten factory outside, and grew up quickly), but
hopefully she won't be turned off by the fact he is not virile.









--
by the way, there may or may not be a solution to the aggression
problem... cats are emotionally complex IMO, you have to settle for
workarounds sometimes (like adjusting their environment, or
whatever)

John Doe
November 10th 07, 06:36 AM
When they were together having a great time, she started screaming
as if she were the loser in a fight. So then I walk into the room to
shew Kitty away and see what's going on. She's in her loft/perch
rubbing her head and stuff around as if she's pleasantly excited.
She stops because I entered the room. So I start singing softly
"it's okay..." (over and over again, like a mantra) to her and she
starts doing the head rub stuff again. Normally she wouldn't move or
at most turn her head very slowly in one direction or the other
while I'm there. Maybe my correction of the situation is enough,
also keeping them separated when I'm away.