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View Full Version : Is there a better way to have cats put to sleep?


somebody
December 10th 07, 03:52 AM
I have two cats which are getting along in years. They both are
relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. My concern
is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
traumatic trip to the vets office. I'm thinking maybe I could give them a
muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. Is there anything
recommended for this purpose? Perhaps something that would put them to
sleep? Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?


-Thanks

somebody
December 10th 07, 04:18 AM
On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 22:58:42 -0500, Matthew wrote:

>>
> Many vets come to your house


I've never heard of that.

Noon Cat Nick
December 10th 07, 04:25 AM
somebody wrote:

> On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 22:58:42 -0500, Matthew wrote:
>
>
>>Many vets come to your house
>
>
>
> I've never heard of that.

I have. Mine does.

MaryL
December 10th 07, 04:47 AM
"somebody" > wrote in message
...
>I have two cats which are getting along in years. They both are
> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. My concern
> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> traumatic trip to the vets office. I'm thinking maybe I could give them a
> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. Is there anything
> recommended for this purpose? Perhaps something that would put them to
> sleep? Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
>
> -Thanks
>

Don't try to do this yourself with over-the-counter medication or even a
friend's advice. You are more likely to prolong the process and cause
unncecessary pain.

Many veterinarians will come to your home. That would be your best option
because your babies would be in their normal environment. If your vet does
not make home visits for this purpose, you might want to consider what I did
in the past (before I knew about asking a vet to come to the home). That
is, I made arrangements to take my cat immediately to the examining room so
she would not undergo the stress of waiting in the vicinity of other
animals. They gave me a few minutes alone while I held her in my lap, and
then I continued to hold and stroke her while the vet administered the
medication. I have had to do this twice, and neither cat showed any signs
of pain or fear. It was extremely painful for me, but I considered it the
final gift of love to hold my furbabies during their last moments. You
might want to ask a friend or family member to go with you.

Thank you for thinking ahead for the sake of your cat. You may find -- as I
did -- that it really won't be traumatic for your cat even if you have to go
to the vet clinic because your baby may not be very active or alert at that
time. It certainly wouldn't hurt to ask your vet about giving a
tranquilizer before the trip if you think that would be extremely stressful.
But, as I said earlier, *don't* try to medicate with over-the-counter pills.

MaryL

bookie
December 10th 07, 02:32 PM
On 10 Dec, 04:47, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "somebody" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> >I have two cats which are getting along in years. They both are
> > relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
> > Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. My concern
> > is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> > traumatic trip to the vets office. I'm thinking maybe I could give them a
> > muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. Is there anything
> > recommended for this purpose? Perhaps something that would put them to
> > sleep? Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
> > -Thanks
>
> Don't try to do this yourself with over-the-counter medication or even a
> friend's advice. You are more likely to prolong the process and cause
> unncecessary pain.
>
> Many veterinarians will come to your home. That would be your best option
> because your babies would be in their normal environment. If your vet does
> not make home visits for this purpose, you might want to consider what I did
> in the past (before I knew about asking a vet to come to the home). That
> is, I made arrangements to take my cat immediately to the examining room so
> she would not undergo the stress of waiting in the vicinity of other
> animals. They gave me a few minutes alone while I held her in my lap, and
> then I continued to hold and stroke her while the vet administered the
> medication. I have had to do this twice, and neither cat showed any signs
> of pain or fear. It was extremely painful for me, but I considered it the
> final gift of love to hold my furbabies during their last moments. You
> might want to ask a friend or family member to go with you.
>
> Thank you for thinking ahead for the sake of your cat. You may find -- as I
> did -- that it really won't be traumatic for your cat even if you have to go
> to the vet clinic because your baby may not be very active or alert at that
> time. It certainly wouldn't hurt to ask your vet about giving a
> tranquilizer before the trip if you think that would be extremely stressful.
> But, as I said earlier, *don't* try to medicate with over-the-counter pills.
>
> MaryL

some vets may charge you about 10 extra to come out but that is a
small price to pay to give your loved one a decent and less stressful
send off.

if i had known that our last trip to the vet for jasper would be his
last few moments on this earth i woud have organised for the vet to
come to us, whatever the cost.

if i get the chance to have control over the final moments of any of
mine i will definitely get the vet out to me

bookie

T
December 10th 07, 07:24 PM
In article >,
says...
> I have two cats which are getting along in years. They both are
> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. My concern
> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> traumatic trip to the vets office. I'm thinking maybe I could give them a
> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. Is there anything
> recommended for this purpose? Perhaps something that would put them to
> sleep? Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
>
> -Thanks
>
>

There are traveling vets in many communities. Check the phone book.

MaryL
December 10th 07, 10:07 PM
"somebody" > wrote in message
...
>I have two cats which are getting along in years. They both are
> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. My concern
> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> traumatic trip to the vets office. I'm thinking maybe I could give them a
> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. Is there anything
> recommended for this purpose? Perhaps something that would put them to
> sleep? Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
>
> -Thanks
>

One question that I didn't think of earlier: What do you mean by "getting
on in years"? Cat can live much longer (and healthier) lives than many
people realize. I had one cat that lived almost 20 years. My next cat
lived 16 years. Holly is now 12-1/2 years, and there is nothing "senior"
about her. Duffy is about 9 years old. They are both active, healthy,
playful cats. So, are you talking about a 19-year-old or something much
younger? You may have many more years left than you realize.

MaryL

CatNipped[_2_]
December 10th 07, 10:57 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
. ..
>
> "somebody" > wrote in message
> ...
>>I have two cats which are getting along in years. They both are
>> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to
>> sleep.
>> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. My concern
>> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
>> traumatic trip to the vets office. I'm thinking maybe I could give them
>> a
>> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. Is there anything
>> recommended for this purpose? Perhaps something that would put them to
>> sleep? Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>>
>>
>> -Thanks
>>
>
> One question that I didn't think of earlier: What do you mean by "getting
> on in years"? Cat can live much longer (and healthier) lives than many
> people realize. I had one cat that lived almost 20 years. My next cat
> lived 16 years. Holly is now 12-1/2 years, and there is nothing "senior"
> about her. Duffy is about 9 years old. They are both active, healthy,
> playful cats. So, are you talking about a 19-year-old or something much
> younger? You may have many more years left than you realize.
>
> MaryL

Bandit lived to be 17.5 years old, but she didn't die of old age, she had a
brain tumor that took her sight for almost 2 years (and she managed that
just fine), and eventually killed her (well, Dr. French came to the house to
administer euthanasia, but she was in her last extremities when he did).

Hugs,

CatNipped

IBen Getiner
December 11th 07, 09:49 AM
On Dec 9, 10:52�pm, somebody > wrote:
> I have two cats which are getting along in years. �They both are
> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. �My concern
> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> traumatic trip to the vets office. �I'm thinking maybe I could give them a
> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. �Is there anything
> recommended for this purpose? �Perhaps something that would put them to
> sleep? �Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
> -Thanks

You could try lethal injection, but the Supreme Court is still out on
that one. Do you know anyone with a large constrictor-type snake? It
might be a little painful but at least you'd know your pet was helping
to substain the food-chain...


IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner
December 11th 07, 09:52 AM
On Dec 10, 2:27�pm, Euker Voorn > wrote:
> On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 22:52:15 -0500, somebody > wrote:
> >I have two cats which are getting along in years. �They both are
> >relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep..
> >Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done.
>
> You come across very enthusiastic though. Ever though about letting
> them grow old and die naturally?

Yeah, but if it needs long-term kidney treatment and you can't afford
it, you could go to jail. No ****. It happened not too long ago. This
is the kind of world that the animal rights wack-os have ushered in.
Like it...? Now it's better all around just to put them to sleep.


IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner
December 11th 07, 09:53 AM
On Dec 10, 5:57�pm, "CatNipped" > wrote:
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
>
> . ..
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > "somebody" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>I have two cats which are getting along in years. �They both are
> >> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to
> >> sleep.
> >> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. �My concern
> >> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> >> traumatic trip to the vets office. �I'm thinking maybe I could give them
> >> a
> >> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. �Is there anything
> >> recommended for this purpose? �Perhaps something that would put them to
> >> sleep? �Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
> >> -Thanks
>
> > One question that I didn't think of earlier: �What do you mean by "getting
> > on in years"? �Cat can live much longer (and healthier) lives than many
> > people realize. �I had one cat that lived almost 20 years. �My next cat
> > lived 16 years. �Holly is now 12-1/2 years, and there is nothing "senior"
> > about her. �Duffy is about 9 years old. �They are both active, healthy,
> > playful cats. �So, are you talking about a 19-year-old or something much
> > younger? �You may have many more years left than you realize.
>
> > MaryL
>
> Bandit lived to be 17.5 years old, but she didn't die of old age, she had a
> brain tumor that took her sight for almost 2 years (and she managed that
> just fine), and eventually killed her (well, Dr. French came to the house to
> administer euthanasia, but she was in her last extremities when he did).
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

They **** on the floor right where they're standing. They can't get up
when they fall down. They go blind. Deaf. Crazy and worse. And people
like you just keep on a-sayin'.... Let it go on...


IBen

IBen Getiner
December 11th 07, 09:55 AM
On Dec 10, 5:57�pm, "CatNipped" > wrote:
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
>
> . ..
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > "somebody" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>I have two cats which are getting along in years. �They both are
> >> relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to
> >> sleep.
> >> Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done. �My concern
> >> is for my cats though -- I don't their last memory in life being a
> >> traumatic trip to the vets office. �I'm thinking maybe I could give them
> >> a
> >> muscle relaxer, or something, when it's their time. �Is there anything
> >> recommended for this purpose? �Perhaps something that would put them to
> >> sleep? �Maybe over the counter sleeping pills?
>
> >> -Thanks
>
> > One question that I didn't think of earlier: �What do you mean by "getting
> > on in years"? �Cat can live much longer (and healthier) lives than many
> > people realize. �I had one cat that lived almost 20 years. �My next cat
> > lived 16 years. �Holly is now 12-1/2 years, and there is nothing "senior"
> > about her. �Duffy is about 9 years old. �They are both active, healthy,
> > playful cats. �So, are you talking about a 19-year-old or something much
> > younger? �You may have many more years left than you realize.
>
> > MaryL
>
> Bandit lived to be 17.5 years old, but she didn't die of old age, she had a
> brain tumor that took her sight for almost 2 years (and she managed that
> just fine), and eventually killed her (well, Dr. French came to the house to
> administer euthanasia, but she was in her last extremities when he did).
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I've made up my mind. You're an evil person.



IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner
December 12th 07, 04:08 AM
On Dec 11, 8:02�am, Euker Voorn > wrote:
> On Tue, 11 Dec 2007 01:52:08 -0800 (PST),IBenGetiner
>
> > wrote:
> >On Dec 10, 2:27?pm, Euker Voorn > wrote:
> >> On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 22:52:15 -0500, somebody > wrote:
> >> >I have two cats which are getting along in years. ?They both are
> >> >relatively healthy, but I know soon I will have to have them put to sleep.
> >> >Putting my former cat was the hardest thing I've ever done.
>
> >> You come across very enthusiastic though. Ever though about letting
> >> them grow old and die naturally?
>
> >Yeah, but if it needs long-term kidney treatment and you can't afford
> >it, you could go to jail. No ****. It happened not too long ago. This
> >is the kind of world that the animal rights wack-os have ushered in.
> >Like it...? Now it's better all around just to put them to sleep.
>
> Yes but when the time is right.

Good question. When you have something better to spend your money on,
Id say. Or if they're in perpetual misery... If it's your cat, then
you're God. You figure it out..


IBen Getiner