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RPSinha
December 12th 07, 09:53 AM
I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
bit reserved.

As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.

0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
moody.

1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)

2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
least a few crumbs of something.

3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
startled. How to discourage that?

5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.

When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)

6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.

Question: Up to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
precipitation.

Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
has any really warm spots.)

7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
things essential or gimmicks?

8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
those harmful to her?

Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!

studio
December 12th 07, 12:38 PM
On Dec 12, 3:53 am, RPSinha > wrote:
> 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> again.

lol...you're new at being a doorman aren't you?

> 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> not hungry.

Resist temptation to feed her every time.
She is not active and doesn't need it...you are right, she is eating
out of
boredom.

> 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> startled. How to discourage that?

Discourage play? Better to warn your visitors, or put her in a
seperate
room until your visitors have had a chance to sit down.

> The railing is
> only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
> (Question: Was I right to worry about
> her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)

Chances are, she isn't going to fall. But even if she did, those claws
come
out to grab the wood...or even the ice to save them.
Nothing to be overly concerned about.

> Question: Up to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> doormat.)

Depends on her coat. Is she long hair, medium long, short, or
hairless?
Depends on wind speed and temperture.
If it is too cold, she will seek shelter nearby some where to get out
of
the wind and cold.

A better rule of thumb would be what her purpose of going outside is.
If she is just going to the bathroom, give her 5-10-15 minutes
dependent
on wind and temperture, and call her back inside.

0-20F degrees ...5 minutes
20-30F degress ...10-15 minutes

> Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> has any really warm spots.)

Easy, make her a warm dry spot, so you don't have to guess.
If they have such a spot, even tempretures below freezing can
be tolerated well.

My Big Mama cat has her own house I built her for emergencies.
Her house is fully insulated, but unheated.
You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the bottom
inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or buy a
specialty
pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help keep
the
wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
If you really want fancy; some people put heating pads in to keep it
nice and toasty.

> 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> things essential or gimmicks?

Most cats will use them at least part of the time.
Place it in a quiet part of the room...or even inside a cardboard
box...cats
love being a bit secluded.

> 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> those harmful to her?

Probably not.

bookie
December 12th 07, 12:58 PM
On 12 Dec, 08:53, RPSinha > wrote:
> I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> bit reserved.
>
> As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> moody.
>
> 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> least a few crumbs of something.
>
> 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> startled. How to discourage that?
>
> 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> precipitation.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> has any really warm spots.)
>
> 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> things essential or gimmicks?
>
> 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> those harmful to her?
>
> Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!

nice to hear that you are concerned and askign questions instead of
just slinging her out as some people would do

if you are concerned about her being shut out for any length of time
with no shelter thne just get her a kennel or somethign to hide in
until you come back, i am sure there are some for sale at your local
'petsmart' or 'pets at home' or whatever you have over there, there
were some igloo things i saw last winter for sale at pets at home over
here which are supposed to trap the cats body heat, they were made of
a thick insulating plastic and were a bit raised off the ground to
allow the cat to be off the cold floor, and to stop water flooding in
too i suppose. they are relatively cheap and will do the trick if you
are worried. also you can get these pads or cushions (snugglesafe is
one make we have over here) which you can put inthe microwave and heat
up and they give off heat for a number ofhours, so you could stick one
of those into the kennel too if you are concerned it is not warm
enough in there.

as for your visitors beign startled when the cat pounces ontheir legs
and feet, well sod them! just warn them iot might happen, this cat is
just playing cos she is a bit bored and she means no harm, i woudl not
discourage her. If anything i would discourage any visitor from coming
around if they are going to get uptight about a small cat being
playful, they obviously have issues which make them uptight about one
of the most wonderful things inthe world; watching a pussycat playing
and having fun.

if you want to buy her a nice bed of her own them do so, again they
can be cheap from a pet shop, ú20 or less.I got mr mcgregor a lovely
one from a cat show at the weekend for ú15, really plush, itis wedged
behind the sofa next to the radiator with him in it now snoring away,
i decided it was best to put it where he likes to sleep anyway so he
definitely sleeps in it. it is not an igloo or dome one, but then he
has alot of his own insulation if you know what i mean :-) terri might
liek an igloo one as she is a bit of a scaredy timid puss, but i have
yet to finds a really nice snug one i think she might like yet.
it seems liek this puss is happy with her cushion which she has chosen
herself, but if you want to give her her own little snuggle spot then
why not? pussycats are there to be pampered and fussed over, that is
why we have them isn't it?

got any photos to share/

bookie

studio
December 12th 07, 02:05 PM
On Dec 12, 6:38 am, studio > wrote:
> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the bottom
> inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or buy a
> specialty
> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help keep
> the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.

Some of the outside houses I found:
http://www.catsplay.com/plastic.php3?sortby=lowprice&id=

If you're good at building things, and have some left over supplies;
it can be a lot cheaper.
I think I spent a total of $16. on the one I built.
I got all the materials from my old job...they would have been thrown
away anyway.
Took me about half a day to build from start to finish.

1. 1/4" thin plywood I got from discarded pallet containers ($0)
2. styrofoam sheets from packing containers (for wall, floor and roof
insulation -$0)
3. 1x2 rough cut wood studs from pallet braces ($0)
4. 3- 3' roofing shingles (given to me by a friend who had extras -
$0)
5. 2- hinges for roof to open and close for cleaning ($4.)
6. wood molding to outline doorway (I had leftover- $0)
7. small nails ($0)
8. adhesive chaulk ($0)
9. extra foam for floor (got out of packages I recieved- $0)
10. faux-sheep-wool flat bed (bought from Walmart...and that was the
major expense of $12.)
11. stain for wood (Ihad leftover- $0)
12. vinyl felt for doorway (had some $0)

It has a flat, very slightly slanted roof...so she has a bed on top
the roof
she can also lay on, and have an unobstructed view from a higher
vantage point.
The floor is also rasied off the ground 1".

Result: A nice house, that can be cleaned easily;
she has had for 8 years now, and has got a lot of use out of.

If it gets too cold, or just wants a quiet soft place to rest...
I know where to find her.

-Lost
December 12th 07, 02:21 PM
Response to studio >:

>> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
>> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
>> buy a specialty
>> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
>> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
>> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.

One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
to drape down in the front.

Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...

....you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

CatNipped[_2_]
December 12th 07, 02:48 PM
"-Lost" > wrote in message
...
> Response to studio >:
>
>>> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
>>> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
>>> buy a specialty
>>> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
>>> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
>>> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>
> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
> to drape down in the front.
>
> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>
> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.

The only thing to remember about using absorbant material either inside the
house or as a wind break is, if it gets wet it will defeat the whole purpose
of providing a warm, dry spot to shelter. Even if you're using a vinyl
flap, if you have a cat bed inside, check it daily for moisture (from dew or
condensation).

A good insulating material for bedding is plain old hay. The air pockets in
hay keep the bedding warm even in the coldest weather and it is cheap and
easy to just replace it when it gets damp. Cats can snuggle down into it
and be protected from the cold on all sides.

We don't live in a cold climate, but we live in a very, very humid one
(which makes what little cold we do get seem 100 times more miserable).
What we've done in the past is to build a "split-level" house. We make the
door just large and high enough to fit a cat, then towards the back have a
"loft" whose floor is about an inch higher than the top of the door so that
even if the vinyl flap gets dislodged, or blown inward by the wind, the
cat's sleeping place is still out of the wind.

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

CatNipped[_2_]
December 12th 07, 02:54 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> "-Lost" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Response to studio >:
>>
>>>> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
>>>> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
>>>> buy a specialty
>>>> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
>>>> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
>>>> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>>
>> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
>> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
>> to drape down in the front.
>>
>> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
>> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>>
>> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
>> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
>> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.
>
> The only thing to remember about using absorbant material either inside
> the house or as a wind break is, if it gets wet it will defeat the whole
> purpose of providing a warm, dry spot to shelter. Even if you're using a
> vinyl flap, if you have a cat bed inside, check it daily for moisture
> (from dew or condensation).
>
> A good insulating material for bedding is plain old hay. The air pockets
> in hay keep the bedding warm even in the coldest weather and it is cheap
> and easy to just replace it when it gets damp. Cats can snuggle down into
> it and be protected from the cold on all sides.
>
> We don't live in a cold climate, but we live in a very, very humid one
> (which makes what little cold we do get seem 100 times more miserable).
> What we've done in the past is to build a "split-level" house. We make
> the door just large and high enough to fit a cat, then towards the back
> have a "loft" whose floor is about an inch higher than the top of the door
> so that even if the vinyl flap gets dislodged, or blown inward by the
> wind, the cat's sleeping place is still out of the wind.

Sorry, that didn't explain it well on reading it back. The loft is actually
built above the door and flush against the inside front of the house, so the
cat walks to the back of the house and then turns around and jumps up
towards and over the door to get in the loft (like a side-ways "U").

Of course, cats being as resourceful as they are they've already discovered
the perfect sleeping spot in our yard - under the deck next to the heated
spa! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped
>
>>
>> --
>> -Lost
>> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
>> kidding. No I am not.
>
>

Upscale
December 12th 07, 03:06 PM
"studio" > wrote in message

> Chances are, she isn't going to fall. But even if she did, those claws
> come out to grab the wood...or even the ice to save them.
> Nothing to be overly concerned about.

Sorry, can't agree with this at all. Many cats are injured or killed each
year by falling off of balconies, railings or whatever. The fall might only
be 2.5 floors down as the OP has said, but that's enough to break some
bones. Go back a few days and you can read how much it cost one person to
get some bones set by a vet.

The OP should find some type of guard to eliminate any chance of that 2.5
floors fall or prevent his cat from going out there.

CatNipped[_2_]
December 12th 07, 03:30 PM
"Upscale" > wrote in message
...
>
> "studio" > wrote in message
>
>> Chances are, she isn't going to fall. But even if she did, those claws
>> come out to grab the wood...or even the ice to save them.
>> Nothing to be overly concerned about.
>
> Sorry, can't agree with this at all. Many cats are injured or killed each
> year by falling off of balconies, railings or whatever. The fall might
> only
> be 2.5 floors down as the OP has said, but that's enough to break some
> bones. Go back a few days and you can read how much it cost one person to
> get some bones set by a vet.
>
> The OP should find some type of guard to eliminate any chance of that 2.5
> floors fall or prevent his cat from going out there.

We spent $400 at the ER, for x-rays, morphine, casting, take-home pain meds
and muscle relaxers to get a broken femur set (Archer panicked when the
garage door started opening and hit his back leg on the doorsill leading
into the house). Then we spent another $100 for a large dog kennel (since
he had to be kept confined for six weeks until the leg healed). Then we
spent $40 for a follow-up visit to his regular vet the next day. Then we
spent $140 for another vet visit after 3 weeks (to take another x-ray and
check how the let was healing) and at that time found that the cast was too
tight so they had to re-cast it. Then another $60 a week later when he
managed to jimmy the cast almost off his leg by sticking it in the bars of
the kennel then turning about and pulling - and at that time they found that
he'd almost flayed the skin on his leg in the process, so needed antibiotics
and more pain meds. Then another visit (no charge) when I say that his toes
and claws were black and rushed him back to the vet thinking the too-tight
cast had cut off circulation and caused gangrene (but the vet "cured" it by
scraping off the dirty tape residue left by the cast. Then another $40
when, after he was let out of the kennel promptly climbed up the tall cat
tree and fell off so needed another x-ray to make sure he didn't re-break
his leg. So it was a total of $780 for vet costs and that wasn't counting
all the PTO days I had to use getting off work for vet visits.

Don't *ever* think cats can't be clumsy - just watch these if you don't
believe it: http://www.possibleplaces.com/ABadCatDay.wmv

Hugs,

CatNipped

honeybunch
December 12th 07, 07:44 PM
On Dec 12, 9:30 am, "CatNipped" > wrote:
> "Upscale" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > "studio" > wrote in message
>
> >> Chances are, she isn't going to fall. But even if she did, those claws
> >> come out to grab the wood...or even the ice to save them.
> >> Nothing to be overly concerned about.
>
> > Sorry, can't agree with this at all. Many cats are injured or killed each
> > year by falling off of balconies, railings or whatever. The fall might
> > only
> > be 2.5 floors down as the OP has said, but that's enough to break some
> > bones. Go back a few days and you can read how much it cost one person to
> > get some bones set by a vet.
>
> > The OP should find some type of guard to eliminate any chance of that 2.5
> > floors fall or prevent his cat from going out there.
>
> We spent $400 at the ER, for x-rays, morphine, casting, take-home pain meds
> and muscle relaxers to get a broken femur set (Archer panicked when the
> garage door started opening and hit his back leg on the doorsill leading
> into the house). Then we spent another $100 for a large dog kennel (since
> he had to be kept confined for six weeks until the leg healed). Then we
> spent $40 for a follow-up visit to his regular vet the next day. Then we
> spent $140 for another vet visit after 3 weeks (to take another x-ray and
> check how the let was healing) and at that time found that the cast was too
> tight so they had to re-cast it. Then another $60 a week later when he
> managed to jimmy the cast almost off his leg by sticking it in the bars of
> the kennel then turning about and pulling - and at that time they found that
> he'd almost flayed the skin on his leg in the process, so needed antibiotics
> and more pain meds. Then another visit (no charge) when I say that his toes
> and claws were black and rushed him back to the vet thinking the too-tight
> cast had cut off circulation and caused gangrene (but the vet "cured" it by
> scraping off the dirty tape residue left by the cast. Then another $40
> when, after he was let out of the kennel promptly climbed up the tall cat
> tree and fell off so needed another x-ray to make sure he didn't re-break
> his leg. So it was a total of $780 for vet costs and that wasn't counting
> all the PTO days I had to use getting off work for vet visits.
>
> Don't *ever* think cats can't be clumsy - just watch these if you don't
> believe it: http://www.possibleplaces.com/ABadCatDay.wmv
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

You are the most wonderful cat sitter in the entire world. That cat
(what is that cat's name anyway?) reminds me of my own cat who came to
me as a stray last year. He really prefers to do his business outside
and not use his litter box either. He is smart enough not to go out
when there is snow on the ground or when it is raining. I dont think
you should let her go out on your porch. She could fall. But as to
being outside in the cold, hey its her choice. She is wearing a nice
fur coat. If she doesn't like it, then next time she won't go. You
really don't have to worry about her feet sticking to the sidewalk or
getting frozen stiff. As for her antics jumping out at your guests
that is really amusing. Just be as sweet to her as possible and
you'll have her eating out of your hand.

William Graham
December 12th 07, 09:56 PM
"RPSinha" > wrote in message
...
>I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> bit reserved.
>
> As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> moody.
>
> 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> least a few crumbs of something.
>
> 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> startled. How to discourage that?
>
> 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> precipitation.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> has any really warm spots.)
>
> 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> things essential or gimmicks?
>
> 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> those harmful to her?
>
> Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!

Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer" about the
cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the one that led to
Summertime Weather........

studio
December 12th 07, 11:34 PM
On Dec 12, 8:21 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response to studio >:
>
> >> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
> >> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
> >> buy a specialty
> >> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
> >> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
> >> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>
> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
> to drape down in the front.

That would work as a temporary solution, as long as no snow or
rain gets on it.
Also, any tape that holds the box will tend to fail after long
exposure
periods of cold and warm.
The box shouldn't be too large though.

The small wood houses are permanent solutions...plus they're
re-saleable...although don't look for appreciation values. ;)

> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>
> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.

As long as it works to cover the entrance, and keep a bit of heat in.

studio
December 12th 07, 11:43 PM
On Dec 12, 8:05 am, studio > wrote:
> I think I spent a total of $16. on the one I built.
> 5. 2- hinges for roof to open and close for cleaning ($4.)

I was actually quite suprised when I went to clean out Mamas
house after years of fairly heavy use...I just opened the roof
and took the bed out and brushed off some excess fur...
it didn't stink inside or anything...
put the bed back in...good as new.

I did replace the bed after a number of years though.
I really was expecting it to stink in there though...but it didn't.

-Lost
December 13th 07, 01:13 AM
Response to studio >:

> On Dec 12, 8:05 am, studio > wrote:
>> I think I spent a total of $16. on the one I built.
>> 5. 2- hinges for roof to open and close for cleaning ($4.)
>
> I was actually quite suprised when I went to clean out Mamas
> house after years of fairly heavy use...I just opened the roof
> and took the bed out and brushed off some excess fur...
> it didn't stink inside or anything...
> put the bed back in...good as new.
>
> I did replace the bed after a number of years though.
> I really was expecting it to stink in there though...but it didn't.

For some reason this doesn't surprise me.

The more I get to know my beloved (evil (just kidding, he's only
bonkers)) Gabby the more I realize that he can crawl through the
dustiest of spots, slide across the most dog fur-ridden linoleum, and
paw at items under the refrigerator or oven, the more I realize that
he is impervious to dirt.

Seriously though, I do not think I've ever seen a "nasty" looking
cat. (Not counting unhealthy ones.)

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-Lost
December 13th 07, 01:29 AM
Response to "CatNipped" >:

<snip>

> Then another $40
> when, after he was let out of the kennel promptly climbed up the
> tall cat tree and fell off so needed another x-ray to make sure he
> didn't re-break his leg.

<snip>

Every time I hear this story I imagine Archer and the rest of the gang
as Keystone Cops bustling about your house.

Then when Archer falls off the tree, Ozzy, Demi, Jessie, and Samazon
look at the screen and gasp with one paw on their cheek and a subtitle
appears, "Oh no! Chief Archer fell!"

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-Lost
December 13th 07, 01:32 AM
Response to honeybunch >:

> That cat (what is that cat's name anyway?) reminds me of my own
> cat who came to me as a stray last year.

"Archer panicked when the garage door started opening and hit his back
leg on the doorsill leading into the house"

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-Lost
December 13th 07, 01:35 AM
Response to "William Graham" >:

> Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer"
> about the cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the
> one that led to Summertime Weather........

Hrmm... which one?

http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
0345330129

http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
0345413997

The FIRST one looks right (cat on the cover) yet talks about a guy time
traveling.

Or was the cat not the main character?

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

William Graham
December 13th 07, 02:17 AM
"studio" > wrote in message
...
> On Dec 12, 8:21 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
>> Response to studio >:
>>
>> >> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
>> >> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
>> >> buy a specialty
>> >> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
>> >> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
>> >> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>>
>> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
>> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
>> to drape down in the front.
>
> That would work as a temporary solution, as long as no snow or
> rain gets on it.
> Also, any tape that holds the box will tend to fail after long
> exposure
> periods of cold and warm.
> The box shouldn't be too large though.
>
> The small wood houses are permanent solutions...plus they're
> re-saleable...although don't look for appreciation values. ;)
>
>> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
>> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>>
>> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
>> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
>> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.
>
> As long as it works to cover the entrance, and keep a bit of heat in.

Nothing wrong with boarding up the entrance and installing a standard "cat
door" in it. They have a magnetically closed plastic curtain that is
effective in keeping the cold out.

William Graham
December 13th 07, 02:25 AM
"-Lost" > wrote in message
...
> Response to "William Graham" >:
>
>> Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer"
>> about the cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the
>> one that led to Summertime Weather........
>
> Hrmm... which one?
>
> http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
> 0345330129
>
> http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
> 0345413997
>
> The FIRST one looks right (cat on the cover) yet talks about a guy time
> traveling.
>
> Or was the cat not the main character?
This one:

http://www.amazon.com/Door-into-Summer-Robert-Heinlein/dp/0345330129

honeybunch
December 13th 07, 04:39 AM
On Dec 12, 8:25 pm, "William Graham" > wrote:
> "-Lost" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > Response to "William Graham" >:
>
> >> Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer"
> >> about the cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the
> >> one that led to Summertime Weather........
>
> > Hrmm... which one?
>
> >http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
> > 0345330129
>
> >http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
> > 0345413997
>
> > The FIRST one looks right (cat on the cover) yet talks about a guy time
> > traveling.
>
> > Or was the cat not the main character?
>
> This one:
>
> http://www.amazon.com/Door-into-Summer-Robert-Heinlein/dp/0345330129

"Book Description
Dan Davis was tricked by an unscrupulous business partner and a greedy
fiancee into spending thirty years in suspended animation just when he
was on the verge of a success beyond his wildest dreams. But when he
awoke in the future, he discovered he had the means to travel back in
time -- and get his revenge!" duhhhhh. Mr. Grahamm where is the cat
in this unscrupulous picture?

honeybunch
December 13th 07, 05:08 AM
On Dec 12, 7:35 pm, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response to "William Graham" >:
>
> > Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer"
> > about the cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the
> > one that led to Summertime Weather........
>
> Hrmm... which one?
>
> http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
> 0345330129
>
> http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
> 0345413997
>
> The FIRST one looks right (cat on the cover) yet talks about a guy time
> traveling.
>
> Or was the cat not the main character?
>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Door_into_Summer

-Lost
December 13th 07, 07:41 AM
Response to honeybunch >:

> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Door_into_Summer

Jeeeez, how many copies of this book have been made (by the same
author)?

Thanks for the link!

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

AKT
December 13th 07, 08:03 AM
studio > wrote:

: lol...you're new at being a doorman aren't you?

It became especially intense once the weather turned arctic.

: Resist temptation to feed her every time.

We compromise with her 1/2 way. What I try to do is to divide up the
same food in more snacks.

: Discourage play? Better to warn your visitors...

Yeah, don't know what I was thinking. I thought there might be a way to
"request" her that is ok to ambush us but not others. Maybe not. :)

: A better rule of thumb would be what her purpose of going outside is.
: If she is just going to the bathroom, give her 5-10-15 minutes
: dependent on wind and temperture, and call her back inside.

Maybe I'll better but so far I really can't tell when she intends to
only go bathroom and return soon, and when she wants to goof around
outdoors. I am also not very successful at "calling her back". Once I
let her out, she returns when she feels like it.

So our decision is only to let her out or not. Of course, when we are
going to be home we let her out and she can come in whenever she wants,
at most she has to wait a few minutes at the door before we notice her.
(she climbs to the window, which is pretty visible from many angles
inside, and makes a great spectacle of herself).

The tough part is deciding when we are going to be away for a chunk of
time: should we leave her in (with litter box, some snack) or out?
There is no doubt that she would like to be left out but in bad whether
she may regret it when she want to come in and can't.

(One mystery in the puzzle is that her old house has a cat door, so she
could go there and be safe, but as far as we can tell she has stopped
going there. I tried leaving her favorite kibble inside and it was
untouched. I don't know if she'll remember to go there if she was
uncomfortable outside.)

So far we have have locked her in a few times and she has been upset
with us later, refusing to talk or play for several hours. The mood
resets itself by 4-5AM next morning :)

RPSinha
December 13th 07, 08:06 AM
AKT > wrote:

....

Sorry, that got posted from a family member's account. No big deal but
didn't want to confuse anyone.

IBen Getiner[_2_]
December 13th 07, 08:08 AM
On Dec 12, 3:53´┐Żam, RPSinha > wrote:
> I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> bit reserved.
>
> As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> moody.
>
> 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> least a few crumbs of something.
>
> 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> startled. How to discourage that?
>
> 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> Question: ´┐ŻUp to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> precipitation.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> has any really warm spots.)
>
> 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> things essential or gimmicks?
>
> 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> those harmful to her?
>
> Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!

You obviously like to take things very seriously. I see that you tend
to compensate for your insecurities by talking a lot. Do you realize
this....? Because none of your concerns are well-founded. Not in my
opinion.


IBen Getiner

RPSinha
December 13th 07, 08:28 AM
In article IBen Getiner > wrote:

: You obviously like to take things very seriously. I see that you tend
: to compensate for your insecurities by talking a lot. Do you realize
: this....? Because none of your concerns are well-founded. Not in my
: opinion.

One of the pleasures of Usenet is that we meet all kinds. :)

Stan Brown
December 13th 07, 10:05 AM
Wed, 12 Dec 2007 18:35:44 -0600 from -Lost
>:
> Response to "William Graham" >:
>
> > Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer"
> > about the cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the
> > one that led to Summertime Weather........
>
> Hrmm... which one?
>
> The FIRST one looks right (cat on the cover) yet talks about a guy time
> traveling.
>
> Or was the cat not the main character?

The cat was the sidekick of the main character, who was a time-
traveling man.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"If there's one thing I know, it's men. I ought to: it's
been my life work." -- Marie Dressler, in /Dinner at Eight/

bookie
December 13th 07, 12:46 PM
On 13 Dec, 01:17, "William Graham" > wrote:
> "studio" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Dec 12, 8:21 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
> >> Response to studio >:
>
> >> >> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
> >> >> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
> >> >> buy a specialty
> >> >> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
> >> >> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
> >> >> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>
> >> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
> >> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
> >> to drape down in the front.
>
> > That would work as a temporary solution, as long as no snow or
> > rain gets on it.
> > Also, any tape that holds the box will tend to fail after long
> > exposure
> > periods of cold and warm.
> > The box shouldn't be too large though.
>
> > The small wood houses are permanent solutions...plus they're
> > re-saleable...although don't look for appreciation values. ;)
>
> >> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
> >> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>
> >> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
> >> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
> >> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.
>
> > As long as it works to cover the entrance, and keep a bit of heat in.
>
> Nothing wrong with boarding up the entrance and installing a standard "cat
> door" in it. They have a magnetically closed plastic curtain that is
> effective in keeping the cold out.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

good point well presented.

the one i was thinking of was shown onthat website and is called the
Kat Kabin or something, it is made of plastic so therefore it will not
rot or pickup moisture or get socked like a cardboard box or whatever
else someone suggested earlier, AND it is raised off the ground so
keeping it a bit warming by keepignit off the cold ground, AND
stopping it getting flooded inside. you could also put some dry
bedding in there on a daily basis for extra snuggliness, not sure how
you would close off the entrance to keep heat in, maybe drape some
sheets of clear plastic over the front? obviously with a split down
the middle to allow access.

just don'tdo anything daft like give him/her a cardboard box to hide
in outside as that will just get soaked and do more harm than good

bookie

bookie
December 13th 07, 12:55 PM
On 13 Dec, 07:03, AKT > wrote:
> studio > wrote:
>
> : lol...you're new at being a doorman aren't you?
>
> It became especially intense once the weather turned arctic.
>
> : Resist temptation to feed her every time.
>
> We compromise with her 1/2 way. What I try to do is to divide up the
> same food in more snacks.
>
> : Discourage play? Better to warn your visitors...
>
> Yeah, don't know what I was thinking. I thought there might be a way to
> "request" her that is ok to ambush us but not others. Maybe not. :)
>
> : A better rule of thumb would be what her purpose of going outside is.
> : If she is just going to the bathroom, give her 5-10-15 minutes
> : dependent on wind and temperture, and call her back inside.
>
> Maybe I'll better but so far I really can't tell when she intends to
> only go bathroom and return soon, and when she wants to goof around
> outdoors. I am also not very successful at "calling her back". Once I
> let her out, she returns when she feels like it.
>
> So our decision is only to let her out or not. Of course, when we are
> going to be home we let her out and she can come in whenever she wants,
> at most she has to wait a few minutes at the door before we notice her.
> (she climbs to the window, which is pretty visible from many angles
> inside, and makes a great spectacle of herself).
>
> The tough part is deciding when we are going to be away for a chunk of
> time: should we leave her in (with litter box, some snack) or out?
> There is no doubt that she would like to be left out but in bad whether
> she may regret it when she want to come in and can't.
>
> (One mystery in the puzzle is that her old house has a cat door, so she
> could go there and be safe, but as far as we can tell she has stopped
> going there. I tried leaving her favorite kibble inside and it was
> untouched. I don't know if she'll remember to go there if she was
> uncomfortable outside.)
>
> So far we have have locked her in a few times and she has been upset
> with us later, refusing to talk or play for several hours. The mood
> resets itself by 4-5AM next morning :)

1) maybe only let her outside for a pee just before she is due to be
fed, or her dinner time, that way she willhave to return as she will
be hungry

2) don't let her out when you are going to be away for any length of
time and it is cold outside. We have no cat flap in our house due to
having a double glazed back door (we would have a tunnel or something
built in the back wall or maybe replace said back door in order to
accommodate a flap but it is not my house, we are renting, so cannot
do either) so the cats can only go in or out when someone is home to
let them and they have learnt this. sometimes in the summer whenit is
really warm and it is definitely not going to rain (about 2 days in
mid august here in england) have i left them outside and locked the
back door whilst i go out and then that is only for a few hours whilst
i pop to the shops or something, never longer than that. that is
usually cos one of them is sleeping onthe lawn or under a bush and
will be there for a while and it would be rude to disturb them, so i
leave them be. usually they are in exactly the same place and position
when i return, still sound asleep, so no harm done usually.
yes she may strop for a bit but you will have to exercise tough love,
it is for her own good, she will get used to it after a while and find
distractions indoor, ro just sleep as most cats do.

bookie

IBen Getiner
December 13th 07, 12:56 PM
On Dec 13, 2:28´┐Żam, RPSinha > wrote:
> In article IBen Getiner > wrote:
>
> : You obviously like to take things very seriously. ´┐ŻI see that you tend
> : to compensate for your insecurities by talking a lot. Do you realize
> : this....? Because none of your concerns are well-founded. Not in my
> : opinion.
>
> One of the pleasures of Usenet is that we meet all kinds. :)

All you have to do for that pleasure is to peer into your bathroom
mirror in the morning.
Why do you ramble on and on when you have so little to say? Does this
sound familiar...? I can't imagine how it couldn't. It's probably the
one most oft repeated criticism of your entire life.


IBen

CatNipped[_2_]
December 13th 07, 03:09 PM
"-Lost" > wrote in message
...
> Response to "CatNipped" >:
>
> <snip>
>
>> Then another $40
>> when, after he was let out of the kennel promptly climbed up the
>> tall cat tree and fell off so needed another x-ray to make sure he
>> didn't re-break his leg.
>
> <snip>
>
> Every time I hear this story I imagine Archer and the rest of the gang
> as Keystone Cops bustling about your house.
>
> Then when Archer falls off the tree, Ozzy, Demi, Jessie, and Samazon
> look at the screen and gasp with one paw on their cheek and a subtitle
> appears, "Oh no! Chief Archer fell!"

ROTFLOL! You hit the nail on the head - that's exactly how they act. You
should see them when Ozzy is in the process of prying the lid off the cat
treats can - they run around chasing him, he's trying to run away and open
the can at the same time, they're running into things and each other. I
watch it all and think, "Cat, thy name is grace - NOT!" ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

CatNipped[_2_]
December 13th 07, 03:11 PM
"-Lost" > wrote in message
...
> Response to honeybunch >:
>
>> That cat (what is that cat's name anyway?) reminds me of my own
>> cat who came to me as a stray last year.
>
> "Archer panicked when the garage door started opening and hit his back
> leg on the doorsill leading into the house"
>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

I think she was referring to the post above mine about the person who is
cat-sitting for a neighbor.

Hugs,

CatNipped

-Lost
December 13th 07, 03:17 PM
Response to bookie >:

<snip>

>> >> >> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line
>> >> >> the bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old
>> >> >> blankets...or buy a specialty
>> >> >> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
>> >> >> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to
>> >> >> help keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>>
>> >> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
>> >> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a
>> >> little to drape down in the front.

<snip>

> just don'tdo anything daft like give him/her a cardboard box to
> hide in outside as that will just get soaked and do more harm than
> good

I actually meant this to be in addition to or instead of your "line
the bottom inside with foam..."

It's ridiculous to think that I meant, stick a cardboard box in the
snow.

Perhaps I could have worded it better...

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-Lost
December 13th 07, 03:29 PM
Response to "CatNipped" >:

> I think she was referring to the post above mine about the person
> who is cat-sitting for a neighbor.

Jeez... I think this bug (streptococcus) is spreading to my brain.
Ignore me!

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

Baldoni[_4_]
December 13th 07, 06:41 PM
RPSinha explained on 12/12/2007 :
> I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> bit reserved.
>
> As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> moody.
>
> 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> least a few crumbs of something.
>
> 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> startled. How to discourage that?
>
> 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> precipitation.
>
> Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> has any really warm spots.)
>
> 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> things essential or gimmicks?
>
> 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> those harmful to her?
>
> Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!

In the winter of 1942 my grandfather was with the 17th Army in Russia
before things took a turn for the worse. However he had a cat they
named Josolph (which was made up from Stalin and Hitler's christian
names) who they fed soup which was laced with alchohol of some
description for sustinance.

Josef was with them for about 2 years and was handed over to nurses
after the army split and grandfather headed south. The cat stood up to
the cold, why wouldn't he being Russian and all. But the soup
fortified him and when he was not inside the "half track" he amused the
officer by chasing birds and burrowing in the snow.

--
Count Baldoni

William Graham
December 13th 07, 11:17 PM
"bookie" > wrote in message
...
> On 13 Dec, 01:17, "William Graham" > wrote:
>> "studio" > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Dec 12, 8:21 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
>> >> Response to studio >:
>>
>> >> >> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
>> >> >> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
>> >> >> buy a specialty
>> >> >> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
>> >> >> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
>> >> >> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>>
>> >> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
>> >> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
>> >> to drape down in the front.
>>
>> > That would work as a temporary solution, as long as no snow or
>> > rain gets on it.
>> > Also, any tape that holds the box will tend to fail after long
>> > exposure
>> > periods of cold and warm.
>> > The box shouldn't be too large though.
>>
>> > The small wood houses are permanent solutions...plus they're
>> > re-saleable...although don't look for appreciation values. ;)
>>
>> >> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
>> >> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>>
>> >> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
>> >> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
>> >> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.
>>
>> > As long as it works to cover the entrance, and keep a bit of heat in.
>>
>> Nothing wrong with boarding up the entrance and installing a standard
>> "cat
>> door" in it. They have a magnetically closed plastic curtain that is
>> effective in keeping the cold out.- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> good point well presented.
>
> the one i was thinking of was shown onthat website and is called the
> Kat Kabin or something, it is made of plastic so therefore it will not
> rot or pickup moisture or get socked like a cardboard box or whatever
> else someone suggested earlier, AND it is raised off the ground so
> keeping it a bit warming by keepignit off the cold ground, AND
> stopping it getting flooded inside. you could also put some dry
> bedding in there on a daily basis for extra snuggliness, not sure how
> you would close off the entrance to keep heat in, maybe drape some
> sheets of clear plastic over the front? obviously with a split down
> the middle to allow access.
>
> just don'tdo anything daft like give him/her a cardboard box to hide
> in outside as that will just get soaked and do more harm than good
>
> bookie
But cardboard does work pretty well in an enclosed space, like a garage. I
had a feral cat live in one once in my garage for several months. I
eventually moved her into the house, and we lived together for several
years.....Another thing I did with my present feral cat was put a waterproof
heating pad in a fiberglass cat carrier and plug it in to an outside AC
source on my back porch....But if you do this make sure the heat is set to
"low", and the AC source is ground-fault protected. - He too, became an
inside cat, and today, he hardly ever goes outside anymore......

William Graham
December 13th 07, 11:22 PM
"honeybunch" > wrote in message
...
> On Dec 12, 8:25 pm, "William Graham" > wrote:
>> "-Lost" > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>> > Response to "William Graham" >:
>>
>> >> Reminds me of the Robert A. Heinlein story, "The Door into Summer"
>> >> about the cat that kept going from door to door, looking for the
>> >> one that led to Summertime Weather........
>>
>> > Hrmm... which one?
>>
>> >http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
>> > 0345330129
>>
>> >http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?id=3975059714973&isbn=
>> > 0345413997
>>
>> > The FIRST one looks right (cat on the cover) yet talks about a guy time
>> > traveling.
>>
>> > Or was the cat not the main character?
>>
>> This one:
>>
>> http://www.amazon.com/Door-into-Summer-Robert-Heinlein/dp/0345330129
>
> "Book Description
> Dan Davis was tricked by an unscrupulous business partner and a greedy
> fiancee into spending thirty years in suspended animation just when he
> was on the verge of a success beyond his wildest dreams. But when he
> awoke in the future, he discovered he had the means to travel back in
> time -- and get his revenge!" duhhhhh. Mr. Grahamm where is the cat
> in this unscrupulous picture?

Don't know....but the story I read had a cat in it.....One of them must be a
book of short stories......

bookie
December 14th 07, 03:01 AM
On 13 Dec, 22:17, "William Graham" > wrote:
> "bookie" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > On 13 Dec, 01:17, "William Graham" > wrote:
> >> "studio" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> >> > On Dec 12, 8:21 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
> >> >> Response to studio >:
>
> >> >> >> You may be able to find a extra small dog house and line the
> >> >> >> bottom inside with foam and a piece or two of old blankets...or
> >> >> >> buy a specialty
> >> >> >> pet bed at Walmart pet section and put it in.
> >> >> >> Staple a thick piece of vinyl or felt over the doorway to help
> >> >> >> keep the wind out, and allow easy enter and exit.
>
> >> >> One idea that I had was to take a large box and staple a small
> >> >> blanket or a large towel into it on all corners, but allow a little
> >> >> to drape down in the front.
>
> >> > That would work as a temporary solution, as long as no snow or
> >> > rain gets on it.
> >> > Also, any tape that holds the box will tend to fail after long
> >> > exposure
> >> > periods of cold and warm.
> >> > The box shouldn't be too large though.
>
> >> > The small wood houses are permanent solutions...plus they're
> >> > re-saleable...although don't look for appreciation values. ;)
>
> >> >> Another neat thing would be (forgive me, I can only explain it) that
> >> >> rubbery material that has a slightly furry effect...
>
> >> >> ...you can staple it to either side of an entryway with a slit down
> >> >> the middle. It basically seals itself after a cat squeezes through.
> >> >> Kind of like those old plastic coin purses.
>
> >> > As long as it works to cover the entrance, and keep a bit of heat in.
>
> >> Nothing wrong with boarding up the entrance and installing a standard
> >> "cat
> >> door" in it. They have a magnetically closed plastic curtain that is
> >> effective in keeping the cold out.- Hide quoted text -
>
> >> - Show quoted text -
>
> > good point well presented.
>
> > the one i was thinking of was shown onthat website and is called the
> > Kat Kabin or something, it is made of plastic so therefore it will not
> > rot or pickup moisture or get socked like a cardboard box or whatever
> > else someone suggested earlier, AND it is raised off the ground so
> > keeping it a bit warming by keepignit off the cold ground, AND
> > stopping it getting flooded inside. you could also put some dry
> > bedding in there on a daily basis for extra snuggliness, not sure how
> > you would close off the entrance to keep heat in, maybe drape some
> > sheets of clear plastic over the front? obviously with a split down
> > the middle to allow access.
>
> > just don'tdo anything daft like give him/her a cardboard box to hide
> > in outside as that will just get soaked and do more harm than good
>
> > bookie
>
> But cardboard does work pretty well in an enclosed space, like a garage. I
> had a feral cat live in one once in my garage for several months. I
> eventually moved her into the house, and we lived together for several
> years.....Another thing I did with my present feral cat was put a waterproof
> heating pad in a fiberglass cat carrier and plug it in to an outside AC
> source on my back porch....But if you do this make sure the heat is set to
> "low", and the AC source is ground-fault protected. - He too, became an
> inside cat, and today, he hardly ever goes outside anymore......- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

yes it is an excellent heat insulator, but if it is outside and gets
wet it is going to be useless obviously.

in your garage in the dry obviously it worked well.

you can also get heat pads now which you warm in the microwave which
give off a constant heat, without fear of electrocuting your cat

RPSinha
December 14th 07, 08:07 AM
bookie > wrote:

: 1) maybe only let her outside for a pee just before she is due to be
: fed, or her dinner time, that way she willhave to return as she will
: be hungry

This is an interesting proactive strategy I hadn't thought of and maybe
should try. Her usual behavior to wake up, go to the kitchen and either
sit by her eating area or clawi the cupboard (="feed me"), eat, then
sit by the back door (="open it"), and leave. Obviously she feels no
need to have a schedule to come back. :)

Next time when she wants to eat, I'll try opening the door instead. She
is an extremely smart cat and I can just imagine what she will do:
Ignore the door and keep waiting for food. As soon as she has eaten,
she'll head for the door waiting for me to open it.

honeybunch
December 15th 07, 02:30 AM
On Dec 13, 2:08 am, IBen Getiner > wrote:
> On Dec 12, 3:53´┐Żam, RPSinha > wrote:
>
>
>
> > I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> > of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> > days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> > sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> > demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> > bit reserved.
>
> > As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> > life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> > inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> > help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> > 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> > more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> > moody.
>
> > 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> > soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> > again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> > and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> > because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> > 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> > not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> > She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> > least a few crumbs of something.
>
> > 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> > and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> > even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> > startled. How to discourage that?
>
> > 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> > spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> > started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> > only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> > onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> > When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> > pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> > was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> > the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> > her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> > 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> > go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> > to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> > Question: ´┐ŻUp to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> > outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> > doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> > precipitation.
>
> > Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> > all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> > get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> > has any really warm spots.)
>
> > 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> > welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> > beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> > dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> > things essential or gimmicks?
>
> > 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> > those harmful to her?
>
> > Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!
>
> You obviously like to take things very seriously. I see that you tend
> to compensate for your insecurities by talking a lot. Do you realize
> this....? Because none of your concerns are well-founded. Not in my
> opinion.
>
> IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner is a grouch.

bookie
December 15th 07, 03:08 AM
On Dec 14, 7:07 am, RPSinha > wrote:
> bookie > wrote:
>
> : 1) maybe only let her outside for a pee just before she is due to be
> : fed, or her dinner time, that way she willhave to return as she will
> : be hungry
>
> This is an interesting proactive strategy I hadn't thought of and maybe
> should try. Her usual behavior to wake up, go to the kitchen and either
> sit by her eating area or clawi the cupboard (="feed me"), eat, then
> sit by the back door (="open it"), and leave. Obviously she feels no
> need to have a schedule to come back. :)
>
> Next time when she wants to eat, I'll try opening the door instead. She
> is an extremely smart cat and I can just imagine what she will do:
> Ignore the door and keep waiting for food. As soon as she has eaten,
> she'll head for the door waiting for me to open it.

well it was just an idea, you don't have to try it if you don't want
to , no need to dis it straight off though

LevithanDiamond
December 15th 07, 03:14 AM
On Dec 14, 8:30┬*pm, honeybunch > wrote:
> On Dec 13, 2:08 am, IBen Getiner > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Dec 12, 3:53´┐Żam, RPSinha > wrote:
>
> > > I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> > > of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> > > days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> > > sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> > > demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> > > bit reserved.
>
> > > As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> > > life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> > > inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> > > help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> > > 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> > > more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> > > moody.
>
> > > 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> > > soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> > > again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> > > and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> > > because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> > > 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> > > not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> > > She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> > > least a few crumbs of something.
>
> > > 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> > > and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> > > even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> > > startled. How to discourage that?
>
> > > 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> > > spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> > > started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> > > only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> > > onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> > > When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> > > pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> > > was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> > > the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> > > her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> > > 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> > > go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> > > to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> > > Question: ´┐ŻUp to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> > > outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> > > doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> > > precipitation.
>
> > > Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> > > all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> > > get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> > > has any really warm spots.)
>
> > > 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> > > welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> > > beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> > > dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> > > things essential or gimmicks?
>
> > > 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> > > those harmful to her?
>
> > > Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!
>
> > You obviously like to take things very seriously. ┬*I see that you tend
> > to compensate for your insecurities by talking a lot. Do you realize
> > this....? Because none of your concerns are well-founded. Not in my
> > opinion.
>
> > IBen Getiner
>
> IBen Getiner is a grouch.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

That's Usenet for you.

1. The internets are serious business
2. We're basically 4chan in text form
3. See rule 1.

RPSinha
December 15th 07, 07:25 AM
bookie > wrote:

: well it was just an idea, you don't have to try it if you don't want
: to , no need to dis it straight off though

My apology if it came across that way. Didn't mean to diss you or
anything, I was just talking to myself about what I may face. Yours was
one of the most helpful replies and greatly appreciated.

IBen Getiner
December 16th 07, 12:22 AM
On Dec 14, 8:30┬*pm, honeybunch > wrote:
> On Dec 13, 2:08 > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Dec 12, 3:53´┐Żam, RPSinha > wrote:
>
> > > I am taking care of a cat, approx 1 yr old, for neighbors who are out
> > > of the country for several months. During warmer days, she spent her
> > > days in the connected yards including perhaps her own, came to us at
> > > sunset, had dinner, went to sleep on our couch, woke up around 5AM,
> > > demanded breakfast, and then went out. Her behavior was perfect if a
> > > bit reserved.
>
> > > As Midwestern winter has set in, perhaps the first one of her conscious
> > > life, her behavior and personality have changed. That plus our
> > > inexperience is giving rise to some anxiety and *many* questions. All
> > > help on what we should do, or leave alone, would be appreciated.
>
> > > 0. With snow storms and icy rains outside, she is now spending much
> > > more time at our home indoors. This is also driving her stir-crazy and
> > > moody.
>
> > > 1. Sometimes she wants to get out at odd hours. Of course, she's back
> > > soon, or not so soon and we are worried. Then she wants to go out
> > > again. (This is at least partly because she hates using the litter box
> > > and wouldn't unless the weather was truly miserable outside, but also
> > > because she has had outdoors all her life and feels cooped in)
>
> > > 2. She wants to eat something every few hours. I think she is bored,
> > > not hungry. We resist, try to entertain her, but success is limited.
> > > She is always sitting in the kitchen or follows us there and expects at
> > > least a few crumbs of something.
>
> > > 3. She has started a new game indoors which is to hide behind something
> > > and mock-attack our legs as we pass by. It is truly harmless and we
> > > even enjoy it, but she tries the same with visitors and they get
> > > startled. How to discourage that?
>
> > > 5. Tonight she wanted to go out and down. Something about icy stairs
> > > spooked her and she came back and (for the first time) climbed &
> > > started walking on the railing of our 3rd floor porch. The railing is
> > > only 3" wide and was icy in patches. If she had fallen, it would be
> > > onto a wooden deck about 2.5 floors below.
>
> > > When I saw this my heart almost stopped. She wouldn't listen to my
> > > pleadings to come back and I didn't want to startle her. Fortunately I
> > > was only a few feet away from the dry food bag and the sound of shaking
> > > the bag brought her down and in! (Question: Was I right to worry about
> > > her on a 3" railing, or is that safe enough for cats?)
>
> > > 6. She has been an indoor-outdoor almost all her life here and wants to
> > > go out. If she has been out for long, we may get busy and she may have
> > > to wait 20-30 minutes before someone notices her and lets her in.
>
> > > Question: ´┐ŻUp to what kind of wind-chill can she safely wait 30 minutes
> > > outside? (I have put a heat-reflecting pad on the chair and there is a
> > > doormat.) If she did stay there, she may be exposed to the wind but not
> > > precipitation.
>
> > > Question: Up to what kind of temperatures can she safely stay outdoor
> > > all day? (I am sure she can find places that are dry--though she could
> > > get rain/snow getting to those--and avoid winds, but not sure if she
> > > has any really warm spots.)
>
> > > 7. Inside our home the night temperatures is set at 60 deg. She is
> > > welcome to sleep anywhere and she has her favorite comforter, cushions,
> > > beds, etc. But we don't have any cat-beds, neither heated ones nor
> > > dome/pyramid types that would trap her body heat. Should we? Are those
> > > things essential or gimmicks?
>
> > > 8. Everyone is spreading rock salt and the more expensive kind. Are
> > > those harmful to her?
>
> > > Lots of questions, and as I said all help appreciated!
>
> > You obviously like to take things very seriously. ┬*I see that you tend
> > to compensate for your insecurities by talking a lot. Do you realize
> > this....? Because none of your concerns are well-founded. Not in my
> > opinion.
>
> >IBenGetiner
>
> IBenGetineris a grouch.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Why, that's the nicest thing anybody`s said about me in years....



IBen Getiner