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View Full Version : Would a former stud boy cat make a suitable pet?


catto
December 31st 07, 02:06 PM
I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
temperment.

I've been offered a cat and would like some advice please before I
commit to see/adopt him. This is his how he is described:

"3 year old male neuter. Friendly. Was a working boy and is clean. He
is not happy to share his home with other cats but does get on with
dogs. Needs a quiet home, no children."

He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
homed.

My questions are:

Why might the need to re-homed have arisen?

As he was a stud boy, will there be any difference from the male
neuters I have previously adopted, which I assume were neutered before
maturity?

Is he likely to be spraying despite neutering or does the "clean"
comment mean he does not spray?

Will he be affectionate and friendly to people if he's been living in
a stud pen?

What other questions should I ask the rescue?

catto
January 1st 08, 11:43 AM
I'd really appreciate a reply from anyone with experience of cats,
including breeders and vets perhaps.

CourtneyCat via CatKB.com
January 1st 08, 05:44 PM
You should ask

Were there any problems with the breeding?

Has the cat EVER had health problems? If so what were they?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------
This is a question for you.
What state do you live in?
Maybe i can find another cat resue so you can compare.


catto wrote:
>I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
>adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
>temperment.
>
>I've been offered a cat and would like some advice please before I
>commit to see/adopt him. This is his how he is described:
>
>"3 year old male neuter. Friendly. Was a working boy and is clean. He
>is not happy to share his home with other cats but does get on with
>dogs. Needs a quiet home, no children."
>
>He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
>homed.
>
>My questions are:
>
>Why might the need to re-homed have arisen?
>
>As he was a stud boy, will there be any difference from the male
>neuters I have previously adopted, which I assume were neutered before
>maturity?
>
>Is he likely to be spraying despite neutering or does the "clean"
>comment mean he does not spray?
>
>Will he be affectionate and friendly to people if he's been living in
>a stud pen?
>
>What other questions should I ask the rescue?

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Sheelagh>\o\
January 2nd 08, 05:35 PM
On Dec 31 2007, 2:06*pm, catto > wrote:
> I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
> adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
> temperment.
>
> I've been offered a cat and would like some advice please before I
> commit to see/adopt him. This is his how he is described:
>
> "3 year old male neuter. Friendly. Was a working boy and is clean. He
> is not happy to share his home with other cats but does get on with
> dogs. Needs a quiet home, no children."
>
> He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
> homed.
>
> My questions are:
>
> Why might the need to re-homed have arisen?
>
> As he was a stud boy, will there be any difference from the male
> neuters I have previously adopted, which I assume were neutered before
> maturity?
>
> Is he likely to be spraying despite neutering or does the "clean"
> comment mean he does not spray?
>
> Will he be affectionate and friendly to people if he's been living in
> a stud pen?
>
> What other questions should I ask the rescue?




On Dec 31 2007, 2:06 pm, catto > wrote:
> I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
> adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
> temperament.
>
> I've been offered a cat and would like some advice please before I
> commit to see/adopt him. This is his how he is described:
>
> "3 year old male neuter. Friendly. Was a working boy and is clean. He
> is not happy to share his home with other cats but does get on with
> dogs. Needs a quiet home, no children."
>
> He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
> homed.

Gosh, where do I start?

Assuming that you have no small children, & no other cats...?

> He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
> homed
> Why might the need to re-homed have arisen?

Mostly, Breeders retire stud cats at around 6-7 years old. The reasons
for rehoming a stud cat can be numerous. The main reason is because
they have sired many litters, & the breeder wishes to deviate from
their old bloodlines & introduce new bloodlines. By that age, he is
ready to spend his twighlight years with a family who have time & love
to offer him.

However, that is not the only reason. It could be because of ill
health ( Which *he should be in excellent condition Health*). A stud
cat is an investment, so any good breeder would make sure that they
look after their investment- 99.9% of breeders would, but do you know
if you are dealing with a kitten miller? ( kitten farm for the UK), or
a good breeder who is simply looking for the best home that she can
find so that the cat might retire with a nice home & family who will
care for him.

Most breeders only allow certified health checked Queens to mingle
with their prize stud cat. OTOH, if you have hooked up with a Kitten
miller, they will only look for some mug who will care for the cat,
regardless of his health. It mostly boils down to what breeder she/ he
is. You might also expect him to come free to a good home. If you are
charged, then it should only be for the neutering fee's.


> As he was a stud boy, will there be any difference from the male
> neuters I have previously adopted, which I assume were neutered before
> maturity?

Late neuters do tend to spray.
Having said that, it doesn't mean to say that he will spray your house
from top, to bottom. If you think about it, most cats that are trapped
neutered & put up for adoption, are also later neuters- & they don't
necessarily spray!! I have 2 ex breeding stud cats here. For the first
6 months I nearly pulled my hair out.

Now that they have had time to settle, they don't spray @ all. The
only problems that I did have, were soon sorted out with the use of
stud pants if you have ever heard of them?
If not, let me know & I will put you on to some, OK?

> Is he likely to be spraying despite neutering or does the "clean"
> comment mean he does not spray?

With a *Clean environment*, you shouldn't get much, if any spraying @
all. Mostly, when a male cat marks his territory, it is usually to
remark a spot where he can smell prior visitors. Other than that, he
shouldn't spray. As you state, the rescue center/ Breeder are telling
you that he is not a sprayer..........

> Will he be affectionate and friendly to people if he's been living in
> a stud pen?

Oh Yes!! Very affectionate indeed!!

When you think about it, he has probablly speant the last 6-7 years
caged in a pen that he couldn't get out of. The only affection he ever
got was when his breeder had the time to spend with them. in my
experience, they are starved of love & do appreciate the love you have
to offer.



> What other questions should I ask the rescue?

How old is he.
How long have you had him
Are there any health problems
Has he had any health problems in the past
Why are you retiring him
Is he an affectionate cat
Will he be neutered when you collect him
Might you be able to visit both the cat & the breeder that owns him
Who was he bred by ( so that you can do your own personal checks)
Can you have his anual booster card for his shots,
What vet does She/ He use (check them out too, & pay a courtesy call.)

> I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
> adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
> temperment.

You shouldn't have any problems finding what you are looing for. I
would like to point out here, that you are only the second person that
I have ever noticed in the last year or so, who is prepared to
consider rescuing a pedigree cat; even pedigree cats need rescuing now
& then. Being a pedigree cat is no reassurance when it comes to being
abused & uncared for. Thank you for considering the idea. Not many
people do.

Personally, I would have a long chat, visit the cat, then take it from
there. If this cat is meant to be, you will have him. He is no
different to any other cat, other than the fact that he had no control
over his enviroment. He was caged, & had no way of getting out. In
fact, his only company over the years, has been a breeder who has very
little time to spend with him, & the queens that he has serviced over
the years.

I hope that all goes well for you, & also the cat involved too.
Good Luck,
Sheelagh >"o"<

honeybunch
January 3rd 08, 02:05 AM
On Jan 2, 12:35 pm, "Sheelagh>\"o\"<" > wrote:
> On Dec 31 2007, 2:06 pm, catto > wrote:
>
>
>
> > I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
> > adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
> > temperment.
>
> > I've been offered a cat and would like some advice please before I
> > commit to see/adopt him. This is his how he is described:
>
> > "3 year old male neuter. Friendly. Was a working boy and is clean. He
> > is not happy to share his home with other cats but does get on with
> > dogs. Needs a quiet home, no children."
>
> > He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
> > homed.
>
> > My questions are:
>
> > Why might the need to re-homed have arisen?
>
> > As he was a stud boy, will there be any difference from the male
> > neuters I have previously adopted, which I assume were neutered before
> > maturity?
>
> > Is he likely to be spraying despite neutering or does the "clean"
> > comment mean he does not spray?
>
> > Will he be affectionate and friendly to people if he's been living in
> > a stud pen?
>
> > What other questions should I ask the rescue?
>
> On Dec 31 2007, 2:06 pm, catto > wrote:
>
> > I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
> > adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
> > temperament.
>
> > I've been offered a cat and would like some advice please before I
> > commit to see/adopt him. This is his how he is described:
>
> > "3 year old male neuter. Friendly. Was a working boy and is clean. He
> > is not happy to share his home with other cats but does get on with
> > dogs. Needs a quiet home, no children."
>
> > He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
> > homed.
>
> Gosh, where do I start?
>
> Assuming that you have no small children, & no other cats...?
>
> > He has come from a breeder who is said to be sad that he must be re-
> > homed
> > Why might the need to re-homed have arisen?
>
> Mostly, Breeders retire stud cats at around 6-7 years old. The reasons
> for rehoming a stud cat can be numerous. The main reason is because
> they have sired many litters, & the breeder wishes to deviate from
> their old bloodlines & introduce new bloodlines. By that age, he is
> ready to spend his twighlight years with a family who have time & love
> to offer him.
>
> However, that is not the only reason. It could be because of ill
> health ( Which *he should be in excellent condition Health*). A stud
> cat is an investment, so any good breeder would make sure that they
> look after their investment- 99.9% of breeders would, but do you know
> if you are dealing with a kitten miller? ( kitten farm for the UK), or
> a good breeder who is simply looking for the best home that she can
> find so that the cat might retire with a nice home & family who will
> care for him.
>
> Most breeders only allow certified health checked Queens to mingle
> with their prize stud cat. OTOH, if you have hooked up with a Kitten
> miller, they will only look for some mug who will care for the cat,
> regardless of his health. It mostly boils down to what breeder she/ he
> is. You might also expect him to come free to a good home. If you are
> charged, then it should only be for the neutering fee's.
>
> > As he was a stud boy, will there be any difference from the male
> > neuters I have previously adopted, which I assume were neutered before
> > maturity?
>
> Late neuters do tend to spray.
> Having said that, it doesn't mean to say that he will spray your house
> from top, to bottom. If you think about it, most cats that are trapped
> neutered & put up for adoption, are also later neuters- & they don't
> necessarily spray!! I have 2 ex breeding stud cats here. For the first
> 6 months I nearly pulled my hair out.
>
> Now that they have had time to settle, they don't spray @ all. The
> only problems that I did have, were soon sorted out with the use of
> stud pants if you have ever heard of them?
> If not, let me know & I will put you on to some, OK?
>
> > Is he likely to be spraying despite neutering or does the "clean"
> > comment mean he does not spray?
>
> With a *Clean environment*, you shouldn't get much, if any spraying @
> all. Mostly, when a male cat marks his territory, it is usually to
> remark a spot where he can smell prior visitors. Other than that, he
> shouldn't spray. As you state, the rescue center/ Breeder are telling
> you that he is not a sprayer..........
>
> > Will he be affectionate and friendly to people if he's been living in
> > a stud pen?
>
> Oh Yes!! Very affectionate indeed!!
>
> When you think about it, he has probablly speant the last 6-7 years
> caged in a pen that he couldn't get out of. The only affection he ever
> got was when his breeder had the time to spend with them. in my
> experience, they are starved of love & do appreciate the love you have
> to offer.
>
> > What other questions should I ask the rescue?
>
> How old is he.
> How long have you had him
> Are there any health problems
> Has he had any health problems in the past
> Why are you retiring him
> Is he an affectionate cat
> Will he be neutered when you collect him
> Might you be able to visit both the cat & the breeder that owns him
> Who was he bred by ( so that you can do your own personal checks)
> Can you have his anual booster card for his shots,
> What vet does She/ He use (check them out too, & pay a courtesy call.)
>
> > I've been to rescue centres to find a pet cat. I want an long-haired
> > adult male neuter, in good health and with a friendly outgoing
> > temperment.
>
> You shouldn't have any problems finding what you are looing for. I
> would like to point out here, that you are only the second person that
> I have ever noticed in the last year or so, who is prepared to
> consider rescuing a pedigree cat; even pedigree cats need rescuing now
> & then. Being a pedigree cat is no reassurance when it comes to being
> abused & uncared for. Thank you for considering the idea. Not many
> people do.
>
> Personally, I would have a long chat, visit the cat, then take it from
> there. If this cat is meant to be, you will have him. He is no
> different to any other cat, other than the fact that he had no control
> over his enviroment. He was caged, & had no way of getting out. In
> fact, his only company over the years, has been a breeder who has very
> little time to spend with him, & the queens that he has serviced over
> the years.
>
> I hope that all goes well for you, & also the cat involved too.
> Good Luck,
> Sheelagh >"o"<

This sounds sooo sad.