PDA

View Full Version : What do cats do at night outside?


honeybunch
January 25th 08, 01:55 PM
I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. What goes on
out there? I live in an old surburban neighborhood in Philadelphia.
There is a high wall at the bottom of my garden separating it from a
school for the blind. The wall is about 10 feet high but he gets up
there and walks around on it and I am afraid he might jump down on the
other side and not be able to jump back up. That's one fear. At
night he can be comatose with sleep in his basket in my bedroom. I
turn out the light and while Im falling asleep , he silently wakes up
and jumps up on the window sill because something outside had gotten
his attention. I take a look and cant see a thing. I wonder if its
safer to let him out all night or just for a couple of hours in the
morning. He does his business outside and cries to go out when he
means business. I know that during the day he stalks birds and once
he chased a rabbit and it got stuck in a fence and made so much noise
that he ran off and I had to go and rescue the screaming rabbit. But
what goes on at night that facinates cats so?

cybercat
January 25th 08, 04:04 PM
"honeybunch" > wrote in message
...
>I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather.

I don't know, why don't you wait until he freezes to death, gets hit by a
car or killed
by another animal, then you'll know for sure.

You're the one with the large brain and opposable thumbs.

Figure it out.

bobblespin[_2_]
January 25th 08, 04:20 PM
honeybunch > wrote in news:15cf61a6-2600-4689-8bd3-
:

> I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. What goes on
> out there? I live in an old surburban neighborhood in Philadelphia.
> There is a high wall at the bottom of my garden separating it from a
> school for the blind. The wall is about 10 feet high but he gets up
> there and walks around on it and I am afraid he might jump down on the
> other side and not be able to jump back up. That's one fear. At
> night he can be comatose with sleep in his basket in my bedroom. I
> turn out the light and while Im falling asleep , he silently wakes up
> and jumps up on the window sill because something outside had gotten
> his attention. I take a look and cant see a thing. I wonder if its
> safer to let him out all night or just for a couple of hours in the
> morning. He does his business outside and cries to go out when he
> means business. I know that during the day he stalks birds and once
> he chased a rabbit and it got stuck in a fence and made so much noise
> that he ran off and I had to go and rescue the screaming rabbit. But
> what goes on at night that facinates cats so?

Well, one thing they do is come to my patio door and howl at my cat (who's
inside all night) at 3 in the morning and wake everybody up. There are two
cats in our neighbourhood who do that every night, and we're fed up with
it.

Bobble

cybercat
January 25th 08, 04:25 PM
"bobblespin" > wrote
> Well, one thing they do is come to my patio door and howl at my cat (who's
> inside all night) at 3 in the morning and wake everybody up. There are
> two
> cats in our neighbourhood who do that every night, and we're fed up with
> it.
>

And if you were a cat-hating cretin, you might just hurt that cat if you
could
catch it.

Another good reason to keep cats, particularly old, arthritic ones that
cannot
run fast, inside where they are safe.

Noon Cat Nick
January 25th 08, 06:24 PM
honeybunch wrote:
> I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. What goes on
> out there? I live in an old surburban neighborhood in Philadelphia.
> There is a high wall at the bottom of my garden separating it from a
> school for the blind. The wall is about 10 feet high but he gets up
> there and walks around on it and I am afraid he might jump down on the
> other side and not be able to jump back up. That's one fear. At
> night he can be comatose with sleep in his basket in my bedroom. I
> turn out the light and while Im falling asleep , he silently wakes up
> and jumps up on the window sill because something outside had gotten
> his attention. I take a look and cant see a thing. I wonder if its
> safer to let him out all night or just for a couple of hours in the
> morning. He does his business outside and cries to go out when he
> means business. I know that during the day he stalks birds and once
> he chased a rabbit and it got stuck in a fence and made so much noise
> that he ran off and I had to go and rescue the screaming rabbit. But
> what goes on at night that facinates cats so?

Without getting into the indoor-outdoor debate on what's best for pet
felines...

Outside at night, cats prowl and hunt. Indoor/outdoor pet cats usually
have an outdoor territory of about one square mile. They spend much of
their time patrolling it, guarding it from invaders. Along the way, if
they spot a tasty critter, they'll go on the hunt. And if, like yours,
they're used to using the wilderness as a toilet, that's another reason
to go out at night.

Cats by nature are nocturnal; they're built for nighttime romps. They
don't have stupendous eyesight, but they compensate with extraordinary
senses of smell and hearing. They also have the ability to dilate their
pupils to allow them to see in dim conditions. Plus they have a
phenomenal sense of direction, allowing them to find their way back to
home base in a variety of conditions. And arthritic though your pet may
be, cats naturally hide their afflictions from other animals, so as not
to clue either prey or predators in to their weaknesses. Along with
this, if your cat goes outdoors daily, he's probably built up a good
seasonal coat of fur and some extra body fat to protect him from frigid
temperatures. (You also might have noticed him eating more in recent
months; going outdoors in the winter requires extra calories to stay warm.)

IBen Getiner[_2_]
January 26th 08, 09:14 PM
On Jan 25, 8:55*am, honeybunch > wrote:
> I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. *What goes on
> out there? *

They Feed, Flee, **** and fight. What else...? What planet do you live
on anyway...?



IBen Getiner

Noon Cat Nick
January 26th 08, 10:44 PM
IBen Getiner wrote:

> On Jan 25, 8:55 am, honeybunch > wrote:
>
>>I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
>>loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. What goes on
>>out there?
>
>
> They Feed, Flee, **** and fight. What else...? What planet do you live
> on anyway...?
>
>
>
>

The planet of desexed cats, where they feed, flee and fight, but don't ****.

stonej
January 28th 08, 12:30 AM
On Jan 26, 5:44*pm, Noon Cat Nick >
wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > On Jan 25, 8:55 am, honeybunch > wrote:
>
> >>I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> >>loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. *What goes on
> >>out there? *
>
> > They Feed, Flee, **** and fight. What else...? What planet do you live
> > on anyway...?
>
> The planet of desexed cats, where they feed, flee and fight, but don't ****.


When I was living at home our cat went out at night quite often,
usually around 9:30 PM or so and my dad would say
to it "you know if you go out now you are out all night" (not that
the cat could understand him of course but this was
a favorite saying of his). Around 6 AM he would be scratching at the
door to get in and that was no problem as my
parents were early risers to get ready for work. Sometimes the cat
would climb up the apple tree and get on the
roof and come to my window and start scrathing to come in (usually
around 4 AM or so) when it did this it also
wanted to be fed right away and would make noise if it did not get
food pronto.

Sheelagh>\o\
January 28th 08, 06:47 PM
On Jan 26, 10:44*pm, Noon Cat Nick >
wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > On Jan 25, 8:55 am, honeybunch > wrote:
>
> >>I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> >>loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. *What goes on
> >>out there? *
>
> > They Feed, Flee, **** and fight. What else...? What planet do you live
> > on anyway...?
>
> The planet of desexed cats, where they feed, flee and fight, but don't ****.

LOL, V.Well worded
Sheelagh>"o"<

IBen Getiner[_2_]
January 29th 08, 09:40 AM
On Jan 27, 7:30�pm, stonej > wrote:
> On Jan 26, 5:44�pm, Noon Cat Nick >
> wrote:
>
> > IBen Getiner wrote:
> > > On Jan 25, 8:55 am, honeybunch > wrote:
>
> > >>I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> > >>loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. �What goes on
> > >>out there? �
>
> > > They Feed, Flee, **** and fight. What else...? What planet do you live
> > > on anyway...?
>
> > The planet of desexed cats, where they feed, flee and fight, but don't ****.
>
> When I was living at home our cat went out at night quite often,
> usually around 9:30 PM or so and my dad would say
> to it "you know if you go out now you are out all night" �(not that
> the cat could understand him of course but this was
> a favorite saying of his). � Around 6 AM he would be scratching at the
> door to get in and that was no problem as my
> parents were early risers to get ready for work. � Sometimes the cat
> would climb up the apple tree and get on the
> roof and come to my window and start scrathing to come in (usually
> around 4 AM or so) when it did this it also
> wanted to be fed right away and would make noise if it did not get
> food pronto.

A truthful soul. God bless 'em......



IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner[_2_]
January 29th 08, 09:46 AM
On Jan 28, 1:47�pm, "Sheelagh>\"o\"<" > wrote:
> On Jan 26, 10:44�pm, Noon Cat Nick >
> wrote:
>
> > IBen Getiner wrote:
> > > On Jan 25, 8:55 am, honeybunch > wrote:
>
> > >>I wonder why a neutered cat with a bit of arthritis in his rear leg
> > >>loves to stay out all night long in freezing weather. �What goes on
> > >>out there? �
>
> > > They Feed, Flee, **** and fight. What else...? What planet do you live
> > > on anyway...?
>
> > The planet of desexed cats, where they feed, flee and fight, but don't ****.
>
> LOL, �V.Well worded
> Sheelagh>"o"<

Yes, Indeed. Let us pray in the hope of ****ing a male animal. If it
were granted, we would be forced to respond......

IBen Getiner

RPS
February 6th 08, 07:58 AM
Noon Cat Nick > wrote:

: if your cat goes outdoors daily, he's probably built up a good
: seasonal coat of fur and some extra body fat to protect him from frigid
: temperatures.

How long can they stay in different temperatures: 30, 20, 10, 0? Real
temperatures or wind chill?

My cat wants to get out like OP's. I haven't gotten around to
installing a cat door, but I just leave the back door propped open a
crack, She usually pushes her way back in about 1/2 - 1 hour. She is
good enough to let me know she's back, so then I lock the door.

Another weird thing my cat does: Sometimes she would run ou t even if
it was 10 degrees. Other times she would recoil back from 40 degree
temperatures (she would insist I open the door, she would take a step
or two out, and then run back).

Noon Cat Nick
February 6th 08, 09:47 AM
RPS wrote:
> Noon Cat Nick > wrote:
>
> : if your cat goes outdoors daily, he's probably built up a good
> : seasonal coat of fur and some extra body fat to protect him from frigid
> : temperatures.
>
> How long can they stay in different temperatures: 30, 20, 10, 0? Real
> temperatures or wind chill?

Wind chill affects all animals, cats included. Cats are more prone to
avoid the wet, so snow or rain would be more likely to keep them in.

The coat and added girth, however, aren't enough to compensate entirely
for winter conditions at their bitterest. If your cat knows its outdoor
territory well enough, though, he's accrued plenty of places to go to
stay dry, fairly warm, and out of the wind.

My late cat Bijou insisted on going outdoors to relieve himself,
regardless of conditions. He refused to utilize the litter box. Even at
-10F with a foot of snow on the ground and a rip-roaring wind, he'd
still make a mad dash outside to do his bidness, and come racing back to
the door about a minute later.

>
> My cat wants to get out like OP's. I haven't gotten around to
> installing a cat door, but I just leave the back door propped open a
> crack, She usually pushes her way back in about 1/2 - 1 hour. She is
> good enough to let me know she's back, so then I lock the door.
>
> Another weird thing my cat does: Sometimes she would run ou t even if
> it was 10 degrees. Other times she would recoil back from 40 degree
> temperatures (she would insist I open the door, she would take a step
> or two out, and then run back).

Hard to say why. If she'd not been out for sometime, maybe she just
hadda have a taste of Mother Nature, even if it meant spending time in
an arctic wonderland. As for the other, all I can think is she'd been
spoiled by a run of dandy weather, and 40F was beneath her standards at
the time.

cybercat
February 6th 08, 05:53 PM
"RPS" > wrote in message
...
> Noon Cat Nick > wrote:
>
> : if your cat goes outdoors daily, he's probably built up a good
> : seasonal coat of fur and some extra body fat to protect him from frigid
> : temperatures.
>
> How long can they stay in different temperatures: 30, 20, 10, 0? Real
> temperatures or wind chill?
>
> My cat wants to get out like OP's. I haven't gotten around to
> installing a cat door, but I just leave the back door propped open a
> crack, She usually pushes her way back in about 1/2 - 1 hour. She is
> good enough to let me know she's back, so then I lock the door.
>
> Another weird thing my cat does: Sometimes she would run ou t even if
> it was 10 degrees. Other times she would recoil back from 40 degree
> temperatures (she would insist I open the door, she would take a step
> or two out, and then run back).

She has a little tiny cat brain. You on the other hand, should know better.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

honeybunch
February 6th 08, 07:14 PM
On Feb 6, 12:53 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "RPS" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > Noon Cat Nick > wrote:
>
> > : if your cat goes outdoors daily, he's probably built up a good
> > : seasonal coat of fur and some extra body fat to protect him from frigid
> > : temperatures.
>
> > How long can they stay in different temperatures: 30, 20, 10, 0? Real
> > temperatures or wind chill?
>
> > My cat wants to get out like OP's. I haven't gotten around to
> > installing a cat door, but I just leave the back door propped open a
> > crack, She usually pushes her way back in about 1/2 - 1 hour. She is
> > good enough to let me know she's back, so then I lock the door.
>
> > Another weird thing my cat does: Sometimes she would run ou t even if
> > it was 10 degrees. Other times she would recoil back from 40 degree
> > temperatures (she would insist I open the door, she would take a step
> > or two out, and then run back).
>
> She has a little tiny cat brain. You on the other hand, should know better.
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.teranews.com

I think the size of the cat brain is sufficient for the size of their
body. Its just too bad they can't talk. But probably they'd sound
like lunatics if they did and scare us to death.