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View Full Version : Boo's Hyperactive Thyroid--Update


cybercat
February 20th 08, 02:09 PM
Those of you who have read the group for a while may remember that I have a
tuxedo girl named Boo who we adopted from a relative when she was five years
old and obese--18 lbs when she is a petite girl who the vet says should
weigh 8 lbs.

She presented with an overactive thyroid a few years back--one of the rare
cats who can have this condition and stay obese, most lose weight--and also
fainting spells, or episodes of arhythmia, in which she kind of listed to
one side and was unresponsive. We had an ultrasound done and it showed that
her heart was sound. The vet thought she had simply developed arythmia from
the very fast heartbeat an overactive thyroid produces. So she went on the
generic form of Tapazole (thyroid medicine) and a beta blocker to keep her
heart rate stable, and she has been fine. I take her in periodically for
blood tests, probably three times a year.

Well the last time, her thyroid levels were very high. Up to a 9 or 10, I
forget which part of the hormones they tested, T3 or T4? The vet was very
concerned and said we could try to give her 3/4 of a 10 mg. Methiamazole
tablet twice a day, instead of 1/2 of a tablet twice a day, "but that's a
LOT of methiamazole." (Generic Tapazole.)

Point: we got a good report yesteday. She is within normal range, a 5, so in
the high part of normal, but the vet says that is fine.

On the "fat front": using a canned-food only, controlled feeding diet (every
12 hours, amount reduced by 1/4 every time she plateaued) we got Boo down to
9 lbs. It was amazing and wonderful. Her coat, once dull and flaky, became
shiny and healthy, she played more, could actually run up the steps instead
of trudging. But it was very hard, as she LOVES food (the old guy who had
her first expressed love this way: "Want a goody?") and is very assertive.
(She slapped my feet as I walked by the kitchen, any time I walked by the
kitchen, if she thought it was feeding time and she ALWAYS thought it was
feeding time!)

Point: after the bad thyroid diagnosis, I began feeding her canned in the
morning and controlled portions of her favorite dry at night--just because
she LOVES the dry food. She put on a single pound, which the vet says is not
bad, and is so much happier.

Candace
February 22nd 08, 03:08 AM
On Feb 20, 6:09*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> Those of you who have read the group for a while may remember that I have a
> tuxedo girl named Boo who we adopted from a relative when she was five years
> old and obese--18 lbs when she is a petite girl who the vet says should
> weigh 8 lbs.
>
> She presented with an overactive thyroid a few years back--one of the rare
> cats who can have this condition and stay obese, most lose weight--and also
> fainting spells, or episodes of arhythmia, in which she kind of listed to
> one side and was unresponsive. We had an ultrasound done and it showed that
> her heart was sound. The vet thought she had simply developed arythmia from
> the very fast heartbeat an overactive thyroid produces. So she went on the
> generic form of Tapazole (thyroid medicine) and a beta blocker to keep her
> heart rate stable, and she has been fine. I take her in periodically for
> blood tests, probably three times a year.
>
> Well the last time, her thyroid levels were very high. Up to a 9 or 10, I
> forget which part of the hormones they tested, T3 or T4? The vet was very
> concerned and said we could try to give her 3/4 of a 10 mg. Methiamazole
> tablet twice a day, instead of 1/2 of a tablet twice a day, "but that's a
> LOT of methiamazole." (Generic Tapazole.)
>
> Point: we got a good report yesteday. She is within normal range, a 5, so in
> the high part of normal, but the vet says that is fine.
>
> On the "fat front": using a canned-food only, controlled feeding diet (every
> 12 hours, amount reduced by 1/4 every time she plateaued) we got Boo down to
> 9 lbs. It was amazing and wonderful. Her coat, once dull and flaky, became
> shiny and healthy, she played more, could actually run up the steps instead
> of trudging. But it was very hard, as she LOVES food (the old guy who had
> her first expressed love this way: "Want a goody?") and is very assertive.
> (She slapped my feet as I walked by the kitchen, any time I walked by the
> kitchen, if she thought it was feeding time and she ALWAYS thought it was
> feeding time!)
>
> Point: after the bad thyroid diagnosis, I began feeding her canned in the
> morning and controlled portions of her favorite dry at night--just because
> she LOVES the dry food. She put on a single pound, which the vet says is not
> bad, and is so much happier.

Wow, great news!

Candace

cybercat
February 22nd 08, 03:34 AM
"Candace" > wrote
>Wow, great news!

Thanks! Nice to see you.

I had a feeling of dread about Boo before I took her in, goes to
show you how intuitive I am~~NOT!

How is your gang?

Phil P.
February 22nd 08, 08:03 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> Those of you who have read the group for a while may remember that I have
a
> tuxedo girl named Boo who we adopted from a relative when she was five
years
> old and obese--18 lbs when she is a petite girl who the vet says should
> weigh 8 lbs.
>
> She presented with an overactive thyroid a few years back--one of the rare
> cats who can have this condition and stay obese, most lose weight--and
also
> fainting spells, or episodes of arhythmia, in which she kind of listed to
> one side and was unresponsive. We had an ultrasound done and it showed
that
> her heart was sound. The vet thought she had simply developed arythmia
from
> the very fast heartbeat an overactive thyroid produces. So she went on the
> generic form of Tapazole (thyroid medicine) and a beta blocker to keep her
> heart rate stable, and she has been fine. I take her in periodically for
> blood tests, probably three times a year.
>
> Well the last time, her thyroid levels were very high. Up to a 9 or 10, I
> forget which part of the hormones they tested, T3 or T4? The vet was very
> concerned and said we could try to give her 3/4 of a 10 mg. Methiamazole
> tablet twice a day, instead of 1/2 of a tablet twice a day, "but that's a
> LOT of methiamazole." (Generic Tapazole.)
>
> Point: we got a good report yesteday. She is within normal range, a 5, so
in
> the high part of normal, but the vet says that is fine.
>
> On the "fat front": using a canned-food only, controlled feeding diet
(every
> 12 hours, amount reduced by 1/4 every time she plateaued) we got Boo down
to
> 9 lbs. It was amazing and wonderful. Her coat, once dull and flaky, became
> shiny and healthy, she played more, could actually run up the steps
instead
> of trudging. But it was very hard, as she LOVES food (the old guy who had
> her first expressed love this way: "Want a goody?") and is very assertive.
> (She slapped my feet as I walked by the kitchen, any time I walked by the
> kitchen, if she thought it was feeding time and she ALWAYS thought it was
> feeding time!)
>
> Point: after the bad thyroid diagnosis, I began feeding her canned in the
> morning and controlled portions of her favorite dry at night--just because
> she LOVES the dry food. She put on a single pound, which the vet says is
not
> bad, and is so much happier.


If you have a copy of her latest blood test results, could you post her BUN
and creatinine values?

You did a fantastic job with her weight!!

Phil

CatNipped[_2_]
February 22nd 08, 03:21 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> Those of you who have read the group for a while may remember that I have
> a tuxedo girl named Boo who we adopted from a relative when she was five
> years old and obese--18 lbs when she is a petite girl who the vet says
> should weigh 8 lbs.
>
> She presented with an overactive thyroid a few years back--one of the rare
> cats who can have this condition and stay obese, most lose weight--and
> also fainting spells, or episodes of arhythmia, in which she kind of
> listed to one side and was unresponsive. We had an ultrasound done and it
> showed that her heart was sound. The vet thought she had simply developed
> arythmia from the very fast heartbeat an overactive thyroid produces. So
> she went on the generic form of Tapazole (thyroid medicine) and a beta
> blocker to keep her heart rate stable, and she has been fine. I take her
> in periodically for blood tests, probably three times a year.
>
> Well the last time, her thyroid levels were very high. Up to a 9 or 10, I
> forget which part of the hormones they tested, T3 or T4? The vet was very
> concerned and said we could try to give her 3/4 of a 10 mg. Methiamazole
> tablet twice a day, instead of 1/2 of a tablet twice a day, "but that's a
> LOT of methiamazole." (Generic Tapazole.)
>
> Point: we got a good report yesteday. She is within normal range, a 5, so
> in the high part of normal, but the vet says that is fine.
>
> On the "fat front": using a canned-food only, controlled feeding diet
> (every 12 hours, amount reduced by 1/4 every time she plateaued) we got
> Boo down to 9 lbs. It was amazing and wonderful. Her coat, once dull and
> flaky, became shiny and healthy, she played more, could actually run up
> the steps instead of trudging. But it was very hard, as she LOVES food
> (the old guy who had her first expressed love this way: "Want a goody?")
> and is very assertive. (She slapped my feet as I walked by the kitchen,
> any time I walked by the kitchen, if she thought it was feeding time and
> she ALWAYS thought it was feeding time!)
>
> Point: after the bad thyroid diagnosis, I began feeding her canned in the
> morning and controlled portions of her favorite dry at night--just because
> she LOVES the dry food. She put on a single pound, which the vet says is
> not bad, and is so much happier.

Boo's story is one of the reasons I reconsidered letting my clowder "snack"
on dry food in between feedings. You did a great job getting your pretty
girl slim and healthy, congratulations!

Hugs,

CatNipped

cybercat
February 22nd 08, 06:52 PM
"Phil P." > wrote
> If you have a copy of her latest blood test results, could you post her
> BUN
> and creatinine values?

They did not give me these. I will call and see if they can tell me.

>
> You did a fantastic job with her weight!!
>

Thanks, Phil! It was your recommendation regarding canned food
and controlled feedings that did it. Also very helpful was my vet's
suggestion to decreas the food by 1/4 until she began losing weight,
and to continue if she reached a plateau for, say, a month. That
kept it simple enough for a math/measurement idiot like me to deal with.

cybercat
February 22nd 08, 06:57 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote
> Boo's story is one of the reasons I reconsidered letting my clowder
> "snack" on dry food in between feedings. You did a great job getting your
> pretty girl slim and healthy, congratulations!
>

Thank you, CN. Letting her have dry food in the evening, but in controlled
amounts, was a decision I put a lot of thought into. She loves it so, and is
such a ... errr .... reactive, or expressive? cat, it has been a relief not
to
have those little beady rat ******* eyes burning into me all night, hahaha!
(She has lovely, enchanting green eyes until she is mad at you, then I
swear they are hateful and beady.) She will actually pace herself so she
has a little bit in the bowl at all times, I guess it's a comfort to her.

CatNipped[_2_]
February 22nd 08, 08:06 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "CatNipped" > wrote
>> Boo's story is one of the reasons I reconsidered letting my clowder
>> "snack" on dry food in between feedings. You did a great job getting
>> your pretty girl slim and healthy, congratulations!
>>
>
> Thank you, CN. Letting her have dry food in the evening, but in controlled
> amounts, was a decision I put a lot of thought into. She loves it so, and
> is
> such a ... errr .... reactive, or expressive? cat, it has been a relief
> not to
> have those little beady rat ******* eyes burning into me all night,
> hahaha!
> (She has lovely, enchanting green eyes until she is mad at you, then I
> swear they are hateful and beady.) She will actually pace herself so she
> has a little bit in the bowl at all times, I guess it's a comfort to her.

I guess my boys are just typical teen-aged males - they eat everything in
sight and don't leave even one piece of kibble! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

cybercat
February 25th 08, 05:12 PM
"Phil P." > wrote
>
> If you have a copy of her latest blood test results, could you post her
> BUN
> and creatinine values?
>

Phil, I just got off the phone with my vet, and they did not test for these
things.

timbrel2
February 26th 08, 01:49 PM
That is certainly a surprise with a hyperthyroid cat. I had one
(unfortunately was euthanized last December for other causes) and we
tested on a regular basis. However, I'm not a vet

Bliss

On Feb 25, 11:12 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Phil P." > wrote
>
>
>
> > If you have a copy of her latest blood test results, could you post her
> > BUN
> > and creatinine values?
>
> Phil, I just got off the phone with my vet, and they did not test for these
> things.

cybercat
February 26th 08, 07:31 PM
"timbrel2" > wrote in message
...
> That is certainly a surprise with a hyperthyroid cat. I had one
> (unfortunately was euthanized last December for other causes) and we
> tested on a regular basis. However, I'm not a vet
>

Do you mean that they tested Bunn and Creatine even when the thyroid levels
were normal?

Why?

I will certainly ask my vet to test for these things if there is a good
reason to.

Phil P.
February 26th 08, 11:33 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "timbrel2" > wrote in message
> ...
> > That is certainly a surprise with a hyperthyroid cat. I had one
> > (unfortunately was euthanized last December for other causes) and we
> > tested on a regular basis. However, I'm not a vet
> >
>
> Do you mean that they tested Bunn and Creatine even when the thyroid
levels
> were normal?
>
> Why?

Because hyperthyroidism can mask underlying CRF by speeding up the blood
flow and filtering through the kidneys (GRF). When thyroid levels are
brought down to the normal range, renal blood flow and filtering slows down
to the normal rate which will cause BUN and creatinine to rise if the cat
has underlying kidney disease. Normal T4 levels don't mean as much if it
throws the cat into overt renal failure. If your cat's kidney values stay
normal while his thyroid levels are normal- you're home free. But sometimes
you have to do a juggling act and try to strike a balance between an
"acceptable" level of hyperthyroidism and an "acceptable" level of azotemia
(high BUN & cr).



>
> I will certainly ask my vet to test for these things if there is a good
> reason to.

Pawsitively! A CBC and full chemscreen should be done everytime T4 is
checked because hyperthyroidism affects every cell in every organ in the
body.

cybercat
February 27th 08, 01:48 AM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "timbrel2" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > That is certainly a surprise with a hyperthyroid cat. I had one
>> > (unfortunately was euthanized last December for other causes) and we
>> > tested on a regular basis. However, I'm not a vet
>> >
>>
>> Do you mean that they tested Bunn and Creatine even when the thyroid
> levels
>> were normal?
>>
>> Why?
>
> Because hyperthyroidism can mask underlying CRF by speeding up the blood
> flow and filtering through the kidneys (GRF). When thyroid levels are
> brought down to the normal range, renal blood flow and filtering slows
> down
> to the normal rate which will cause BUN and creatinine to rise if the cat
> has underlying kidney disease. Normal T4 levels don't mean as much if it
> throws the cat into overt renal failure. If your cat's kidney values stay
> normal while his thyroid levels are normal- you're home free. But
> sometimes
> you have to do a juggling act and try to strike a balance between an
> "acceptable" level of hyperthyroidism and an "acceptable" level of
> azotemia
> (high BUN & cr).
>
Thanks for explaining this again, Phil. I forgot all about it. Happily,
her T4 levels were not high for long.
>
>>
>> I will certainly ask my vet to test for these things if there is a good
>> reason to.
>
> Pawsitively! A CBC and full chemscreen should be done everytime T4 is
> checked because hyperthyroidism affects every cell in every organ in the
> body.
>

I will certainly have this checked next appointment.

You know, Boo does fine at the vet. The instant anyone touches her, anyone
at all, including the vet tech, she begins to purr. I on the other hand, do
not
do so well, because as soon as I put her in the carrier, she begins the most
ungodly, soulful, mournful "whyyyyy are you slowwwwwwly KILLING ME?"
howling and does not stop until I take her out of the car at the vet. So my
knees are shaky by the time we get there. I mean, I KNOW I am not killing
her, but the way she sounds ....! Thanks again.