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cybercat
February 20th 08, 01:16 PM
We all know that obese cats usually develop lots of health problems,
including arthritis and heart disease.

Well, our fat cat, adopted at age 5 and 18 lbs, is now showing some signs of
arthritis at age 13, almost 14. But there is another thing her overweight
did to her that I wanted to mention, for those of you who have young cats
you may be overfeeding.

When I got her down to 9 pounds, I was concerned because you could feel
every vertebrae in her spine, though she had plenty of meat on her
elsewhere. I asked the vet if she was too thin, and she said, "no, I think
she just needs exercise." We talked some more and figured it out--even
though we play with her with the cat fishing pole thing that you cast, that
has a feather on it, and other things--she was so fat for so long, she
stopped jumping up on things. We were so used to it, we just didn't notice
the way she climbs up on the couches and beds instead of jumping. It is
those muscles which have atrophied, the reason we could feel her vertebrae.
(And why I put a pound back on her ...)

Another thing I think is related to her being very fat from youth is that
she really doesn't play as much as our other cat, I think because it was
just hard to haul that bulk around.

Just food for thought. She is very happy now, and we hope she stays healthy
and happy for a long time.

CatNipped[_2_]
February 22nd 08, 02:22 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> We all know that obese cats usually develop lots of health problems,
> including arthritis and heart disease.
>
> Well, our fat cat, adopted at age 5 and 18 lbs, is now showing some signs
> of arthritis at age 13, almost 14. But there is another thing her
> overweight did to her that I wanted to mention, for those of you who have
> young cats you may be overfeeding.
>
> When I got her down to 9 pounds, I was concerned because you could feel
> every vertebrae in her spine, though she had plenty of meat on her
> elsewhere. I asked the vet if she was too thin, and she said, "no, I think
> she just needs exercise." We talked some more and figured it out--even
> though we play with her with the cat fishing pole thing that you cast,
> that has a feather on it, and other things--she was so fat for so long,
> she stopped jumping up on things. We were so used to it, we just didn't
> notice the way she climbs up on the couches and beds instead of jumping.
> It is those muscles which have atrophied, the reason we could feel her
> vertebrae. (And why I put a pound back on her ...)
>
> Another thing I think is related to her being very fat from youth is that
> she really doesn't play as much as our other cat, I think because it was
> just hard to haul that bulk around.
>
> Just food for thought. She is very happy now, and we hope she stays
> healthy and happy for a long time.

Good job! I hope she has many, many happy healthy years with you - you're a
good meow-my! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped