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View Full Version : Question about Feline Leukemia and FIV test


February 29th 08, 05:10 PM
As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I had
the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
question is, should I have her tested again? Meaning, how quickly
does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?
If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?

Thanks.

S.
**visit me and my cats at www.island-cats.com**

blkcatgal
February 29th 08, 10:10 PM
Cindy,
Did you ever have a cat that tested negative and then later tested positive?

Guess I need to keep my other cats away from this new one...but for how
long? I can't keep them separate for 3 months.

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I had
>> the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
>> tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
>> question is, should I have her tested again?
>
> I would. And I have done so on more than one occasion when I was fostering
> cats, even when the shelter already had the cat tested.
>
>>Meaning, how quickly
>> does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?
>
> I can't remember the window. It's at least a few weeks, but I think it
> might be up to three months (someone else might know better than I do).
>
>> If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
>> caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?
>
> Probably not.
> Best regards,
> --Cindy S.
>

mc
February 29th 08, 10:29 PM
Hi,

I am going through the whole thing with a stray cat we are taking in.
The waiting period is about two months.

Double check with the vet though to be sure.

Thanks,
Melissa

mc
February 29th 08, 10:34 PM
Sorry about the double post...

They generally say it is, like human aides, most usually transmitted
sexually. If that is a female cat, and your two boys are vaccinated...
If the female is not pregnant, there is a pretty good chance that the
original test is good to go on.

Do double check with your vet. Feline Aids can be spread in other
ways... through bites and so forth... saliva... But usually it is
associated with sexual contact just human AIDS is.

It is better to have the test done again... but if that kitty that you
have there isn't pregnant or anything... chances are good you are
safe.

BUT, better to go with caution. That is just my feeling.

Thanks,
Melissa

blkcatgal
February 29th 08, 10:35 PM
Melissa, what are you doing in the meantime...just keeping the stray
separate from your other cats for 2 months? That isn't going to be easy to
do...

S.
"mc" > wrote in message
...
> Hi,
>
> I am going through the whole thing with a stray cat we are taking in.
> The waiting period is about two months.
>
> Double check with the vet though to be sure.
>
> Thanks,
> Melissa

blkcatgal
February 29th 08, 10:39 PM
The stray was not pregnant...she is spayed now. What about leukemia? My
other 2 cats have not been vaccinated for leukemia since they are strictly
indoor cats.

I just brought the stray home today....she is separated from my other 2 but
now I'm concerned about introducing all of them.

"mc" > wrote in message
...
> Sorry about the double post...
>
> They generally say it is, like human aides, most usually transmitted
> sexually. If that is a female cat, and your two boys are vaccinated...
> If the female is not pregnant, there is a pretty good chance that the
> original test is good to go on.
>
> Do double check with your vet. Feline Aids can be spread in other
> ways... through bites and so forth... saliva... But usually it is
> associated with sexual contact just human AIDS is.
>
> It is better to have the test done again... but if that kitty that you
> have there isn't pregnant or anything... chances are good you are
> safe.
>
> BUT, better to go with caution. That is just my feeling.
>
> Thanks,
> Melissa

Phil P.
February 29th 08, 10:50 PM
> wrote in message
...
> As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I had
> the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
> tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
> question is, should I have her tested again? Meaning, how quickly
> does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?

Depends on which test was run. The in-house ELISA (enzyme-linked
immunosorbent assay) Snap test can detect *circulating* FeLV antigen in
about 2-4 weeks- possibly less in some cats- after infection. The IFA
(immunofluorescent antibody) assay- which can only be run buy a diagnostic
lab- can take ~4 weeks, and sometimes up to 12 weeks to detect an infection.
The IFA takes longer to produce a postive result because it tests for FeLV
in the leukocytes and platelets which usually means virus has to reach the
bone marrow before it can be detected.

For FIV- it usually takes about 8 -12 weeks for antibodies to develop after
the initial infection. Kittens <6-8 months old can test positive for FIV
from receiving FIV antibodies from their mother through colostrum *without*
being infected. An FIV-vaccinated cat will also test postive as well as her
kittens. .



> If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
> caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?

Probably not-- *but* given her age and the length of time she has lived
outdoors, its very unlikely the results were false negatives. False postives
are common because the ELISA Snaps are very, very sensitive- which also
makes them very unlikely to produce false negatives..

Phil

>
> Thanks.
>
> S.
> **visit me and my cats at www.island-cats.com**

blkcatgal
February 29th 08, 11:04 PM
Thanks, Phil. The cat was tested at my vet's office...I assume it would be
the ELISA test because they were able to get immediate results.

So do you think I'm safe with introducing the new cat to my other ones? I
don't plan on doing it immediately, probably in a week or two. My current
cats have not been vaccinated for leukemia (well, one was initally but I
haven't updated his vaccination in at least 3 years).

I can have the new cat retested....how soon should I do so?

"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:O_%[email protected]
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I had
>> the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
>> tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
>> question is, should I have her tested again? Meaning, how quickly
>> does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?
>
> Depends on which test was run. The in-house ELISA (enzyme-linked
> immunosorbent assay) Snap test can detect *circulating* FeLV antigen in
> about 2-4 weeks- possibly less in some cats- after infection. The IFA
> (immunofluorescent antibody) assay- which can only be run buy a diagnostic
> lab- can take ~4 weeks, and sometimes up to 12 weeks to detect an
> infection.
> The IFA takes longer to produce a postive result because it tests for FeLV
> in the leukocytes and platelets which usually means virus has to reach the
> bone marrow before it can be detected.
>
> For FIV- it usually takes about 8 -12 weeks for antibodies to develop
> after
> the initial infection. Kittens <6-8 months old can test positive for FIV
> from receiving FIV antibodies from their mother through colostrum
> *without*
> being infected. An FIV-vaccinated cat will also test postive as well as
> her
> kittens. .
>
>
>
>> If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
>> caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?
>
> Probably not-- *but* given her age and the length of time she has lived
> outdoors, its very unlikely the results were false negatives. False
> postives
> are common because the ELISA Snaps are very, very sensitive- which also
> makes them very unlikely to produce false negatives..
>
> Phil
>
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> S.
>> **visit me and my cats at www.island-cats.com**
>
>

mc
February 29th 08, 11:37 PM
I dare not advise. But I do have the cat I am taking in seperate from
my two boys. I just don't dare to risk it. He is in a large caged area
in my warm barn. I know... I feel really badly about it, but he is
safe and warm and dry and well fed and I spend a good amount of time
there with him. I cannot wait to bring him inside.

I was told, with another stray we brought in that it is usually
sexually transmitted - not 100 % of the time, but the risks are
greater for sexually active cats. So if your cat has been neutered and
showed no signs of pregnancy... I think you are pretty safe.

BUT, I would consult the vet. I am not an expert by any stretch.

Good luck :-) You are doing the right thing :-) You will find that is
probably going to be one of the nicest cats you have ever had ;-)

LOL

Let us know how it goes ;-)

Phil P.
March 1st 08, 12:38 AM
"blkcatgal" > wrote in message
. ..
> Thanks, Phil. The cat was tested at my vet's office...I assume it would
be
> the ELISA test because they were able to get immediate results.


Snap negatives are very reliable- its the positives that aren't.


>
> So do you think I'm safe with introducing the new cat to my other ones? I
> don't plan on doing it immediately, probably in a week or two. My current
> cats have not been vaccinated for leukemia (well, one was initially but I
> haven't updated his vaccination in at least 3 years).
>
> I can have the new cat retested....how soon should I do so?


If you do the introduction the right way (see my other post to you), it
should take about 2-3 weeks before you allow the cats to mingle. That would
be about 3-4 weeks after the new cat was initially tested. If you want peace
of mind, that would be a good time to have her retested. If she tests
negative again for FeLV after a month- she's probably negative. If you want
to retest her for FIV, you should wait at least 3 months from her last test-
although I think an FIV retest is unnecessary.


Good luck with your cat! She's a lucky a cat because she has you.

Phil


>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:O_%[email protected]
> >
> > > wrote in message
> >
...
> >> As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I had
> >> the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
> >> tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
> >> question is, should I have her tested again? Meaning, how quickly
> >> does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?
> >
> > Depends on which test was run. The in-house ELISA (enzyme-linked
> > immunosorbent assay) Snap test can detect *circulating* FeLV antigen in
> > about 2-4 weeks- possibly less in some cats- after infection. The IFA
> > (immunofluorescent antibody) assay- which can only be run buy a
diagnostic
> > lab- can take ~4 weeks, and sometimes up to 12 weeks to detect an
> > infection.
> > The IFA takes longer to produce a postive result because it tests for
FeLV
> > in the leukocytes and platelets which usually means virus has to reach
the
> > bone marrow before it can be detected.
> >
> > For FIV- it usually takes about 8 -12 weeks for antibodies to develop
> > after
> > the initial infection. Kittens <6-8 months old can test positive for FIV
> > from receiving FIV antibodies from their mother through colostrum
> > *without*
> > being infected. An FIV-vaccinated cat will also test positive as well as
> > her
> > kittens. .
> >
> >
> >
> >> If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
> >> caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?
> >
> > Probably not-- *but* given her age and the length of time she has lived
> > outdoors, its very unlikely the results were false negatives. False
> > positives
> > are common because the ELISA Snaps are very, very sensitive- which also
> > makes them very unlikely to produce false negatives..
> >
> > Phil
> >
> >>
> >> Thanks.
> >>
> >> S.
> >> **visit me and my cats at www.island-cats.com**
> >
> >
>
>

blkcatgal
March 1st 08, 12:53 AM
Thanks, Phil. You can see that my paranoia is setting in! :-) I wasn't
planning on having the cats "meet" each other for at least a couple of
weeks. I'm sure the new cat is fine but I'll probably have her retested in
a couple of weeks just for my own peace of mind.

S.

"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "blkcatgal" > wrote in message
> . ..
>> Thanks, Phil. The cat was tested at my vet's office...I assume it would
> be
>> the ELISA test because they were able to get immediate results.
>
>
> Snap negatives are very reliable- its the positives that aren't.
>
>
>>
>> So do you think I'm safe with introducing the new cat to my other ones?
>> I
>> don't plan on doing it immediately, probably in a week or two. My
>> current
>> cats have not been vaccinated for leukemia (well, one was initially but I
>> haven't updated his vaccination in at least 3 years).
>>
>> I can have the new cat retested....how soon should I do so?
>
>
> If you do the introduction the right way (see my other post to you), it
> should take about 2-3 weeks before you allow the cats to mingle. That
> would
> be about 3-4 weeks after the new cat was initially tested. If you want
> peace
> of mind, that would be a good time to have her retested. If she tests
> negative again for FeLV after a month- she's probably negative. If you
> want
> to retest her for FIV, you should wait at least 3 months from her last
> test-
> although I think an FIV retest is unnecessary.
>
>
> Good luck with your cat! She's a lucky a cat because she has you.
>
> Phil
>
>
>>
>> "Phil P." > wrote in message
>> news:O_%[email protected]
>> >
>> > > wrote in message
>> >
> ...
>> >> As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I had
>> >> the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
>> >> tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
>> >> question is, should I have her tested again? Meaning, how quickly
>> >> does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?
>> >
>> > Depends on which test was run. The in-house ELISA (enzyme-linked
>> > immunosorbent assay) Snap test can detect *circulating* FeLV antigen in
>> > about 2-4 weeks- possibly less in some cats- after infection. The IFA
>> > (immunofluorescent antibody) assay- which can only be run buy a
> diagnostic
>> > lab- can take ~4 weeks, and sometimes up to 12 weeks to detect an
>> > infection.
>> > The IFA takes longer to produce a postive result because it tests for
> FeLV
>> > in the leukocytes and platelets which usually means virus has to reach
> the
>> > bone marrow before it can be detected.
>> >
>> > For FIV- it usually takes about 8 -12 weeks for antibodies to develop
>> > after
>> > the initial infection. Kittens <6-8 months old can test positive for
>> > FIV
>> > from receiving FIV antibodies from their mother through colostrum
>> > *without*
>> > being infected. An FIV-vaccinated cat will also test positive as well
>> > as
>> > her
>> > kittens. .
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >> If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
>> >> caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?
>> >
>> > Probably not-- *but* given her age and the length of time she has lived
>> > outdoors, its very unlikely the results were false negatives. False
>> > positives
>> > are common because the ELISA Snaps are very, very sensitive- which also
>> > makes them very unlikely to produce false negatives..
>> >
>> > Phil
>> >
>> >>
>> >> Thanks.
>> >>
>> >> S.
>> >> **visit me and my cats at www.island-cats.com**
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
>

blkcatgal
March 1st 08, 02:04 PM
Thanks, Cindy. I will talk with my vet.

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
>
> "blkcatgal" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Cindy,
>> Did you ever have a cat that tested negative and then later tested
>> positive?
>
> No.
>>
>> Guess I need to keep my other cats away from this new one...but for how
>> long? I can't keep them separate for 3 months.
>
> I understand. I think you should ask your vet to advise you.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.
>
>
>

Phil P.
March 1st 08, 02:45 PM
"blkcatgal" > wrote in message
. ..
> Thanks, Phil. You can see that my paranoia is setting in! :-)


Don't ever think you're crazy for being paranoid about your cats. Just
remember: You only have to be right *once* to make all the precautions and
worrying worthwhile! ;-)


I wasn't
> planning on having the cats "meet" each other for at least a couple of
> weeks.

That's the way to do it! If you rush the introduction you run the risk of
the cats getting into a fight which can have permanent adverse effects on
their relationship. Once a cat is attacked, she might take a defensive
posture whenever she see the attacker. This could trigger attacks even if
the attacker had no intentions of attacking.

I know you know how to handle it- but here's a refresher:
http://maxshouse.com/introducing_cats.htm


I'm sure the new cat is fine but I'll probably have her retested in
> a couple of weeks just for my own peace of mind.

I'm sure she's fine, too. I'll be looking forward to seeing some pictures
of her.

Phil




>
> S.
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "blkcatgal" > wrote in message
> > . ..
> >> Thanks, Phil. The cat was tested at my vet's office...I assume it
would
> > be
> >> the ELISA test because they were able to get immediate results.
> >
> >
> > Snap negatives are very reliable- its the positives that aren't.
> >
> >
> >>
> >> So do you think I'm safe with introducing the new cat to my other ones?
> >> I
> >> don't plan on doing it immediately, probably in a week or two. My
> >> current
> >> cats have not been vaccinated for leukemia (well, one was initially but
I
> >> haven't updated his vaccination in at least 3 years).
> >>
> >> I can have the new cat retested....how soon should I do so?
> >
> >
> > If you do the introduction the right way (see my other post to you), it
> > should take about 2-3 weeks before you allow the cats to mingle. That
> > would
> > be about 3-4 weeks after the new cat was initially tested. If you want
> > peace
> > of mind, that would be a good time to have her retested. If she tests
> > negative again for FeLV after a month- she's probably negative. If you
> > want
> > to retest her for FIV, you should wait at least 3 months from her last
> > test-
> > although I think an FIV retest is unnecessary.
> >
> >
> > Good luck with your cat! She's a lucky a cat because she has you.
> >
> > Phil
> >
> >
> >>
> >> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> >> news:O_%[email protected]
> >> >
> >> > > wrote in message
> >> >
> >
...
> >> >> As I posted earlier, I am taking in a stray cat that we found. I
had
> >> >> the cat tested for leukemia and FIV and she is negative. She was
> >> >> tested one week after we caught her and brought her inside. My
> >> >> question is, should I have her tested again? Meaning, how quickly
> >> >> does something show up in a cat's system to be detected by the test?
> >> >
> >> > Depends on which test was run. The in-house ELISA (enzyme-linked
> >> > immunosorbent assay) Snap test can detect *circulating* FeLV antigen
in
> >> > about 2-4 weeks- possibly less in some cats- after infection. The IFA
> >> > (immunofluorescent antibody) assay- which can only be run buy a
> > diagnostic
> >> > lab- can take ~4 weeks, and sometimes up to 12 weeks to detect an
> >> > infection.
> >> > The IFA takes longer to produce a postive result because it tests for
> > FeLV
> >> > in the leukocytes and platelets which usually means virus has to
reach
> > the
> >> > bone marrow before it can be detected.
> >> >
> >> > For FIV- it usually takes about 8 -12 weeks for antibodies to develop
> >> > after
> >> > the initial infection. Kittens <6-8 months old can test positive for
> >> > FIV
> >> > from receiving FIV antibodies from their mother through colostrum
> >> > *without*
> >> > being infected. An FIV-vaccinated cat will also test positive as well
> >> > as
> >> > her
> >> > kittens. .
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >> If she had come in contact with an infected cat the day before I
> >> >> caught her, would that show up in a test done a week later?
> >> >
> >> > Probably not-- *but* given her age and the length of time she has
lived
> >> > outdoors, its very unlikely the results were false negatives. False
> >> > positives
> >> > are common because the ELISA Snaps are very, very sensitive- which
also
> >> > makes them very unlikely to produce false negatives..
> >> >
> >> > Phil
> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >> Thanks.
> >> >>
> >> >> S.
> >> >> **visit me and my cats at www.island-cats.com**
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>
>