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David McCracken
March 11th 08, 07:40 AM
The first pet I've ever owned is very sick and is being treated for
lymphoma. Despite her illness, she still has the strength to do her usual
routine; she still eats, uses the litter box, etc. Her personality is still
there.

I've had some friends tell me they think I'm prolonging her suffering and
she should be killed. In three months, I've spent thousands on chemo
treatments and other tests and procedures, as I would for any daughter of
mine.

Personally, I believe I'm in the best position to judge whether or not she's
suffering. She's certainly not in any pain, is still affectionate --she's
still herself in many respects.

But since this is my first cat and I've never had to euthanize an animal, I
do wonder if I'm dragging things out.

I'm curious how other, more experienced pet owners out there have wrestled
with this. Some people have told me I'll "just know" when the right time
will be.

Thanks and I appreciate any insight.

T
March 11th 08, 10:25 AM
In article >,
says...
> The first pet I've ever owned is very sick and is being treated for
> lymphoma. Despite her illness, she still has the strength to do her usual
> routine; she still eats, uses the litter box, etc. Her personality is still
> there.
>
> I've had some friends tell me they think I'm prolonging her suffering and
> she should be killed. In three months, I've spent thousands on chemo
> treatments and other tests and procedures, as I would for any daughter of
> mine.
>
> Personally, I believe I'm in the best position to judge whether or not she's
> suffering. She's certainly not in any pain, is still affectionate --she's
> still herself in many respects.
>
> But since this is my first cat and I've never had to euthanize an animal, I
> do wonder if I'm dragging things out.
>
> I'm curious how other, more experienced pet owners out there have wrestled
> with this. Some people have told me I'll "just know" when the right time
> will be.
>
> Thanks and I appreciate any insight.

I think you already know the answer. You've had your pet long enough
that you'll be able to tell when she just doesn't have the strength to
go on.

Stan Brown
March 11th 08, 11:33 AM
Tue, 11 Mar 2008 02:40:22 -0400 from David McCracken
>:
> The first pet I've ever owned is very sick and is being treated for
> lymphoma. Despite her illness, she still has the strength to do her
> usual routine; she still eats, uses the litter box, etc. Her
> personality is still there.
>
> I've had some friends tell me they think I'm prolonging her
> suffering and she should be killed. In three months, I've spent
> thousands on chemo treatments and other tests and procedures, as I
> would for any daughter of mine.

I would not take advice from your friends on this.

> Personally, I believe I'm in the best position to judge whether or
> not she's suffering. She's certainly not in any pain, is still
> affectionate --she's still herself in many respects.

I think this is something to discuss with your vet. You may not be
aware if your pet is suffering in a non-obvious way. Your vet will be
involved n the actual euthanasia, when the time comes, so it makes
sense to prepare in advance with her.

> But since this is my first cat and I've never had to euthanize an animal, I
> do wonder if I'm dragging things out.

Again, this is something to ask your vet. For example, my Dexter the
Wonder Cat had progressive kidney failure, but the vet assured me
that he was not in pain. He gradually developed some stiffness in
walking and jumping, and then finally one Saturday morning he took a
very dramatic turn for the worse. Because I had discussed this with
the vet in advance, I knew what it means and she had me take him in
to the office.

> I'm curious how other, more experienced pet owners out there have
> wrestled with this. Some people have told me I'll "just know" when
> the right time will be.

Well, maybe you'll just know, but maybe you want to be forearmed with
some medical knowledge so you know what to look for.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

dgk
March 11th 08, 01:50 PM
On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 02:40:22 -0400, "David McCracken"
> wrote:

>The first pet I've ever owned is very sick and is being treated for
>lymphoma. Despite her illness, she still has the strength to do her usual
>routine; she still eats, uses the litter box, etc. Her personality is still
>there.
>
>I've had some friends tell me they think I'm prolonging her suffering and
>she should be killed. In three months, I've spent thousands on chemo
>treatments and other tests and procedures, as I would for any daughter of
>mine.
>
>Personally, I believe I'm in the best position to judge whether or not she's
>suffering. She's certainly not in any pain, is still affectionate --she's
>still herself in many respects.
>
>But since this is my first cat and I've never had to euthanize an animal, I
>do wonder if I'm dragging things out.
>
>I'm curious how other, more experienced pet owners out there have wrestled
>with this. Some people have told me I'll "just know" when the right time
>will be.
>
>Thanks and I appreciate any insight.
>
>

My favorite cat had lymphoma and it was just real hard to tell when it
was time. He was taking prednisone alternating with a chemo drug, the
name escapes me at the moment. Luka something I think. Anyway, from
the time he got sick he seemed to be ok once on chemo, but he never
climbed the cat tree again. He used to sit on the bottom level where I
put a very soft pad for him.

I think that was a clue that he was always a bit dizzy and not really
feeling well. I went with the treatment (and yes, the whole thing was
very expensive) because I was told that he could live another 18
months with a high quality of life. He didn't. He lived maybe 5 months
and I'm not at all sure that he had much of a happy time at the end.

Cats do cover up their pain and discomfort very well so it can be
tough to know what to do. Unlike dealing with a human daughter, cats
can't talk and you can't euthanize a human even though we might want
to.

I hated the daily struggle to get him to take his pills. It got easier
as it went along but he knew it was coming and always put up a
struggle. I ended up getting them compounded into a cream that I could
just put in his ear. Not as effective perhaps, but less trouble.

I don't think you're at the point of euthanasia yet. If she's still
doing the things she always did, then let her keep on. I did wait too
long with Nico though. If you notice that she no longer climbs the cat
tree, or that she is losing interest in things that used to attract
her, then it's getting close. It's the toughest part of pet ownership.

Rene S.
March 11th 08, 05:29 PM
>
> I would not take advice from your friends on this.

I second this. People have different views on this. You have to follow
your vet's advice and your heart. Don't listen to what others think.

>
> > Personally, I believe I'm in the best position to judge whether or
> > not she's suffering. She's certainly not in any pain, is still
> > affectionate --she's still herself in many respects.
>
> I think this is something to discuss with your vet. You may not be
> aware if your pet is suffering in a non-obvious way. Your vet will be
> involved n the actual euthanasia, when the time comes, so it makes
> sense to prepare in advance with her.

Cats can be very stoic animals and don't always show pain until it's
severe. Certainly talk to your vet about your concerns.


> > I'm curious how other, more experienced pet owners out there have
> > wrestled with this. Some people have told me I'll "just know" when
> > the right time will be.
>
> Well, maybe you'll just know, but maybe you want to be forearmed with
> some medical knowledge so you know what to look for.

Having some medical knowledge AND being in tune with your cat can help
you here. I feel for you. It's not easy making "that" decision. You
sound like a caring, rational owner. I'm sure you will do the right
thing.

Rene S.
March 11th 08, 06:42 PM
I would like to add a little something else. the fact is that most of
the time those of us that adopt and love our cats (or other pets) are
eventually going to be faced making the decision on when it's time to
euthanize. It's tough and it's a fact that some people do wait too
long, so I think this is a good place to post this article. It is an
excellent overview of euthanasia and ends with a wonderful article
that I think will help the majority of people that read it. I would
advise people read it well before they are faced with having to make a
decision.

http://specialneedspets.org/euthanasia.htm

David McCracken
March 12th 08, 05:48 AM
"David McCracken" > wrote in message
...
> The first pet I've ever owned is very sick and is being treated for
> lymphoma. Despite her illness, she still has the strength to do her usual
> routine; she still eats, uses the litter box, etc. Her personality is
> still there.
>
> I've had some friends tell me they think I'm prolonging her suffering and
> she should be killed. In three months, I've spent thousands on chemo
> treatments and other tests and procedures, as I would for any daughter of
> mine.
>
> Personally, I believe I'm in the best position to judge whether or not
> she's suffering. She's certainly not in any pain, is still
> affectionate --she's still herself in many respects.
>
> But since this is my first cat and I've never had to euthanize an animal,
> I do wonder if I'm dragging things out.
>
> I'm curious how other, more experienced pet owners out there have wrestled
> with this. Some people have told me I'll "just know" when the right time
> will be.
>
> Thanks and I appreciate any insight.
>
>
>

I want to thank all of the people who have replied. I very much appreciate
the insight.

Thanks,
David