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jmc
March 11th 08, 09:45 AM
I thought Meep was having a cystitis attack this morning. She was going
to the litterbox every 10 minutes or so, but not actually leaving more
than a small amount behind. She did not seem distressed or in pain.
So, of course, I called the vet, and called work to tell them I'd be late.

Then, of course, she stopped, and went to bed, as she does in the morning.

Took her to the vet, nothing in particular was found, temperature
normal, bladder had some urine but not much, no physically palpable
signs of cystitis (vet did not take a urine sample). "She is not
blocked". They took bloods. I mentioned my concern about her recent
weight loss. No treatment was suggested.

So I took her home, and went to work.

Came home, litterbox had not been used, she was still sleeping. Now
that she's gotten up though, she's still going to the litterbox every 10
or 15 minutes, sometimes leaving a little urine behind, sometimes
leaving none at all. I've watched her, it really doesn't look like
she's in pain or straining, just nothing's coming out.

I'm thinking that she is feeling like she needs to pee, even if she
doesn't actually.

Anybody have any experience with this?

jmc

mc
March 11th 08, 01:59 PM
I am not a veterinarian but it sounds exactly like something that
occurred with my cat Max. We had a very similar incident.

I had noticed some inappropriate urinating with Max... he was not
using the litterbox.

When I took him to the vet they told me he was not blocked because if
he was, his bladder would be quite large. But I know that he had
managed to eliminate most of his urine just prior to going to the vets
office and so they kept him to observe him and the next day they
called me to tell me that, in fact, he was blocked again.

It is possible, I think, that your cat, prior to visiting the vets
office, eliminated his/her urine. The vet then determined that your
cat (my Max) wasn't blocked because if the cat was blocked that
bladder would have been a lot fuller.

If the cat is not using the litterbox it is a pretty good sign
something is wrong, and sometimes even with blockages they do manage
to eliminate their urine.

I sincerely hope this helps, but even more so that you and your vet
can figure out the cause.

Good luck ;-)

mc
March 11th 08, 02:04 PM
I apologize to have made the last post sooooo long! All I am trying to
say is that when cats become blocked they may not show all the signs.

I was not there at the vets office when they checked Max, but I can
tell you he did not appear to have any blockage when I first brought
him in to the vet, however, after keeping him over night they found
that he was, in fact, blocked.

And it sounds like you kitty isn't using the litterbox as normal.

Thanks, hope much success with finally getting to the problem.

Melissa

Phil P.
March 11th 08, 08:47 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> I thought Meep was having a cystitis attack this morning. She was going
> to the litterbox every 10 minutes or so, but not actually leaving more
> than a small amount behind. She did not seem distressed or in pain.
> So, of course, I called the vet, and called work to tell them I'd be late.
>
> Then, of course, she stopped, and went to bed, as she does in the morning.
>
> Took her to the vet, nothing in particular was found, temperature
> normal, bladder had some urine but not much, no physically palpable
> signs of cystitis (vet did not take a urine sample). "She is not
> blocked". They took bloods. I mentioned my concern about her recent
> weight loss. No treatment was suggested.
>
> So I took her home, and went to work.
>
> Came home, litterbox had not been used, she was still sleeping. Now
> that she's gotten up though, she's still going to the litterbox every 10
> or 15 minutes, sometimes leaving a little urine behind, sometimes
> leaving none at all. I've watched her, it really doesn't look like
> she's in pain or straining, just nothing's coming out.
>
> I'm thinking that she is feeling like she needs to pee, even if she
> doesn't actually.
>


That's a classic sign of interstitial cystitis. Inflammation in the bladder
and/or urethra of cats with interstitial cystitis causes a nervous sensation
that mimics the sensation that's normally induced by a full bladder. The
nervous impulses that control urination are constantly stimulated so that
the urge to urinate is constant whether the bladder is full or empty.

Phil

jmc
March 11th 08, 09:01 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 6:17 AM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> I thought Meep was having a cystitis attack this morning. She was going
>> to the litterbox every 10 minutes or so, but not actually leaving more
>> than a small amount behind. She did not seem distressed or in pain.
>> So, of course, I called the vet, and called work to tell them I'd be late.
>>
>> Then, of course, she stopped, and went to bed, as she does in the morning.
>>
>> Took her to the vet, nothing in particular was found, temperature
>> normal, bladder had some urine but not much, no physically palpable
>> signs of cystitis (vet did not take a urine sample). "She is not
>> blocked". They took bloods. I mentioned my concern about her recent
>> weight loss. No treatment was suggested.
>>
>> So I took her home, and went to work.
>>
>> Came home, litterbox had not been used, she was still sleeping. Now
>> that she's gotten up though, she's still going to the litterbox every 10
>> or 15 minutes, sometimes leaving a little urine behind, sometimes
>> leaving none at all. I've watched her, it really doesn't look like
>> she's in pain or straining, just nothing's coming out.
>>
>> I'm thinking that she is feeling like she needs to pee, even if she
>> doesn't actually.
>>
>
>
> That's a classic sign of interstitial cystitis. Inflammation in the bladder
> and/or urethra of cats with interstitial cystitis causes a nervous sensation
> that mimics the sensation that's normally induced by a full bladder. The
> nervous impulses that control urination are constantly stimulated so that
> the urge to urinate is constant whether the bladder is full or empty.
>
> Phil
>
>

If it isn't caused by a bacteria (they usually give her an antibiotic,
but I don't think that's the issue) what is the usual treatment in the
US? She's still doing it, but not as frequently as before. Still
without the urgency/distress she has show during previous cystitis attacks.

jmc

---MIKE---
March 12th 08, 12:29 AM
I had this happen to me many years ago. After climbing Mt. Carragain
(in NH) as my final 4000 footer, we celebrated on top with some sort of
alcoholic beverage (whisky sours?). I was dehydrated from a strenuous
climb and should have been drinking lots of water. On the trip back
down I had constant urges to urinate but could produce nothing. This
continued for the whole five miles and on into the evening. A very
uncomfortable sensation.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

mc
March 12th 08, 03:50 AM
Again, I am not a veterinarian, but my thoughts are that anti-biotics
are prescribed because of the inflamation in the bladder (as Phil
wrote) and also possibly as a precautionary measure. I know that
cystitis issues can also cause damage to the urethra.

My cat had to undergo the surgery for the same problem. However, some
people are able to address the issue with specific drugs and diet may
actually play a very significant role as well.

My understanding, limited as it may be, is that cystitis can recur and
symptoms may come and go as was apparent with my cat.

I hope you can find help for your kitty or, better yet, the symptoms
disapear for good.

Take care.

Phil P.
March 12th 08, 08:25 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 6:17 AM):
> > "jmc" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> I thought Meep was having a cystitis attack this morning. She was
going
> >> to the litterbox every 10 minutes or so, but not actually leaving more
> >> than a small amount behind. She did not seem distressed or in pain.
> >> So, of course, I called the vet, and called work to tell them I'd be
late.
> >>
> >> Then, of course, she stopped, and went to bed, as she does in the
morning.
> >>
> >> Took her to the vet, nothing in particular was found, temperature
> >> normal, bladder had some urine but not much, no physically palpable
> >> signs of cystitis (vet did not take a urine sample). "She is not
> >> blocked". They took bloods. I mentioned my concern about her recent
> >> weight loss. No treatment was suggested.
> >>
> >> So I took her home, and went to work.
> >>
> >> Came home, litterbox had not been used, she was still sleeping. Now
> >> that she's gotten up though, she's still going to the litterbox every
10
> >> or 15 minutes, sometimes leaving a little urine behind, sometimes
> >> leaving none at all. I've watched her, it really doesn't look like
> >> she's in pain or straining, just nothing's coming out.
> >>
> >> I'm thinking that she is feeling like she needs to pee, even if she
> >> doesn't actually.
> >>
> >
> >
> > That's a classic sign of interstitial cystitis. Inflammation in the
bladder
> > and/or urethra of cats with interstitial cystitis causes a nervous
sensation
> > that mimics the sensation that's normally induced by a full bladder. The
> > nervous impulses that control urination are constantly stimulated so
that
> > the urge to urinate is constant whether the bladder is full or empty.
> >
> > Phil
> >
> >
>
> If it isn't caused by a bacteria (they usually give her an antibiotic,

Interstitial cystitis in cats is believed to be caused by a defect in the
GAG (glycosaminoglycan) layer that coats the bladder wall (epithelium) and
allows urine to penetrate the urothelium (the special epithelium of the
bladder) and induce inflammation. Another theory is that cats with FIC have
an increased density of sensory afferent neurons in the bladder which makes
them more sensitive to some components in urine. It could be either/or or
combination of both because the standard treatment seems to work in either
case. But then again, FIC is self-limiting so its difficult to tell what
really works.


> but I don't think that's the issue) what is the usual treatment in the
> US?

First: Minimize stress as much as possible. Stress can aggravate the
symptoms or even trigger an attack.

Second: Feed only canned food. The higher water intake dilutes noxious
substances in the urine. The higher water intake also results in more
frequent urination which reduces bladder contact with urine.

Third: A GAG supplement (Cosequin for Cats) to help maintain the GAG layer
of the bladder.

Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it reduces
stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should only
be used in cats that stress out easily.


hth,

Best of luck,

Phil

jmc
March 12th 08, 08:21 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 6:17 AM):
>>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> I thought Meep was having a cystitis attack this morning. She was
> going
>>>> to the litterbox every 10 minutes or so, but not actually leaving more
>>>> than a small amount behind. She did not seem distressed or in pain.
>>>> So, of course, I called the vet, and called work to tell them I'd be
> late.
>>>> Then, of course, she stopped, and went to bed, as she does in the
> morning.
>>>> Took her to the vet, nothing in particular was found, temperature
>>>> normal, bladder had some urine but not much, no physically palpable
>>>> signs of cystitis (vet did not take a urine sample). "She is not
>>>> blocked". They took bloods. I mentioned my concern about her recent
>>>> weight loss. No treatment was suggested.
>>>>
>>>> So I took her home, and went to work.
>>>>
>>>> Came home, litterbox had not been used, she was still sleeping. Now
>>>> that she's gotten up though, she's still going to the litterbox every
> 10
>>>> or 15 minutes, sometimes leaving a little urine behind, sometimes
>>>> leaving none at all. I've watched her, it really doesn't look like
>>>> she's in pain or straining, just nothing's coming out.
>>>>
>>>> I'm thinking that she is feeling like she needs to pee, even if she
>>>> doesn't actually.
>>>>
>>>
>>> That's a classic sign of interstitial cystitis. Inflammation in the
> bladder
>>> and/or urethra of cats with interstitial cystitis causes a nervous
> sensation
>>> that mimics the sensation that's normally induced by a full bladder. The
>>> nervous impulses that control urination are constantly stimulated so
> that
>>> the urge to urinate is constant whether the bladder is full or empty.
>>>
>>> Phil
>>>
>>>
>> If it isn't caused by a bacteria (they usually give her an antibiotic,
>
> Interstitial cystitis in cats is believed to be caused by a defect in the
> GAG (glycosaminoglycan) layer that coats the bladder wall (epithelium) and
> allows urine to penetrate the urothelium (the special epithelium of the
> bladder) and induce inflammation. Another theory is that cats with FIC have
> an increased density of sensory afferent neurons in the bladder which makes
> them more sensitive to some components in urine. It could be either/or or
> combination of both because the standard treatment seems to work in either
> case. But then again, FIC is self-limiting so its difficult to tell what
> really works.
>
>
>> but I don't think that's the issue) what is the usual treatment in the
>> US?
>
> First: Minimize stress as much as possible. Stress can aggravate the
> symptoms or even trigger an attack.
>
> Second: Feed only canned food. The higher water intake dilutes noxious
> substances in the urine. The higher water intake also results in more
> frequent urination which reduces bladder contact with urine.
>
> Third: A GAG supplement (Cosequin for Cats) to help maintain the GAG layer
> of the bladder.
>
> Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it reduces
> stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should only
> be used in cats that stress out easily.
>
>
> hth,
>
> Best of luck,
>
> Phil
>
>
>
>

Phil:

She gets only canned food, with added water and a Glucosamine
supplement. I also give her a methiodine (sp?) supplement when I think
an attack is imminent, she's gotten the stated dose for two days now.
She seems to have cleared up on her own this time.

The bloods came back with slightly elevated glucose levels ("stress
induced raised glucose" is what the vet said; some slight signs of liver
damage, and no signs of infection. It was suggested I approve a test
for hyperthyroid, which I have done.

Vet has also suggested some sort of anti-stress drug (something -calm,
dunno active ingredient) which I'm considering, since we've friends over
next week then start getting ready to move back to the US.

My poor, stressy cat. I wish I could just tell her "chill out dude"!

jmc

jmc
March 16th 08, 11:32 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):

> Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it reduces
> stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should only
> be used in cats that stress out easily.
>
>
> hth,
>
> Best of luck,
>
> Phil
>

Phil:

We put Meep on Clomicalm - 5mg clomipramine hydrochloride 1/day. Not
sure if it's the right medicine for her or not, especially since a
possible side effect is urinary retention and says to use with caution
with pets with known predisposition to develop urinary tract obstruction
- something I would think would be really bad for a cat with cystitis.

So far, all it has done is make her quite lethargic, and not quite
herself, but I understand that this is supposed to be transient as she
gets used to the medication. Any idea how long that takes?

Do you think I should go back to the vet and see about getting her on
amitriptyline instead?

jmc

Phil P.
March 16th 08, 11:56 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):
>
> > Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it
reduces
> > stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should
only
> > be used in cats that stress out easily.
> >
> >
> > hth,
> >
> > Best of luck,
> >
> > Phil
> >
>
> Phil:
>
> We put Meep on Clomicalm - 5mg clomipramine hydrochloride 1/day. Not
> sure if it's the right medicine for her or not, especially since a
> possible side effect is urinary retention and says to use with caution
> with pets with known predisposition to develop urinary tract obstruction
> - something I would think would be really bad for a cat with cystitis.
>
> So far, all it has done is make her quite lethargic, and not quite
> herself, but I understand that this is supposed to be transient as she
> gets used to the medication. Any idea how long that takes?
>
> Do you think I should go back to the vet and see about getting her on
> amitriptyline instead?

Why did your vet choose clomipramine over amitriptyline? I would ask him if
I were you. Clomipramine is used more in cats with inappropriate urination
problems. Although they're the same class of drugs, I think amitriptyline
produces fewer and milder side effects. Also, amitriptyline also has some
analgesic properties which is beneficial for cats with cystitis.

Phil

jmc
March 17th 08, 11:21 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/17/2008 9:26 AM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):
>>
>>> Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it
> reduces
>>> stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should
> only
>>> be used in cats that stress out easily.
>>>
>>>
>>> hth,
>>>
>>> Best of luck,
>>>
>>> Phil
>>>
>> Phil:
>>
>> We put Meep on Clomicalm - 5mg clomipramine hydrochloride 1/day. Not
>> sure if it's the right medicine for her or not, especially since a
>> possible side effect is urinary retention and says to use with caution
>> with pets with known predisposition to develop urinary tract obstruction
>> - something I would think would be really bad for a cat with cystitis.
>>
>> So far, all it has done is make her quite lethargic, and not quite
>> herself, but I understand that this is supposed to be transient as she
>> gets used to the medication. Any idea how long that takes?
>>
>> Do you think I should go back to the vet and see about getting her on
>> amitriptyline instead?
>
> Why did your vet choose clomipramine over amitriptyline? I would ask him if
> I were you. Clomipramine is used more in cats with inappropriate urination
> problems. Although they're the same class of drugs, I think amitriptyline
> produces fewer and milder side effects. Also, amitriptyline also has some
> analgesic properties which is beneficial for cats with cystitis.
>
> Phil
>
>
>

I'll ask, but from other Australian websites, I'm guessing it's "just
what they use" here (it's possible amitriptyline isn't available). I'll
ask for another reason too: The clomi-calm is sedating her so severely,
she's not even getting up to eat or use the litterbox at night - I
understand this is transient, but since she's already skinny (for the
first time in her life), I'm concerned about this. Fortunately, if I
put food right in front of her, she does eat :)

jmc

jmc

Phil P.
March 17th 08, 12:24 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/17/2008 9:26 AM):
> > "jmc" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):
> >>
> >>> Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it
> > reduces
> >>> stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should
> > only
> >>> be used in cats that stress out easily.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> hth,
> >>>
> >>> Best of luck,
> >>>
> >>> Phil
> >>>
> >> Phil:
> >>
> >> We put Meep on Clomicalm - 5mg clomipramine hydrochloride 1/day. Not
> >> sure if it's the right medicine for her or not, especially since a
> >> possible side effect is urinary retention and says to use with caution
> >> with pets with known predisposition to develop urinary tract
obstruction
> >> - something I would think would be really bad for a cat with cystitis.
> >>
> >> So far, all it has done is make her quite lethargic, and not quite
> >> herself, but I understand that this is supposed to be transient as she
> >> gets used to the medication. Any idea how long that takes?
> >>
> >> Do you think I should go back to the vet and see about getting her on
> >> amitriptyline instead?
> >
> > Why did your vet choose clomipramine over amitriptyline? I would ask him
if
> > I were you. Clomipramine is used more in cats with inappropriate
urination
> > problems. Although they're the same class of drugs, I think
amitriptyline
> > produces fewer and milder side effects. Also, amitriptyline also has
some
> > analgesic properties which is beneficial for cats with cystitis.
> >
> > Phil
> >
> >
> >
>
> I'll ask, but from other Australian websites, I'm guessing it's "just
> what they use" here (it's possible amitriptyline isn't available). I'll
> ask for another reason too: The clomi-calm is sedating her so severely,
> she's not even getting up to eat or use the litterbox at night - I
> understand this is transient,

That's one of the side effects of that drug that I really don't like- its
much more severe than amitriptyline at therapeutic doses. "Transient" can
last a few days or a few weeks or longer. Seeing cats in that state really
disturbs me. You're vet was supposed to begin therapy at a low dose and
gradually work up to a therapeutic dose. That helps to lessen the side
effects but most importantly, gives her heart a chance to gradually adapt to
the increases in heart rate instead of all at once.


but since she's already skinny (for the
> first time in her life), I'm concerned about this. Fortunately, if I
> put food right in front of her, she does eat :)

Reduced appetite is another side effect of clomipramine- greater than
amitriptyline.

Not my first choice!

Phil

jmc
March 18th 08, 01:28 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/17/2008 9:54 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/17/2008 9:26 AM):
>>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):
>>>>
>>>>> Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it
>>> reduces
>>>>> stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline should
>>> only
>>>>> be used in cats that stress out easily.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> hth,
>>>>>
>>>>> Best of luck,
>>>>>
>>>>> Phil
>>>>>
>>>> Phil:
>>>>
>>>> We put Meep on Clomicalm - 5mg clomipramine hydrochloride 1/day. Not
>>>> sure if it's the right medicine for her or not, especially since a
>>>> possible side effect is urinary retention and says to use with caution
>>>> with pets with known predisposition to develop urinary tract
> obstruction
>>>> - something I would think would be really bad for a cat with cystitis.
>>>>
>>>> So far, all it has done is make her quite lethargic, and not quite
>>>> herself, but I understand that this is supposed to be transient as she
>>>> gets used to the medication. Any idea how long that takes?
>>>>
>>>> Do you think I should go back to the vet and see about getting her on
>>>> amitriptyline instead?
>>> Why did your vet choose clomipramine over amitriptyline? I would ask him
> if
>>> I were you. Clomipramine is used more in cats with inappropriate
> urination
>>> problems. Although they're the same class of drugs, I think
> amitriptyline
>>> produces fewer and milder side effects. Also, amitriptyline also has
> some
>>> analgesic properties which is beneficial for cats with cystitis.
>>>
>>> Phil
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> I'll ask, but from other Australian websites, I'm guessing it's "just
>> what they use" here (it's possible amitriptyline isn't available). I'll
>> ask for another reason too: The clomi-calm is sedating her so severely,
>> she's not even getting up to eat or use the litterbox at night - I
>> understand this is transient,
>
> That's one of the side effects of that drug that I really don't like- its
> much more severe than amitriptyline at therapeutic doses. "Transient" can
> last a few days or a few weeks or longer. Seeing cats in that state really
> disturbs me. You're vet was supposed to begin therapy at a low dose and
> gradually work up to a therapeutic dose. That helps to lessen the side
> effects but most importantly, gives her heart a chance to gradually adapt to
> the increases in heart rate instead of all at once.
>
>
> but since she's already skinny (for the
>> first time in her life), I'm concerned about this. Fortunately, if I
>> put food right in front of her, she does eat :)
>
> Reduced appetite is another side effect of clomipramine- greater than
> amitriptyline.
>
> Not my first choice!
>
> Phil
>
>

Phil, talked to the vet. Apparently they just don't use amitriptyline
much here. However, the vet agreed that the clomicalm was sedating Meep
too much, and though she's not convinced the amitriptyline will be
better, she agrees that we needed to take Meep off the clomicalm. I
think it's causing urinary retention, as she hasn't peed in about a day
and a half - if she hasn't gone by the time I get up tomorrow, I'll be
calling the vet, because her bladder feels full now, and she drank a lot
tonight.

They don't keep the drug in stock anymore, so she has to special order
it for me. Hopefully we'll have some by Friday, and hopefully it won't
turn her into a zombie like the clomicalm has.

I feel really bad I've done this to her, though with the best
intentions. She did not get anything tonight, so hopefully she'll be
feeling more herself by tomorrow.

jmc

Phil P.
March 19th 08, 03:07 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/17/2008 9:54 PM):
> > "jmc" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/17/2008 9:26 AM):
> >>> "jmc" > wrote in message
> >>> ...
> >>>> Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (3/12/2008 5:55 PM):
> >>>>
> >>>>> Fourth: Amitriptyline- a tricyclic antidepressant drug because it
> >>> reduces
> >>>>> stress and also has analgesic properties. I think amitriptyline
should
> >>> only
> >>>>> be used in cats that stress out easily.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> hth,
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Best of luck,
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Phil
> >>>>>
> >>>> Phil:
> >>>>
> >>>> We put Meep on Clomicalm - 5mg clomipramine hydrochloride 1/day. Not
> >>>> sure if it's the right medicine for her or not, especially since a
> >>>> possible side effect is urinary retention and says to use with
caution
> >>>> with pets with known predisposition to develop urinary tract
> > obstruction
> >>>> - something I would think would be really bad for a cat with
cystitis.
> >>>>
> >>>> So far, all it has done is make her quite lethargic, and not quite
> >>>> herself, but I understand that this is supposed to be transient as
she
> >>>> gets used to the medication. Any idea how long that takes?
> >>>>
> >>>> Do you think I should go back to the vet and see about getting her on
> >>>> amitriptyline instead?
> >>> Why did your vet choose clomipramine over amitriptyline? I would ask
him
> > if
> >>> I were you. Clomipramine is used more in cats with inappropriate
> > urination
> >>> problems. Although they're the same class of drugs, I think
> > amitriptyline
> >>> produces fewer and milder side effects. Also, amitriptyline also has
> > some
> >>> analgesic properties which is beneficial for cats with cystitis.
> >>>
> >>> Phil
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >> I'll ask, but from other Australian websites, I'm guessing it's "just
> >> what they use" here (it's possible amitriptyline isn't available).
I'll
> >> ask for another reason too: The clomi-calm is sedating her so
severely,
> >> she's not even getting up to eat or use the litterbox at night - I
> >> understand this is transient,
> >
> > That's one of the side effects of that drug that I really don't like-
its
> > much more severe than amitriptyline at therapeutic doses. "Transient"
can
> > last a few days or a few weeks or longer. Seeing cats in that state
really
> > disturbs me. You're vet was supposed to begin therapy at a low dose and
> > gradually work up to a therapeutic dose. That helps to lessen the side
> > effects but most importantly, gives her heart a chance to gradually
adapt to
> > the increases in heart rate instead of all at once.
> >
> >
> > but since she's already skinny (for the
> >> first time in her life), I'm concerned about this. Fortunately, if I
> >> put food right in front of her, she does eat :)
> >
> > Reduced appetite is another side effect of clomipramine- greater than
> > amitriptyline.
> >
> > Not my first choice!
> >
> > Phil
> >
> >
>
> Phil, talked to the vet. Apparently they just don't use amitriptyline
> much here. However, the vet agreed that the clomicalm was sedating Meep
> too much, and though she's not convinced the amitriptyline will be
> better, she agrees that we needed to take Meep off the clomicalm. I
> think it's causing urinary retention, as she hasn't peed in about a day
> and a half - if she hasn't gone by the time I get up tomorrow, I'll be
> calling the vet, because her bladder feels full now, and she drank a lot
> tonight.
>
> They don't keep the drug in stock anymore, so she has to special order
> it for me. Hopefully we'll have some by Friday, and hopefully it won't
> turn her into a zombie like the clomicalm has.
>
> I feel really bad I've done this to her, though with the best
> intentions. She did not get anything tonight, so hopefully she'll be
> feeling more herself by tomorrow.

Be sure to remind your vet that amitriptyline has two dosing protocols- one
for behavior modification and one for idiopathic cystitis. The dose for
cystitis is about half the dose of behavior modification therapy. Since she
started Meep at the maximum dose of clomipramine, I'm afraid she'll
prescribe the maximum dose of amitriptyline, too.

'Better buy an Exacto knife or scalpel w/ #11 blades- you'll probably have
to cut the 10 mg tablets in 1/4s to get the appropriate dose.

Good luck,

Phil