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inluvwith4cats
March 23rd 08, 04:03 PM
Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night that
she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
whole time.

We don't really notice if she has been eating or drinking water before this
but I have been lifting the water bowl up for her so she can have water as
with the food bowl.

Her neck looks a little swollen but we can rub it and she doesnt meow in pain
or try to pull away. She has been drinking a lot but didn't go to the
bathroom very much. She has also been sleeping a lot. My boyfriend thinks its
a neck problem and I think its kidney desease but like I said we just noticed
it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.

blkcatgal
March 23rd 08, 04:24 PM
Please take your kitty to the vet as soon as possible and have her examined.
It could be kidney disease, especially if she is drinking more than usual.

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"inluvwith4cats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
> that
> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
> whole time.
>
> We don't really notice if she has been eating or drinking water before
> this
> but I have been lifting the water bowl up for her so she can have water as
> with the food bowl.
>
> Her neck looks a little swollen but we can rub it and she doesnt meow in
> pain
> or try to pull away. She has been drinking a lot but didn't go to the
> bathroom very much. She has also been sleeping a lot. My boyfriend thinks
> its
> a neck problem and I think its kidney desease but like I said we just
> noticed
> it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.
>

cshenk
March 23rd 08, 05:05 PM
"inluvwith4cats" wrote

> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
> that
> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
> whole time.

Any sudden change in a 14 year old cat, is a danger sign.

> We don't really notice if she has been eating or drinking water before
> this
> but I have been lifting the water bowl up for her so she can have water as
> with the food bowl.

As in this just started and you are just now doing it right?

> Her neck looks a little swollen but we can rub it and she doesnt meow in
> pain
> or try to pull away. She has been drinking a lot but didn't go to the
> bathroom very much. She has also been sleeping a lot. My boyfriend thinks
> its
> a neck problem and I think its kidney desease but like I said we just
> noticed
> it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.

Please have her checked as soon as possible but before panic, do you have
other pets? She might have just been played with a little rough (neck
swollen). She might also have been bitten mildly in play and have an
infection (should feel a slight lump which may be a little squishy, do NOT
wait! Hie thee to a vet!).

Had this happen once, 2 cats playing. One got poked by a claw (really was
an accident) and an abcess developed. Needed immedate surgery to open it
then antibiotics for a bit. Time was essential but fortunately, not a very
expensive trip that time <g>.

inluvwith4cats
March 23rd 08, 05:44 PM
i will but it being Easter the vets aren't really open. we plan on calling
them tomorrow though. thank you

cindys wrote:
>> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
>> that
>> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
>> whole time.
>-------
>This is an emergency situation. You need to take her to be seen by a vet
>ASAP.
>Best regards,
>---Cindy S.
>
>> We don't really notice if she has been eating or drinking water before
>> this
>[quoted text clipped - 9 lines]
>> noticed
>> it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.

inluvwith4cats
March 23rd 08, 05:46 PM
we plan on taking her tomorrow since it being easter our vet isn't open.

blkcatgal wrote:
>Please take your kitty to the vet as soon as possible and have her examined.
>It could be kidney disease, especially if she is drinking more than usual.
>
>S.
>> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
>> that
>[quoted text clipped - 14 lines]
>> noticed
>> it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.

inluvwith4cats
March 23rd 08, 05:51 PM
She's a skinny cat by nature so we notice our bigger cats eating more than
her all the time. But yes, I just started holding the bowl and food up last
night since thats when we noticed her having the neck problems. She was ok up
til last night.

We have 3 other cats.Can't really say it they were playing or not since the
family was out all day and just noticed it when we got home. We do plan on
taking her to the vets tomorrow since it is Easter and are probably closed.

cshenk wrote:
>> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
>> that
>> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
>> whole time.
>
>Any sudden change in a 14 year old cat, is a danger sign.
>
>> We don't really notice if she has been eating or drinking water before
>> this
>> but I have been lifting the water bowl up for her so she can have water as
>> with the food bowl.
>
>As in this just started and you are just now doing it right?
>
>> Her neck looks a little swollen but we can rub it and she doesnt meow in
>> pain
>[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
>> noticed
>> it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.
>
>Please have her checked as soon as possible but before panic, do you have
>other pets? She might have just been played with a little rough (neck
>swollen). She might also have been bitten mildly in play and have an
>infection (should feel a slight lump which may be a little squishy, do NOT
>wait! Hie thee to a vet!).
>
>Had this happen once, 2 cats playing. One got poked by a claw (really was
>an accident) and an abcess developed. Needed immedate surgery to open it
>then antibiotics for a bit. Time was essential but fortunately, not a very
>expensive trip that time <g>.

cybercat
March 23rd 08, 06:20 PM
"inluvwith4cats" <[email protected]> wrote:


> We do plan on
> taking her to the vets tomorrow since it is Easter and are probably
> closed.
>

Let us know what the vet says. This sounds serious to me.

Phil P.
March 23rd 08, 06:35 PM
"inluvwith4cats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
that
> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
> whole time.

Could be cervical ventroflexion which is often a result of potassium
depletion and can occur as a result chronic renal failure. When you see your
vet tomorrow, ask him to run a full blood workup (complete blood count &
serum chemistry) and urinalysis. If her serum potassium level is in the
lower half of the normal range ask him to prescribe a potassium supplement.
Even if she's not in renal failure, the potassium supplement will help delay
the onset.

Best of luck,

Phil

blkcatgal
March 23rd 08, 08:09 PM
Good idea....good luck. Let us know how it goes.

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"inluvwith4cats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> we plan on taking her tomorrow since it being easter our vet isn't open.
>
> blkcatgal wrote:
>>Please take your kitty to the vet as soon as possible and have her
>>examined.
>>It could be kidney disease, especially if she is drinking more than usual.
>>
>>S.
>>> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
>>> that
>>[quoted text clipped - 14 lines]
>>> noticed
>>> it last night so hopefully if its something it is a neck problem.
>

cshenk
March 23rd 08, 08:21 PM
"inluvwith4cats" wrote

> She's a skinny cat by nature so we notice our bigger cats eating more than
> her all the time. But yes, I just started holding the bowl and food up
> last
> night since thats when we noticed her having the neck problems. She was ok
> up
> til last night.

Ok, not long term then. Kidney problems from my experience, arent so very
fast (at that age, cant rule them out but the sudden dropping head isnt
something I've heard with that).

> We have 3 other cats.Can't really say it they were playing or not since
> the
> family was out all day and just noticed it when we got home. We do plan on
> taking her to the vets tomorrow since it is Easter and are probably
> closed.

Call and ask? They may want you to take her to emergency room. Definately
do not wait past tomorrow morning if she's still walking around head down.

How's she doing now? If it's an abcess, it might be where you cant feel it
unless trained. Can get very bad really fast. If she's still peeing
though, it's doubtful seeming to be a urinary tract blockage to me. (if she
stops, emergency clinic now!)

If her condition seems the same now as yesterday, just a bit droopier, I'm
guessing an infection of some sort, possibly abcess. Probably accidental
play caused if so and those can happen at any age.

Dont start kneeding her neck looking for it. It could bust inwards that way
and be bad news. (gently checking is ok, feel a lump and you got the cause.
Painful but not all pets react to pain like you or I would).

cshenk
March 23rd 08, 08:23 PM
"Phil P." wrote

>> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
> that
>> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
>> whole time.
>
> Could be cervical ventroflexion which is often a result of potassium
> depletion and can occur as a result chronic renal failure. When you see
> your
> vet tomorrow, ask him to run a full blood workup (complete blood count &
> serum chemistry) and urinalysis. If her serum potassium level is in the
> lower half of the normal range ask him to prescribe a potassium
> supplement.
> Even if she's not in renal failure, the potassium supplement will help
> delay
> the onset.

THats the other possible, but my one experience with this was a slower
onset. I'm hoping I'm right and she gets to the vet in time and it's a
simpler situation.

Nancy
March 24th 08, 09:37 PM
cshenk wrote:
> "Phil P." wrote
>
>>> Hi everyone! I have a cat that is 14 years old and we noticed last night
>> that
>>> she walking funny and her head was hanging down looking at the floor the
>>> whole time.
>> Could be cervical ventroflexion which is often a result of potassium
>> depletion and can occur as a result chronic renal failure. When you see
>> your
>> vet tomorrow, ask him to run a full blood workup (complete blood count &
>> serum chemistry) and urinalysis. If her serum potassium level is in the
>> lower half of the normal range ask him to prescribe a potassium
>> supplement.
>> Even if she's not in renal failure, the potassium supplement will help
>> delay
>> the onset.
>
> THats the other possible, but my one experience with this was a slower
> onset. I'm hoping I'm right and she gets to the vet in time and it's a
> simpler situation.

We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.

Nancy

cybercat
March 24th 08, 10:34 PM
"Nancy" > wrote
> We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
> deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
>

This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?

blkcatgal
March 24th 08, 10:45 PM
The main way that I know about is renal insufficiency. I don't know if
there are other reasons why a cat can suffer from potassium deficiency.

S.

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Nancy" > wrote
>> We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
>> deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
>>
>
> This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?
>

cshenk
March 24th 08, 11:46 PM
"blkcatgal" > wrote in message
. ..
> The main way that I know about is renal insufficiency. I don't know if
> there are other reasons why a cat can suffer from potassium deficiency.

Same here on knowledge base. Probably are other things but I don't know
what they are.

I wish our lady with the sick cat would update us on how it's gone!

cybercat
March 24th 08, 11:57 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
>
> "blkcatgal" > wrote in message
> . ..
>> The main way that I know about is renal insufficiency. I don't know if
>> there are other reasons why a cat can suffer from potassium deficiency.
>
> Same here on knowledge base. Probably are other things but I don't know
> what they are.
>
> I wish our lady with the sick cat would update us on how it's gone!
>

Me too.

Phil P.
March 25th 08, 04:41 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Nancy" > wrote
> > We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
> > deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
> >
>
> This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?



CRF is probably the most common cause of potassium depletion and hypokalemia
in cats- and its a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle.

Rapid urine formation- from any cause (CRF, diabetes, hyperthyroidism,
diuretics, sub-q fluids)- is another.

Acidified diets that don't contain enough potassium.

Severe/chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea.

Adrenal tumors.

Potassium depletion and hypokalemia aren't exactly the same. Serum
potassium levels aren't a good indicator of total body stores of potassium
because most (>95%) of the body stores of potassium are contained in tissue-
not in the blood. Ergo- a cat with normal serum potassium levels can have a
deficit in her total body stores of potassium which can lead to declining
renal function---> which leads to further potassium losses--> which leads to
a further decline in renal function and the cycle goes on and on.

Signs of mild or subclinical hypokalemia are often dismissed as signs of
aging- like reduced appetite, reduced activity, subtle weight loss, poor
coat. If your cats are over 7 or 8, a potassium supplement will probably
make them feel a lot better and would probably delay the onset of CRF. All
my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly recommend
them for all middle-age and older cats.

Phil

-mhd
March 25th 08, 05:32 AM
"Phil P." > wrote:

>. All
>my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly recommend
>them for all middle-age and older cats.

Hi Phil, what form do those supplements come in and what dosage do you
give daily?

-mhd

cybercat
March 25th 08, 05:44 AM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Nancy" > wrote
>> > We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
>> > deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
>> >
>>
>> This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?
>
>
>
> CRF is probably the most common cause of potassium depletion and
> hypokalemia
> in cats- and its a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle.
>
> Rapid urine formation- from any cause (CRF, diabetes, hyperthyroidism,
> diuretics, sub-q fluids)- is another.
>
> Acidified diets that don't contain enough potassium.
>
> Severe/chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea.
>
> Adrenal tumors.
>
> Potassium depletion and hypokalemia aren't exactly the same. Serum
> potassium levels aren't a good indicator of total body stores of potassium
> because most (>95%) of the body stores of potassium are contained in
> tissue-
> not in the blood. Ergo- a cat with normal serum potassium levels can have
> a
> deficit in her total body stores of potassium which can lead to declining
> renal function---> which leads to further potassium losses--> which leads
> to
> a further decline in renal function and the cycle goes on and on.
>
> Signs of mild or subclinical hypokalemia are often dismissed as signs of
> aging- like reduced appetite, reduced activity, subtle weight loss, poor
> coat. If your cats are over 7 or 8, a potassium supplement will probably
> make them feel a lot better and would probably delay the onset of CRF. All
> my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly recommend
> them for all middle-age and older cats.
>

Thanks, Phil, you are such a great resource.

CatNipped[_2_]
March 25th 08, 02:21 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Nancy" > wrote
>> > We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
>> > deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
>> >
>>
>> This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?
>
>
>
> CRF is probably the most common cause of potassium depletion and
> hypokalemia
> in cats- and its a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle.
>
> Rapid urine formation- from any cause (CRF, diabetes, hyperthyroidism,
> diuretics, sub-q fluids)- is another.
>
> Acidified diets that don't contain enough potassium.
>
> Severe/chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea.
>
> Adrenal tumors.
>
> Potassium depletion and hypokalemia aren't exactly the same. Serum
> potassium levels aren't a good indicator of total body stores of potassium
> because most (>95%) of the body stores of potassium are contained in
> tissue-
> not in the blood. Ergo- a cat with normal serum potassium levels can have
> a
> deficit in her total body stores of potassium which can lead to declining
> renal function---> which leads to further potassium losses--> which leads
> to
> a further decline in renal function and the cycle goes on and on.
>
> Signs of mild or subclinical hypokalemia are often dismissed as signs of
> aging- like reduced appetite, reduced activity, subtle weight loss, poor
> coat. If your cats are over 7 or 8, a potassium supplement will probably
> make them feel a lot better and would probably delay the onset of CRF. All
> my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly recommend
> them for all middle-age and older cats.
>
> Phil

Where do you get the potassium and omega 2 supplement? What brand? How
much to you give them? If I can't isolate the dose to just my 9 and 10 year
olds will it hurt to give it to them all (2 almost a year and one 4 year
old)? They're already getting 500mg/day/each of L-Lysine to prevent
outbreaks of FHV/Rhinovirus - do you think this would interfere with the
potassium and omega 3 supplements?

Hugs,

CatNipped

cshenk
March 25th 08, 08:20 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>> I wish our lady with the sick cat would update us on how it's gone!
>>
>
> Me too.

No news since. Thats usually bad news, sorry to say.

Phil P.
March 26th 08, 08:03 AM
"-mhd" > wrote in message
...
"Phil P." > wrote:

>>. All
>>my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly recommend
>>them for all middle-age and older cats.

>Hi Phil, what form do those supplements come in and what dosage do you
>give daily?

>-mhd

I use 3-V Free Form Liquid Omega-3s from DVM Pharmaceutical's now IVX Animal
Health. This is an improved version of 3-V Caps Liquid HP. The omega-3s are
in the, well, "free form" so it doesn't have to be broken down by pancreatic
enzymes to be absorbed. IOW, the Free Form Liquid has the highest
bioavailability of all the different types of omega-3s. The dose for cats
5-10 lbs is .5 ml (but I give all my cats a little more) which contains 160
mg of EPA and 104 mg of DHA-- high potency stuff and its balanced with
Vitamin E.

For the potassium supplement I use Tumil-K powder - 2mEq - which contains
468 mg of potassium gluconate (78 mg elemental potassium)- *Don't* use
potassium chloride or especially potassium citrate. Tumil-K comes in
caplets, powder and a gel.

These are the doses I give *my* cats Speak to your vet before giving your
cats any supplements.

Good luck,

Phil

Phil P.
March 26th 08, 08:04 AM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "cybercat" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >>
> >> "Nancy" > wrote
> >> > We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
> >> > deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
> >> >
> >>
> >> This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?
> >
> >
> >
> > CRF is probably the most common cause of potassium depletion and
> > hypokalemia
> > in cats- and its a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle.
> >
> > Rapid urine formation- from any cause (CRF, diabetes, hyperthyroidism,
> > diuretics, sub-q fluids)- is another.
> >
> > Acidified diets that don't contain enough potassium.
> >
> > Severe/chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea.
> >
> > Adrenal tumors.
> >
> > Potassium depletion and hypokalemia aren't exactly the same. Serum
> > potassium levels aren't a good indicator of total body stores of
potassium
> > because most (>95%) of the body stores of potassium are contained in
> > tissue-
> > not in the blood. Ergo- a cat with normal serum potassium levels can
have
> > a
> > deficit in her total body stores of potassium which can lead to
declining
> > renal function---> which leads to further potassium losses--> which
leads
> > to
> > a further decline in renal function and the cycle goes on and on.
> >
> > Signs of mild or subclinical hypokalemia are often dismissed as signs of
> > aging- like reduced appetite, reduced activity, subtle weight loss, poor
> > coat. If your cats are over 7 or 8, a potassium supplement will probably
> > make them feel a lot better and would probably delay the onset of CRF.
All
> > my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly
recommend
> > them for all middle-age and older cats.
> >
> > Phil
>
> Where do you get the potassium and omega 2 supplement? What brand? How
> much to you give them? If I can't isolate the dose to just my 9 and 10
year
> olds will it hurt to give it to them all (2 almost a year and one 4 year
> old)? They're already getting 500mg/day/each of L-Lysine to prevent
> outbreaks of FHV/Rhinovirus - do you think this would interfere with the
> potassium and omega 3 supplements?
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

All your cats would benefit from omega-3s, but I wouldn't give potassium
supplements to the younger cats. Potassium shouldn't interfere with
L-Lysine. Speak to your vet before giving your cats any supplements.

Phil

CatNipped[_2_]
March 26th 08, 02:16 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Phil P." > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> >
>> > "cybercat" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> >>
>> >> "Nancy" > wrote
>> >> > We had sudden onset of this in a 14 yr old cat. It was potassium
>> >> > deficiency, we supplemented him 2x a day and he lived 2 more years.
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> This is good to know! Do you know what causes potassium deficiency?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > CRF is probably the most common cause of potassium depletion and
>> > hypokalemia
>> > in cats- and its a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle.
>> >
>> > Rapid urine formation- from any cause (CRF, diabetes, hyperthyroidism,
>> > diuretics, sub-q fluids)- is another.
>> >
>> > Acidified diets that don't contain enough potassium.
>> >
>> > Severe/chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea.
>> >
>> > Adrenal tumors.
>> >
>> > Potassium depletion and hypokalemia aren't exactly the same. Serum
>> > potassium levels aren't a good indicator of total body stores of
> potassium
>> > because most (>95%) of the body stores of potassium are contained in
>> > tissue-
>> > not in the blood. Ergo- a cat with normal serum potassium levels can
> have
>> > a
>> > deficit in her total body stores of potassium which can lead to
> declining
>> > renal function---> which leads to further potassium losses--> which
> leads
>> > to
>> > a further decline in renal function and the cycle goes on and on.
>> >
>> > Signs of mild or subclinical hypokalemia are often dismissed as signs
>> > of
>> > aging- like reduced appetite, reduced activity, subtle weight loss,
>> > poor
>> > coat. If your cats are over 7 or 8, a potassium supplement will
>> > probably
>> > make them feel a lot better and would probably delay the onset of CRF.
> All
>> > my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly
> recommend
>> > them for all middle-age and older cats.
>> >
>> > Phil
>>
>> Where do you get the potassium and omega 2 supplement? What brand? How
>> much to you give them? If I can't isolate the dose to just my 9 and 10
> year
>> olds will it hurt to give it to them all (2 almost a year and one 4 year
>> old)? They're already getting 500mg/day/each of L-Lysine to prevent
>> outbreaks of FHV/Rhinovirus - do you think this would interfere with the
>> potassium and omega 3 supplements?
>>
>> Hugs,
>>
>> CatNipped
>
> All your cats would benefit from omega-3s, but I wouldn't give potassium
> supplements to the younger cats. Potassium shouldn't interfere with
> L-Lysine. Speak to your vet before giving your cats any supplements.
>
> Phil

Thanks, Phil, I will.

Hugs,

CatNipped

cybercat
March 26th 08, 04:29 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "cybercat" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>> I wish our lady with the sick cat would update us on how it's gone!
>>>>
>>>
>>> Me too.
>>
>> No news since. Thats usually bad news, sorry to say.
>>
> no that is typical what happens here about 1 out of a 100 come back and
> tell us what happened

That's true. I generally assume the worst--that they never took the cat to
the vet.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

-mhd
March 26th 08, 11:38 PM
"Phil P." > wrote:

>
>"-mhd" > wrote in message
>"Phil P." > wrote:
>
>>>. All
>>>my older cats get a potassium and omega 3 supplement. I highly recommend
>>>them for all middle-age and older cats.
>
>>Hi Phil, what form do those supplements come in and what dosage do you
>>give daily?
>
>>-mhd
>
>I use 3-V Free Form Liquid Omega-3s from DVM Pharmaceutical's now IVX Animal
>Health. This is an improved version of 3-V Caps Liquid HP. The omega-3s are
>in the, well, "free form" so it doesn't have to be broken down by pancreatic
>enzymes to be absorbed. IOW, the Free Form Liquid has the highest
>bioavailability of all the different types of omega-3s. The dose for cats
>5-10 lbs is .5 ml (but I give all my cats a little more) which contains 160
>mg of EPA and 104 mg of DHA-- high potency stuff and its balanced with
>Vitamin E.
>
>For the potassium supplement I use Tumil-K powder - 2mEq - which contains
>468 mg of potassium gluconate (78 mg elemental potassium)- *Don't* use
>potassium chloride or especially potassium citrate. Tumil-K comes in
>caplets, powder and a gel.
>
>These are the doses I give *my* cats Speak to your vet before giving your
>cats any supplements.
>
>Good luck,
>
>Phil
>

Thanks Phil and of course I would run any thing like that past my vet
first but I just want to file this away in my useful stuff to know
category.

Are these supplements palatable or could they turn the cat off its
food?

-mhd