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View Full Version : Re: Foreclosures slam doors on pets, too


Gregory Morrow[_3_]
March 26th 08, 05:44 AM
cyberrat wrote:

> Foreclosures slam doors on pets, too
> *http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/environment/2008-03-24-foreclosur....
> By Sharon L. Peters, Special for USA TODAY
> They're arriving by the thousands every month, homeless, hapless
> victims of foreclosure.
>
> Family pets, their lives upended by the ravaged finances of their
> owners, are landing in animal shelters in large numbers in some parts
> of the country.
>
> PET TALES: The truth about cats and dogs (or at least some interesting
> news!)
>
> The precise numbers are unknown, because there is no nationwide
> standard for recording foreclosure pets and because many owners who
> surrender animals at shelters tell personnel only that they are
> "moving" and give no specifics.


>
> But shelters that are experiencing an increase in pet intakes are
> almost without exception in areas where the foreclosure rate is high.
> Now there's growing concern that another, perhaps bigger wave of pet
> surrenders is in the offing, the result of the worsening economy and
> growing joblessness that will affect additional homeowners as well as
> renters.


Some people are too stupid to have pets, there should be a "means
test" to have pets, and that includes checking credit and
financials...

This should be done for prospective parents of humans, too...



> "The fate of people's pets tracks with their own financial fate," says
> the ASPCA's Steve Zawistowski. He adds that although some shelters
> have been largely unaffected, "there are pockets" where so many
> homeowners are losing their homes that the number of pets relinquished
> to shelters, turned loose or abandoned is increasing dramatically. The
> pockets probably will spread with a deteriorating economy, he says.
>
> The situation is sufficiently worrisome that the Humane Society of the
> United States (HSUS) just created a $15,000 seed-money fund (and is
> seeking public contributions to it) to help shelters and rescue groups
> accommodate in the short term their local surge in homeless pets.



Well, that's a start, for $15K you can buy a LOT of Zyklon B gas which
which to put Fluffy and Spot "down"...and why not put some of their
brain - dead owners "to sleep" while you are at it. It's called
"culling the herd", you get rid of the weak, the stupid, and the
irresponsible...




And
> many shelters in hard-hit areas are devising programs to respond.
> Among them:
>
> * The Sacramento SPCA, which took in 100 more dogs and cats for
> "moving" reasons (176) in the past four months of 2007 as in the same
> period in 2006, has developed an early-assistance program to help
> people find ways to keep their pets or make temporary-care
> arrangements before they reach the out-of-options stage, says director
> Rick Johnson.
>
> "We'll visit with the animals and we can meet with prospective
> landlords" when it appears, for example, that additional discussion
> might help a family keep the pet in new quarters.


Most landlords have a "NO DOGS" policy for a reason; dogs are FILTHY
animals, always ****ing and ****ting and barking everywhere. No
landlord in their right mind wants a dog on the
premises...


And, he says, the
> staff is willing to take whatever time it takes to discuss with owners
> the possibilities for keeping their animals.
>
> * The Pennsylvania SPCA is waiving for foreclosure victims the fees
> associated with its "good-home guarantee" program, which promises the
> shelter will keep the pet as long as it takes to find a new home.
> "With everything else they're going through, (people who foreclose)
> should not have to worry that their animal will be euthanized," CEO
> Howard Nelson says.


Uh, why not...??? These people made poor decisions and now want
someone else - and someone else's DIME - to "pick up the slack", so to
speak...



At least 10 families have taken advantage of the
> program in less than three months.
>
> The Pennsylvania program is addressing one of animal welfare experts'
> greatest concerns: that pet owners, worried that their animals will be
> euthanized at the shelter, are setting them loose or leaving them in
> empty houses and garages with some food and water. Often the abandoned
> animals aren't found for days or weeks and are dead or dying, they
> say. And ultimately the survivors wind up in a shelter anyway.
>


Oh, well, I guess some pets just chose the WRONG owners...happens with
people too...!!!


> As for the ones set free: Most house pets don't do well on their own
> and are often injured in fights with predators or other animals, hit
> by vehicles or infected with diseases, experts say.
>
> Though acknowledging that many pets left at shelters are eventually
> euthanized if they aren't adopted, "if the animal is put in a shelter,
> at least she will have a chance and won't endure all that suffering,"
> Zawistowski says.
>
> The SPCA of Erie County, N.Y., is experiencing only a bump -- about two
> a month -- in foreclosure pets, says executive director Barbara Carr.
> But each is heartbreaking. She tells of a man who arrived at the
> shelter this month saying he had to give up his cat and two small
> dogs. When an employee walked outside to help him get the animals into
> the shelter, "she discovered that he had arrived in a U-Haul loaded
> with boxes and furniture. He had lost his home and had no place to go.
> The very last thing he did was surrender his animals."



This moron should have spent some time reading the "fine print" in his
mortgage contract, in any case he's *way* too irresponsible to have
pets...



> All three now have new homes.
>
> HSUS and ASPCA have sent out advisories imploring people to plan for
> their animals in case their finances nosedive. Also, "we're trying to
> get the word out for people to take note of what's happening in the
> economy, understand that animals are expensive, and if you don't have
> much cushion, now may not be a good time to get a pet," says Stephanie
> Shain of HSUS.


DUH...


> Zawistowski hopes the question of foreclosure pets will prompt a
> national discussion. Hurricane Katrina resulted in a recognition that
> after natural disasters pets must be managed, "and we have, as a
> nation, set up systems to do so," he says. It's important to see that
> when people are displaced by economic disaster, "we also need to
> manage the pets and should establish systems for that."


"Manage" pets...??? It's not like pets are productive. Livestock is
productive to the economy and so is "managed", pets are not...



--
Best
Greg

Bill Bonde ( 'the oblique allusion in lieu of the frontal attack' )
March 27th 08, 05:53 AM
Gregory Morrow wrote:
>
> cyberrat wrote:
>


> > But shelters that are experiencing an increase in pet intakes are
> > almost without exception in areas where the foreclosure rate is high.
> > Now there's growing concern that another, perhaps bigger wave of pet
> > surrenders is in the offing, the result of the worsening economy and
> > growing joblessness that will affect additional homeowners as well as
> > renters.
>
> Some people are too stupid to have pets, there should be a "means
> test" to have pets,
>
If you are mean, no pets.



--
"Question, two men starving to death decide to eat their hair like
spaghetti. Is that funny?"
"Hmmm, well, it depends on if by funny you want to make people
laugh."
-+Eddie Izzard and Joanna Lumley, "The Cat's Meow"