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View Full Version : Re: New Puppy. Need Help. Separation anxiety.


MS
April 3rd 08, 04:34 PM
We don't want the dog to learn that she'll get her way by barking,
scratching, and banging on the door. She needs to learn to sit
patiently. I don't think I'm expecting a lot. My childhood dog just
played outside as long as we left her out. We have a plethora of toys
for our dog, both inside and out, and there are dogs on every side of
our backyard with whom she plays. She just can't stand to be away
from us.

Also, please argue somewhere else. I started this thread for the sake
of gaining knowledge, not for an internet version of the Jerry
Springer show for dog owners.

So get lost.

tiny dancer[_2_]
April 3rd 08, 05:02 PM
"MS" > wrote in message
...
> We don't want the dog to learn that she'll get her way by barking,
> scratching, and banging on the door. She needs to learn to sit
> patiently. I don't think I'm expecting a lot.

You're expecting a lot from a three month old puppy.




My childhood dog just
> played outside as long as we left her out.


All dogs are different, they aren't carbon copies of each other, clones.
Dogs aren't inanimate objects, always available when *you* want to interact
with them, but otherwise off somewhere, unabtrusive and waiting until you
decide you want to be with them.


We have a plethora of toys
> for our dog, both inside and out, and there are dogs on every side of
> our backyard with whom she plays. She just can't stand to be away
> from us.


Dogs are our companions. Of course they want to be where we are. If you
have exercised her, walked her, played with her, then let her come inside
with you. She wants to be with her *people*, and not off in the yard
somewhere alone. Once she understands she's part of your family/pack,
she'll find a spot inside to take a nap. I have one dog who enjoys sleeping
on the sofa downstairs during the day time, and one velcro dog, who will
always be found napping where ever it is I am in the house. She see's it as
her duty/job to take care of me. And I appreciate that. If someone comes
to the door, she is right there beside me, letting any strangers know that
she's here to protect me. It's a nice, comforting feeling. Give your girl
time. She'll work out her days eventually. Like I said, I have one who is
perfectly happy to do his own thing, and one who likes to be with me. Your
puppy isn't old enough, experienced enough, to have developed a routine yet.
Right now she wants and needs to be where you are. Some day you might
appreciate that.


td


>
> Also, please argue somewhere else. I started this thread for the sake
> of gaining knowledge, not for an internet version of the Jerry
> Springer show for dog owners.
>
> So get lost.

April 3rd 08, 06:09 PM
HOWEDY ms,

"MS" > wrote in message news:0d980b58-b30c-4f3f-
...
> We don't want the dog to learn that she'll get her way by barking,

That so? Barking is a SYMPTOM of anXXXIHOWESNESS.

DOGS DIE from EXXXCESSIVE BARKING, ms <{}: ~ ( >

You can EXXXTINGUISH anXXXIHOWESNESS barking
NEARLY INSTANTLY simply by PRAISING your doggy.

LIKE THIS:

Estel J. Hines" > wrote in message
...

Until i read the Jerry method of Bark
reduction, it went something like this
with our 11 month old puppy "Yoshi"

Yoshi: Bark, bark,

us: HUSH Youshi

Yoshi Bark, bark......................

us: Hush Youshi

Yoshi BARK, BARK, BARK, ..........

it stopped when Yoshi got tired barking

We decided to try the Jerry method:

Yoshi: BARK, BARK

US: GOOD Yoshi, Good Boy, who is it?

Yoshi Bark, Bark

US: It's ok, good boy Yoshi, We know them.

Yosh without fail, now stops after we say that.

I must say, it is so much more fun, when we
can praise him, to deal with things like this.

Thanks Jerry

ps: We are just starting to go thru the Jerry
Papers, and learn how to live with our son
"Yoshi", whom we love very much. --

Best Regards,
Estel J. Hines

-----------------

AND LIKE THIS:

"Brandy Kurtz" >
wrote in message
om...

Hello everyone! We have a 2 1/2 year old male

Well I just printed out the Amazing Puppy
Wizard info, so I haven't actually started
to train yet.

Today a salesman knocked on the door, and Pokey
was going balisstic. I calmly go to the window
to see who it is, and off-handly say Good Boy,
It's a stranger, Good Boy.

Pokey shut right up, gave me a quizical look,
and came and sat beside my feet!

OMG, I could not believe it!

I was totally floored, as this has been his
behavior since a pup. Just wanted to update,
and Pokey and I are hitting the sack...;)

Brandy

----------------------

AND LIKE THIS:

Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2003 9:06 AM
Hello.

I never posted here (or anywhere) before.
I never trained or owned a dog before this
year.

I downloaded the Wit's End, read it, corresponded
with Mr. Howe and trained my dog to come and to
stop barking in a weekend.

Our dog, Jake, had been treated with kindness the
whole time we had him, about 10 months, but his
earlier life is unknown.

I worked on the hot-cold exercise for about 30
minutes when he suddenly "got it". After that
he came to me every time with no hesitation.

I used the cans filled with pennies to teach him
not to bark. If he now starts to bark, I go to the
door or window, say "Good Boy, its' alright" and
he usually calms down right away.

A couple of times I had to get the cans
out again to reinforce the behavior.

We feel a strong bond with this animal
and he is very eager to accept our love.

So with all the vitriolic spewing going on,
I have to believe Mr. Howe is right.

His method worked for us.

I don't know if it would have been quite
as effective if we had tried another method first.

Florence

------------------

AND LIKE THIS:

From: "Marisa" >
Date: Fri, 17 May 2002

Subject: one day

I started some of the simple techniques in
Jerrys manual today.

The family pack exercise.... come command.....
that's all so far though.

I did get the proper equipment as well.
20 foot leash, cans with pennies partially
crushed, flat collar, etc.

I have also stopped any negative reinforcment
such as loud "No" and "Bad girl Sonique!"
(Sonique is my Jack russell) and holding her
back, which I normally MUST do or she'll jump
and nip sometimes, but always jumping and barking.

Already tonight some has started working.
When someone came to the door, Sonique
went nuts as usual.

I said "Thank you Sonique!"
"It's o.k. girl, thank you!"

And we got a total of about 6 barks and then
no jumping on guests, no biting, growling
or the worst, the continued barking she
normally does.

She accepted my praise, and trooted around,
still excited over guests, but she was WAY
more under control.

Even my roomates noticed this.

She repeated this same thing
without all her normal fuss later
when another two friends came over.

So I do need more time, going to keep with it
another day, another month whatever until I
know I am getting results, although I must say,
so far I am impressed with my dog.

She really responds to praise better than
she ever has responded to treats as distraction
from the guests and doorbell, or me yelling
"bad girl! go away now! shoosh up!" all the time.

I am also verbally praising her everytime
she makes eye contact with me. so hopefully
things will continue going well!-

- Marisa

--------------------

HOWEver, THAT AIN'T GOOD enough for the
pathetic miserable stinkin rotten lyin animal murderin
punk thug coward active accute chronic life long
incurable malignant maliciHOWES MENTAL
CASES you're askin for advice.

HERE'S HOWE COME:

From: " >
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2008 05:27:15 -0800 (PST)

Subject: In strong defense of Jerry Howe

Fellow dog people,

I was EXTREMELY put off by Jerry Howe's posts at
first, with all the name-calling and HOWES everywhere,
and yet he took the time to post long, detailed answers,
and if I scrolled past the angry verbiage, he sounded
intelligent, very caring and understanding about dogs,
and earnest in his desire to help in a constructive way.

He just felt so angry and frustrated that people were
using poor methods in their dog training, methods that
made the dog miserable, who then made his OWNER miserable.

Then, the misguided (though well-meaning) dog
owner/trainer would PASS ON the wrong info.

Finally I went to Jerry's online manual, and began
reading it carefully, and it made me feel a sense
of all my doggy problems blowing away in the wind,
using methods that are not cruel, or sugary, but
sensible, and not difficult or dangerous, or the
kind of thing that makes you feel horrible doing
them.

He suggested that a barking dog is trying to warn
his owner of an intruder,or of danger, and so
punishing the dog only confuses and upsets him.
"TEll him,"Good boy".

He said that it would stop the barking sooner. We
have a dachshund at home who barks a LOT, never at
nothing, but at people at the door and loud noises.

At my instigation, we PRAISED him when he barked,
and it was almost comical! He stopped immediately,
and his eyes were warm, and he was practically
GRINNING with pleasure!

We've been saying "good boy" for barking, and he's
barked MUCH less, and seems a much more content animal.

I'm gonna finish the manual, and use its methods for
ALL our dogs, and earnestly recommend that you do the
same!

It's FREE, and yet priceless!

Sincerely,

Cindy Yost

---------------

SEE? SEE?? SEE??? SEE???? SEE????? SEE??????

> scratching, and banging on the door.

That's an anXXXIHOWESNESS behavior, ms.

DOGS DIE from anXXXIHOWESNESS, ms <{}: ~ ( >

> She needs to learn to sit patiently.

No. *YOU* need to LEARN HOWE to pupperly
handle raise an train your dog, ms <{}: ~ ( >

> I don't think I'm expecting a lot.

Well then HOWE COME you ain't LEARNED HOWE, ms?

All you've done is COMPLAIN that someWON AIN'T BEIN FAIR to
you. You sound just like your little fearful abused doggy, ms <{}: ~
( >

> My childhood dog just played outside as long as we left her out.

Your childhood doggy was GLAD to be AWAY from you.

> We have a plethora of toys for our dog, both inside and out,
> and there are dogs on every side of our backyard with whom
> she plays. She just can't stand to be away from us.

Your dog is AFRAID of *your* RETURN, ms.

You're a dog abuser. AND A COWARD.

> Also, please argue somewhere else.

Oh? Where else would you think it's apupriate to
"argue" the SCIENCE of dog behavior, ms?

> I started this thread for the sake of gaining knowledge,

Yet you don't care enough to ASK for heelp, ms?

I GAVE YOU posted case histories of SUCCESSFUL dog
owners who HAD the same problem an resolved it NEARLY
INSTANTLY simply by DOIN EVERY THING EXXXACTLY
PRECISELY OPPOSITE of HOWE your newfHOWEND pathetic
miserable stinkin rotten lyin animal murderin child abusin PALS,
PREFER.

Yet you CHOSE to follow the ADVICE of the pathetic miserable
stinkin rotten lyin animal murderin punk thug coward active accute
chronic life long incurable malignant maliciHOWES MENTAL
CASES who DIDN'T HAVE nodoGdameneD ADVICE who's own
dogs GOT THE SAME PROBLEMS for the SAME REASON and
can't fix their own dogs.

> not for an internet version of the Jerry Springer show for dog owners.

Ahhh, so THAT;"S HOWE COME you didn't get the heelp you needed~!

You thought you was on the Jerry Springer show??

NAAAAH~!

*THIS* is The Steve Wilkos Show and YOU GOTTA STAND UP,
you pathetic dog an child abusin piece of crap. ABUSERS CAN'T
SIT on my stage. GO AHEAD, ABUSER, STAND UP an DEFEND
YOURSELF.

You want your DOG to be quiet? You don't LIKE it when your
puppy puts his MHOWETH on you? Go ahead, DOG ABUSER.

Do what you do to your dog to ME an see HOWE long you last.
GO AHEAD, ABUSER. Stop me from nippin on your hands.

GO AHEAD. Do what you done to your puppy to break her MHOWETHING to ME
an see what happens, you pathetic coward.

> So get lost.

GIT OFF MY STAGE you pathetic dog an child abusin coward <{}: ~ ( >

Thank you,
Steve Wilkos,


http://relinkz.com/Steve_Wilkos_Productions_Behavior_Manual

April 3rd 08, 08:35 PM
HOWEDY janet you pathetic miserable stinkin rotten
lyin animal murderin punk thug coward active accute
chronic life long incurable mental case and professional
dog trainin FRAUD an SCAM ARTIST,

"Janet Boss" > wrote in message
...
> In article
> >,
> MS > wrote:
>
>> I don't think I'm expecting a lot.

EXXXPECTING any successful ADVICE from these
pathetic miserable stinkin rotten lyin animal murderin
punk thug coward active accute chronic life long incurable
mental case and professional dog trainin FRAUDS an
SCAM ARTISTS is TOO MUCH <{}:~ ( >

>> My childhood dog just played outside as long as we left her out.

janet DON'T leave her dogs HOWEtside on accHOWENTA
they'll ESCAPE and BARK CONSTANTLY <{}:~ ( >

>> We have a plethora of toys for our dog, both inside and
>> out, and there are dogs on every side of our backyard with
>> whom she plays. She just can't stand to be away from us.

NO. The dog is AFRAID of his ABUSER'S RETURN.

> She's exhibiting totally normal puppy behavior.

INDEED? Throwing fits and hyperventilating is NORMAL?

YOUR OWN DOGS DO THAT, don't they, REMEMBER, janet?

THAT'S HOWE COME you couldn't "place" your "RESCUE"
dog Rudy in a FOREVER ADOPTED HOWES, despite showin
him to FIVE families, on accHOWENTA he's HYPERACTIVE <{}: ~ ( >

> Few dogs entertain themselves.

That's ABSURD, janet. Dogs enterTRAIN themselves
with LOTS of STUFF like chasin their tails, chasin
shadows, chewing holes in their skin, escapin their
crates, stealing garbage, swallowin socks and havin
seizures, like HOWE your dogs do <{}: ~ ) >.

Ooops~!

> And if you think she's "playing" with the dogs on other
> sides of fences, she's not. She's building frustration.

ms SEZ her dog is PLAYIN and describes her PLAYIN.

So, if it walks an barks like a doggy, it's PROBABLY a doggy <{}: ~ )
>

>> Also, please argue somewhere else. I started this thread for
>> the sake of gaining knowledge, not for an internet version of
>> the Jerry Springer show for dog owners.
>
> Then you need to stop using Google so you can use a
> filter and filter Jerry Howe. Things get sane and lovely.

Oh, you mean, LIKE THIS?:

"Loop the lead (it's basically a GIANT nylon or leather
choke collar) over his snarly little head, and give him a
stern correction" --Janet Boss
http://s181.photobucket.com/albums/x272/TheIncrediblySimplyAmazingPup...

"J1Boss" > wrote in message
...

He was next to me and I could see his neck
muscles pulsing. He didn't even blink an eye.
Janet Boss

"sionnach" > wrote in message
...

> "J1Boss" > wrote in message
> ...
> > I can't imagine needing anything higher
> > than a 5 with it, even with an insensitive
> > dog like a Lab.

An INSENSITIVE DOG???

> > I can't remember what model of Innotek I have, but
> > I had a pointer ignore a neck-muscle-pulsing 9.

Do you think the citronella collar is CRUEL
cause the SMELL LINGERS after the dog's
been sprayed in the face and the dog won't
know HOWE COME IT was MACED?

janet CONtinues:
> > My dogs are not human children wearing fur- they are DOGS.
> > I don't have anything against electronic bark collars, but they
> > should be used in conjunction with actually working at training
> > your dog(s).

They're DUMB ANIMALS these MENTALLY ILL LYING
DOG ABUSERS HURT INTIMIDATE and MURDER.

-------------------

LIKE THIS:

From: Janet Boss >
Date: Wed, 29 Aug 2007 12:39:43 -0400

Subject: Re: the one-dog two-dog dilemma
In article >,

Shelly > wrote:
> hat was a sing that I should be committed.

> I have a feeling that, as crazy as multiple retrievers might be, it
> pales in comparison to multiple Boxers. It's not a theory I'd
> personally care to test, though.

Me neither! Yes, we don't have the sock thing with Rudy
thank goodness. He keeps me just as worried with lumps
(cells from one are out for biopsy now), has been a poop
eater (past tense) and has his urinary issue.

Their "joie de vivre" is pretty similar though!

They're actually very good at being rugs
when in the house and it's just me/us.
--
Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

---------------------

From: J1Boss )
Subject: Re: housebreaking in a multi level home
Date: 2002-06-27 03:30:11 PST

> From: Rocky
> Nessa wrote in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:
>> why does Franklin have to be on a leash?
>
> I think that Franklin's been naughty.
>
>--
>--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.

and apparently pretty sneaky too -
can't figure this one out still!

FYI - He ingested a mystery sock.
Hadn't done that in well over a year.

When he was a puppy we were very lucky -
they went through or came up. We've done
"sock work" with him leaving them alone,
but mostly are pretty conscientious about
not making them available.

The risk is obviously too high. One of his
littermates beat him to the punch with the
same surgery, and his great grandfather had
this habit until he died at age 12.

My MIL was visiting (sockless!) and since he
wasn't with me every waking moment as usual
as a result, I can only imagine that the sock
presented itself somehow while she was with him.

He was a very, very sick dog. He had emergency
surgery on Monday, but was home by Tuesday - we
lucked out that the sock had advanced enough that
they didn't need to cut the bowel.

Once he was opened, they were able to manipulate
the sock out his rectum. He thinks he's fine, so
the leash is very necessary! He's got about a foot
of staples on his tummy, and this was a very
expensive sock!

Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

--------------------------------

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAAA~!~!~!

FRANKLIN and JANET, ACT II

From: J1Boss )
Subject: Re: What can I do if I can't afford a behaviorist?

Date: 2002-06-27 05:20:30 PST

> From: diddy
> Some dogs are really adept at getting
> out of things, even the impossible.

Yes indeed. I crated Franklin when I had to
leave yesterday. He's post surgical and needs
to be confined and rest/kept safe.

He is used to crates, has not problem with
them and does not "escape" (mesh crates, wire
crates, etc - he takes them all in stride,
whether strange places or at home).

When I got home, both dogs greeted me at the
door. He had managed to bend the clips on the
end panel of his metal crate (General Cage 204)
and squeeze out the top/side of the end panel
that has the door. The door was securely closed.

THAT was NOT a good thing to do with a foot of
staples in your tummy. He hadn't done it before -
but he's not his usual self obviously.

We won't be trying that again any time soon!

Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

---------------------

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAA~!~!~!

Subject: The crate escape - my brilliant puppy!

1 From: Janet B
Date: Wed, Apr 5 2006 7:44 am
Email: Janet B

After Rudy came to stay with us, I got tired of running
into an open crate door, so I bought a new crate, with a
door that folds up and in. "can't be opened from the inside"
says the ad. I always looked at these and hought "right",
but for the last few months (yes, folks, it's been 3.5 months)
it has worked great.

Until Monday.

That's when Mr Smarty-pants decided he knew how
to open it. And greeted us at the door after 6+ hours
of freedom.

A chewed wastebasket lid and a puddle inside the
front door (he loses it if very excited and yesterday
morning I found evidence that a smallish dog had
apparently "visited" right outside my full view front
door) was all that was wrong.

So yesterday, when I left for a short errand, I made
sure to clip the door closed securely. And once again
came home to an unconfined puppy.

So, today, the crate will get clips on the door to ensure
this doesn't happen again. I need him to learn that he
shouldn't let himself out.

But it looks like he's going to be allowed house freedom
within a few days, and since he'll be 9 months old on
Monday, that'll be the day.

I'll take the next few days to put some shoes away and
check out other things he may be interested in, and get
out the bitter apple.

My house is not exactly the neatest place in the world,
and there's a lot of stuff that may be too available and
interesting. We shall see.

My puppy is growing up and too smart for his own good!
--
Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAA~!~!~!

From: Janet B >
Date: Tue, 09 May 2006 15:23:53 -0400

Subject: urinary leaking

Rudy has a vet appointment tomorrow afternoon,
but I thought I'd throw this out here anyway.

Rudy has excitement urination sometimes - if I spend too long before
coming into the house, he may flood his crate. This is generally only
if I've been gone over 4 hours. He does not have water in his crate.

Rudy sleeps through the night (10-6 or 7) and never has an issue with
leaking then. He is housebroken and waits until I let him out.

A few times over the last month, after I've been gone a bit over 5
hours, I've come home, let him out where he pees up a storm, then he
is fed, out again, maybe multiple times (for play, etc) and eliminates
normally. Then he naps. When he's sleeping, he leaks.

Baseball-Softball sized puddle generally. Yesterday, I as home with
him all day, gone for <2 hours in the early evening, and late in the
evening, right before bed, he leaked again while sleeping.

This doesn't strike me as an infection or even a sphincter issue, but
it has me puzzled. He has no idea he's doing it and it doesn't wake
him.

Any thoughts?
--
Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

-------------------------

Here's a other of janet's REAL LIFE IN PERSON "students":

Subject: First Class was tonite

1 From: Nessa
Date: Tues, Jun 11 2002 8:32 pm
Email: Nessa >

Tonite I started Janet's obedience class. It's
like NIGHT and DAY from the class Bagel 'flunked'.
I was amazed at the difference and I am very glad
Janet gave me the chance to attend her class.

I can't wait till PK on Saturday.

Nessa

------------------

Subject: Training...

1 From: Nessa
Date: Wed, Jun 12 2002 9:45 pm
Email: Nessa >

well both my kids are asleep one on my left and
one on my right. Bagel has taken to running away
every chance he gets now so I have to be ever vigilant.

I have tried every type of collar around. Flat Buckle,
nylon lobster claw slip collar, harness, gentle leader.

Yesterday I watched him on a prong collar.

I SWORE I would NEVER use a prong collar.
He willingly sits to have it put on (as opposed
to fighting me when I put on the gentle leader).

He is no longer pulling on the leash when we walk.

Currently he is doing his 30 minute quiet period
next to my chair with it on since he is leashed and
he is out like a light. So is Hannah.

I tried to find them a place to play off leash tonight
since Bagel has become a happy wanderer and I
couldn't find a safe place so they didn't get as much
play as any of us would like.

I am doing my training with Janet and I am so happy.
Bagel did his sit downs tonight without much fuss and
Hannah watched from the crate. Then we let Hannah
do about 5 minutes of sit and down.

She's getting good at them.

I have been rewarding with treats and tonite I didn't
and they still did what I told them to do. with Bagel
on my left with his head facing front and Hannah on
my right with her head facing back I feel like I have
the most beautiful bookends in the world.

Life with a dog..... PRICELESS

Nessa
--
I don't have issues
I have subscriptions
www.nessa.info

---------------

From: Nessa
Date: Thurs, Jul 4 2002 8:22 am
Email: Nessa >

On Thu, 4 Jul 2002 0:08:02 -0400, Jenn wrote
(in message >):

> That aside, I crate trained both my dogs
> successfully, and used the crate to house
> train them.

Bagel is so well crate trained that in the mornings when
I make his Kong, he runs to the crate and since I am not
crating him anymore (just confining him) but I am crating
Hannah, I have to pull him out of the crate and he does not
want to get out.

BTW housebreaking with Janet is going quite well.

Nessa

----------------

Subject: I went away for the weekend... big mistake

1 From: Nessa -
Date: Sun, Jul 21 2002 9:58 pm
Email: Nessa >

I went away for the weekend and I think my
dog walker will never speak to me again.

Bagel escaped from the kitchen and ate about 10
pounds of puppy food and proceeded to deposit it
all over my house.

He esp. liked my living room sofa which was my
mothers as he pulled some cushions off of it and
literally stood on it and peed.

Yes I know my dog has issues and I know I need help.

I think my poor dog walker needs therapy now.

It was a rough dog weekend for her and not
just with my kids.

I didn't know until the last minute I was going
away and NEXT time, the furbabies will go to
furbaby camp for the weekend.

It was too much for them.

Well live and learn.

Meanwhile, I'm still glad I went on retreat.

My house will survive as things are not important.

Hannah still loves me and Bagel will talk
to me in a few days.....

Nessa

------------

From: Nessa )
Subject: Re: Where we stand/sit/down/leave it Now

Date: 2003-09-17 14:14:51 PST
On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 15:16:04 -0400,
Charlie Wilkes wrote (in message
>):

> Yes, it's a huge improvement over shoving them
> in crates at night. But why does Bagel have to
> be leashed?

because he will wander the area (room if i close
the door or house if i don't) and pee and bark all
night long. but i said that already you must not
be reading for comprehension.
--
Nessa

=========

Subject: Night time barking.. Help needed
1 From: Nessa
Date: Wed, Sep 18 2002 5:50 am
Email: Nessa >

Morning all,

Bagel and Hannah are doing well except for
night time barking in the house for play time.

Problem is it that when I am trying to sleep esp.
between 1 and 5. I CAN'T just let them bark it
out (because if I could it's no biggie and I can
sleep through it).

My problem is that my next door neighbors (I live in
a townhouse) don't appreciate it (and I can't blame them).

If they are very tired after a day at the park they tend
to sleep better but I can't get them to the park now
everyday because it gets dark earlier. I try to let them
run around a bit in the neighborhood with other dogs
but it's not enough.

oh that is when the owners and I are standing there.
we try to let them all play under supervision.

I can live with the banging (as Bagel slams Hannah
into the wall or Hannah throws one of her bones down
the uncarpeted steps and they waterfall down the steps
(there is no other way to describe dogs running down
wooden steps)

I know a tired dog is a good dog. I just don't know
what to do to hold off the barking. I know they are
playing and all I can think of is the line from the kids
book Go Dog Go (one of my favorites) is:

Now it is night
Sleep dogs sleep

(btw the drawing is of all these dogs sleeping in a big bed
on the pillows like humans with their party hats on)

I'm at the point where I am considering a soft muzzle to
prevent parking. Someone has offered the use of the
shock collar to teach no bark but I don't want to do that.

I'm too sleep deprived to do anything much.

HELP!!

Nessa
--
I don't have issues
I have subscriptions
www.nessa.info

2 From: J1Boss
Date: Wed, Sep 18 2002 7:48 am
Email: (J1Boss)

Nessa wrote:
> Problem is it that when I am trying to sleep esp.
> between 1 and 5. I CAN'T just let them bark it
> out (because if I could it's no biggie
> and I can sleep through it).

What the (*&(*)(* are they doing awake between 1 and 5?

> I can live with the banging (as Bagel slams Hannah
> into the wall or Hannah throws one of her bones down
> the uncarpeted steps and they waterfall down the steps
> (there is no other way to describe dogs running down
> wooden steps)

Baby gate. Door.

Do NOT let them wander the house getting
more charged up.

> I'm too sleep deprived to do anything much.
> HELP!!

Nessa - I would seriously consider why these dogs
are up at 1-5 and even thinking they CAN be! They
need to be confined to your room, told firmly to knock
it off, and have that backed up with some sort of
correction if they don't.

If all else fails, tether then away from each other, but
honestly, if they aren't responsive to you telling them
to cut it out, we're back to the "bigger issues" problem.

Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

Maybe she can't scream at her dogs at night?

nessa CONtinues:
> A few weeks ago it started at 5:30 am and it has become
> increasingly earlier until this morning he started at 4:00.
> Ignoring him has proven to be futile, as has calming him
> down and rewarding him with a treat and, as a last resort,
> spraying him with water from a plant sprayer.
>
> This morning I even put him in his crate and took him into
> the bathroom with me as I prepared for work (normally he
> stays in a x-pen in the kitchen) but he only calmed down
> for a few minutes before the whining began again.

A 1 year old should be hanging out with you. Overnight,
around the house, and heck, even neat the bathroom while
you get ready for work..
--
Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

Subject: Puppy license expires
1 From: Nessa
Date: Fri, Jul 26 2002 5:57 am
Email: Nessa >

Yep, she is pretty much housebroken so I let her
out of the crate at night to sleep with me. But last
night, while I was asleep she ATE MY GLASSES.

It's my fault, I left them on the night table (where I
always leave them) so I could see when I got up.

I needed a new pair but I wanted to be able to get
them without having to miss work. Now, poof here
I am glassesless. thank goodness we have 1 hour
glass makers pretty close by.

Well she's crated now until this chewing phase is over.

Hannah will be 5 months old next week. Any advice
on how to deal with this other than the standard, no bite,
here chew this, crating, etc.

Nessa
--
I don't have issues
I have subscriptions
www.nessa.info

nessa's dogs got her EVICTED to boot <{}: ~ ( >

From: Nessa )
Subject: Re: Sad News.. I need someone to take my dogs
Date: 2003-08-26 09:55:03 PST

well I'm not BLAMING my job it's ONE of MANY
things that I'm considering.

As for returning them to their respective shelters,
I don't want to split them up and I'm not going to
give them to just anyone. Possibly because I am
doing everything I can to keep them and drag this
mess out as long as possible in hopes that it will
work out.

=============

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAA~!~!~!

Here's janet's "more positive experience"
with a REAL LIFE IN PERSTON "student":

Subject: Muttley: Now a question of Life or Death
"Paul E. Schoen" > wrote

It is a shame that Muttley will probably be put
down (his appointment is next Wednesday),

Subject: Muttley: Now a question of Life or Death

"Paul E. Schoen" > wrote

Hello everyone:

If you have followed some of my posts, you know
something about the ongoing story of Muttley, the
large GSD/Chow dog I have been trying to adopt
or place in a better home.

I will add a bit more history later in this post.

Last Tuesday, toward the end of Janet's obedience
class, Muttley and I had just finished fairly successfully
performing a sit/stay/come routine, and then he was
sitting by my side.

The final routine was to be a "down", which Muttley
has had some difficulty with, and frankly I have not
had the time to work with him much on that.

I was kneeling at his side, trying to hold his collar
while pushing his front legs down to the position,
while he resisted. Suddenly he lunged, knocking
me over onto the parking lot, and I lost grip of the
leash as I reflexively broke my fall.

Muttley took the opportunity to attack a young black
male Lab to my left, and it was a very brutal attack.
Janet and the instructors tried to gain control, and as
soon as I could get to my feet I grabbed the leash and
pulled him off.

That was the end of the class, and the other dog,
Bernie, was taken to an animal hospital for treatment.

When everyone had left, Janet counseled me about
what should be done about Muttley.

She said this was more than ordinary aggression,
and only intensive (and expensive) one on one
training would have any chance at working, and
in any case, he was not suited to group training.

She advised me that Muttley could be dangerous,
and she recommended that he be euthanized.

"They can't all be saved".

<snip>

--------------

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAA~!~!~!

Subject: Muttley: Now a question of Life or Death
"Paul E. Schoen" > wrote

<snip>

If I did not have to worry about my cat, I would
probably keep him, and I am certain I could avoid
any more dangerous episodes. I probably would
not have taken him to obedience classes at this time
if that was not such a difficult issue, and if people
here had not essentially shamed me into doing so.

Then he would only be a bratty dog with a mind of
his own, but he would not have been identified as
dangerous.

--------------------------

BWEEEAAAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!

Here's janet's REAL LIFE IN PERSON "student" paul:

#2 - 6/05/07

>> When I was training him under Janet's supervision
>> I was instructed to give it a ? firm yank as a correction.

> I advised you to use a prong collar, not give firm
> yanks on a chain choke collar. I hate the things.

>> She was able to get his attention with
>> just a quick tug, but I had to yank on it
>> hard enough to lift him off his feet to get
>> him to respond. Looking back now, I think
>> it was based on his fear, which he had for
>> her (as an unknown), but not for me
>> (whom he had learned to trust).

> He wasn't afraid of me. He knew I was a
> confident trainer. Fear has no place in dog
> training, as I told you THEN.

> Janet

It seems to me that applying stern corrections, by

popping a choker chain, prong collar, or whatever,
is a way to ensure compliance by instilling a fear
of further punishment.

Sure, if it is administered very consistently
by a confident trainer, the dog soon learns
to obey. There was no positive reinforcement,
so what remains is negative.

Also, I recall the time you were going to show me
how I could get Muttley to take his rawhide treat
from me without lunging for it. When you offered
it to him, he refused to take it. This IMHO is likely
a fear behavior.

Things have changed a lot since then, and I have
learned a lot, and Muttley has settled down quite
a bit. I probably still give him too much freedom
to think on his own, but that's just my way of
doing things, and that's probably not going to
change much. He may never win an obedience
medal, but I don't think he is dangerously out
of control, either.

Paul and Muttley

----------------

"I thought I was told that the way to get the dog to go
down was to make him sit and then step onthe leash.
That was awkward and didn't seem to work.

I will confess that I only tried the "down" position

once or twice at home, and I also often used it
instead of "Off" when I wanted him to stop
jumping on me or elsewhere I didn't want him to be.

I had to give him corrections every few seconds,
and also just about kick him, to keep him at my
left side.

Muttley is really a very sweet and loving dog, but
he needs more socialization with other dogs. However,
it is very likely that I will have him put down in a week."

Subject: Muttley: Now a question of Life or Death
"Paul E. Schoen" > wrote

It is a shame that Muttley will probably be put
down (his appointment is next Wednesday),

-----------------------

HERE'S HOWE COME:

Subject: Re: redirected aggression
Date: 4/11/07

"Janet Boss" > wrote in message
...

It seems I have been dealing with this a bit lately.
Dog to dog and dog to person,, with dogs who are
obviously overstimulated by what's in front of them.

What's in front of them varies from people at the door
to dogs in their path or directly in their face. The dogs
in question all have very poor self control.

I have dog(s) with not-so-great-natural self control,
so it's something we constantly work on. We don't
have redirected stuff going on, because we have enough
obedience to avoid it.

While I know that's the big answer for the dogs in
question as well, I'm curious what things people have
found useful to redirect/focus/gain attention from
drivey dogs or just very distracted of over-the-top dogs.

We're having success with my recommendations, but I'm
always open to something novel that may be the hot ticket.
--

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

BWEEEAAAHAHAHAHAAAA~!~!~!

From: (J1Boss)
Date: 2000/10/06
Subject: Re: Shina Inu Experts : Please help!

Dogman, quoting howdy-doody:

>>This is a young puppy, hardly a threat to a kat.

> See? They just cannot conceive of a cat, for example, scratching
> out the eyes of a young puppy because it didn't want to be bothered
> by an over-exurburant puppy (are there any other kinds?).

********** Jerry's never met a puppy, He's never met a
RETRIEVER PUPPY, that's pretty clear. I have a wonderfully
exhuberant retriever puppy - love every minute of it.

My 17 year old cat, doesn't have quite the same appreciation.

Sometimes, Franklin licks his ears and Robie enjoys it. Other
times, Franklin thinks Robie's another puppy and Robie does
not enjoy that. Without my supervision, confinement is only
sensible (of course).

I've got Jer-Jer kill-filed, but the glimpes at his posts, through
re-posts, are good indications that nothing has changed.

> But if a crate is a "barrier" to training a puppy, then what
> must the walls of a SCHOOL ROOM be, eh?

*********** and don't forget cribs for crawling babies, safety
gates, doors, etc. Let's just open up the houses and let everyone
run amok!

> Ladies and gentlemen, he literally counts on many of you
> being too damn stupid or ignorant to see just how little he
> actually knows about dogs, puppies, cats, etc.

> Don't let him, eh?
> Dogman

************** It's so difficult for the newbies, since so many
of the people who DO have good advice, have killfiled him.

Tired of refuting slander and general inaccuracies in his "they're
all bad, I'm good" rants (without any actual training advice, as
usual) is a reality for most.

Are there actually people, besides Marilyn, who believe him?

Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"

>> So get lost.
>
> Who should get lost? Helpful people who are telling you
> that your PUPPY *needs* to be with you instead of being
> treated as a lawn ornament?

RIGHT~! A crated dog is more like a nice piece of furniture <{}: ~ ) >

> Maybe you have the wrong group. I'm sure Home
> Depot or such has a lawn ornament newsgroup.

They'll have a nice ESCAPE PROOF crate for your doggy~!

> --
> Janet Boss
> www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

HOWE MANY DOGS HAVE YOUR MURDERED, janet?

April 3rd 08, 11:01 PM
HOWEDY tiny dancer you pathetic miserable stinkin lyin animal murderin
punk thug coward active accute chronic life long incurable malignant
manic depresive Sado Masochistic MENTAL CASE,

"tiny dancer" > wrote in message
...
>
> "MS" > wrote in message
> ...
>> We don't want the dog to learn that she'll get her way by barking,
>> scratching, and banging on the door. She needs to learn to sit
>> patiently. I don't think I'm expecting a lot.
>
> You're expecting a lot from a three month old puppy.

That's ABSURD. Pryor to three months my student's dogs
have started obedience training. By four months of age my
student's puppys are ready to start protection training <{}: ~ ) >

>> My childhood dog just played outside as long as we left her out.

> All dogs are different, they aren't carbon copies of each other, clones.

Perhaps THAT'S on accHOWENTA your "individualized" "TRAINING"?

> Dogs aren't inanimate objects, always available when
> *you* want to interact with them, but otherwise off
> somewhere, unabtrusive and waiting until you decide
> you want to be with them.

Sez you, tiny dancer? You're full of crap.

"tiny dancer" > wrote in message
...

> "Shelly" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Luna" > wrote in
>> news:[email protected]:
>> > Yeah, but different isn't bad. Remember?
>> That *is* what I said. Not different? Kind of worrisome.
>> You might want to look around for pods.
>
> Anyway, I'm not at all averse to insulting people, when I think
> they're acting like total douchebags. If you don't understand the
> difference between that and calling people names, you might
> want to have your mother explain it to you. And *that* being
> said, I'm not even opposed to calling people names, but there
> are limits. I think names like "****" cross an important line.
> YMMV, obviously, but only if you are a total douchebag.

LMAO. Perhaps you should post a list of what's acceptable
and what isn't in that little mind of yours.

Let's see, douchebag is in the acceptable column, **** is in the
unacceptable column. Can we all say hypocrite. And who died
and made you boss of what's acceptable and what isn't when
it comes to insults? One persons *snide* different, could be
another persons ****.
td

> Dogs are our companions.



"I already own a S&W, .357 and it's neither large nor heavy. It's a
bit smaller, only six shots, whereas dh's holds seven. I've thought
of carrying that, but would prefer something else.


I'm looking for something to use against a rather large, aggressive
pit bull, just in case. I don't think a small .22 would even make a
dent. This is one of those block-headed, really wide-jawed, very
muscular pit bulls.


td "

> Of course they want to be where we are.

"tiny dancer" > wrote in message
.. .

Since I have two rather large dogs, both of whom I
acquired after the puppy stage, I have to be immediate,
firm, harsh when controlling bad behaviors.

When one of mine displays a behavior such as the one
you described, I grab them by the collar and take them
down to their side, repeating NO in a strong, firm voice.

And I keep them down on their side until they submit, relax, etc.

Then I repeat the NO again before letting them back up again.

Don't know if this will help you much, but it does work with mine.

td

---------------------------

> If you have exercised her, walked her, played with her, then
> let her come inside with you. She wants to be with her *people*,
> and not off in the yard somewhere alone. Once she understands
> she's part of your family/pack, she'll find a spot inside to take a nap.

"Although, when we first got Gracie, she was a bit dog
aggressive, and I did grab her by her collar, shouting NO
at her in my most firm commanding voice, and slam her
down to the ground and hold her there.

She weighs about 70 pounds. And doing that only a couple
times, taught her dog aggression was not acceptable behavior.

She no longer does it. But if there is a new dog present, and
I have the slightest doubt as to how she might react, I make
sure she is on a leash until I'm positive she won't be aggressive
towards it."

"I use my prong collars on the dogs when I do something
like that, just to be extra cautious because I have a child
with me. I want to have the best control over them as
possible, just in case they see a cat or something on our walk.

We do tend to see more critters out here in the country, and
the dogs aren't accustomed to all that yet. Lots of people out
here let their dogs roam freely, plus the cats, and we even
come upon the occasional horseback rider. I haven"t had
the time to work with them as much as I'd like yet, because
of my ruptured disc's. I have to take it easy for a few more
months per my physical therapist.

Hope this might help you some,"

"Merlin, on the other hand, is the total opposite of Gracie. He
constantly gives us 'the look'. He has a real attitude. When I
call him, he gives me the "why should I come" look. The "I
don't feel like it" look.

He can be very frustrating at times.

But he's big and goofy and playful, and we love him just
as much. He had two homes before ours that didn't work
out. And in some ways I can see why.

He's a free spirit, a tease, a big play-baby.

He will position himself at one end of the dining room table,
and run me around it like a pro. He watches everything we
do, in order to decide if he chooses to participate."

> I have one dog who enjoys sleeping on the sofa downstairs
> during the day time, and one velcro dog, who will always be
> found napping where ever it is I am in the house. She see's
> it as her duty/job to take care of me. And I appreciate that.

"Now bo, do you remember what I told you one does if
their dog does something objectionable? You grab it
by the collar, put the dog down into a postion of
submission, and hold it there until it understands it's
place in order of the pack.

And when I use the term 'pack' here, I'm not referring
to four dogs. I'm referring to dog/human. And need I
even mention the fact that these were Rottweilers/Chow mixes????

I think pretty much everyone here who know's anything about
dogs has voiced their opinion about avoiding CHOWS. You
certainly don't go out and breed a CHOW with a rottie to get
a better PROTECTION dog.

If I've forgotten anything else, please feel free to remind me."

-----------------------

> If someone comes to the door, she is right there beside me,
> letting any strangers know that she's here to protect me. It's
> a nice, comforting feeling.

Newsgroups: alt.support.trauma-ptsd

From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 16:12:18 GMT

Subject: Re: Why I'm so ****ed off at whats going on

Hi Larry,

It's okay, they can maybe catch a couple of us off guard for a
little while but all they end up doing is showing us in some
ways how far we've come in our therapy.

Like for instance, I can't stand these women who say stuff
like "I don't know if I could ever shoot anybody?" in that
whimpy voice. I know I could blow away some asshole if
they were trying to get to me in a heartbeat.

I know I'd use the little Smith & Wesson my husband got
me, but I sure do like to rack up his Remington. I like the
feeling of power that sound gives me.

He says it would stop a bear and I believe that. And that's
why I like my big dogs around me. Whiskey, the ridgeback/
rottie mix has the grace and elegance of the ridgeback but
the rottie jaws all the way and she hates men.

It takes her a long time to warm up to the "good guys", bad
guys forget it. She loves women, but for some reason men
have to be around for quite some time before she accepts them.

We think she was abused by a man/men before we rescued
her because of her reactions to them. And you know those
ridgebacks were originally lion hunters so she runs like the
wind and has these incredible muscles in her whole body.

But when her jaws grab something my husband can pick all
80lbs of her off the floor and she just hangs on to whatever
she's got in her mouth. Murphy is only about 65 lbs, but
very protective also, and the new baby, although only about
30 lbs right now, looks to be the biggest of all judging by the
size of her paws.

She's a little hellion right now though, teething and biting
everything that gets in her way. She's replacing Coda who
died last year. He was 120lbs of muscle with the lowest
growl you'd ever want to hear, made peoples hair
stand on end when you heard that growl.

So see how far I've come with my therapy. I'm sure when I
began my therapist didn't ever in a million years think I'd end
up with a pistol and a pack of big dogs, but hey, he says
whatever works for you.

tiny dancer

==============

"She's very much an alpha dog in her behaviors.

I have to continually work at convincing her that I am the
pack leader around here, not her. ;-) I always win, but
she does keep trying to challenge my authority.

And when she stands up on her back legs, she's just about
as tall as me, 5' 5". So when she throws herself at the front
windows, barking and growling, she does look quite intimidating
to strangers."

> Give your girl time. She'll work out her days eventually.

Newsgroups: alt.support.trauma-ptsd
From: "tiny dancer" >

Date: Wed, 04 Jul 2001 05:00:48 GMT

Subject: Re: Highs and Lows

Sorry to hear about your awful week! :-( And also sorry guys, I
sent a blank message before this, just haven't had enough coffee
yet to think straight, (and daughter just called, asked if **** bag
could come back to stay today, so I guess I spoke too fast, grandma
probably will have it on her oriental carpet yet! They are moving
this weekend, that's why doggie stays here!)

Anyway, Kat I'm really sorry to hear about your asthma. I
know how that can be as all three of my girls had asthma.
Two of them pretty bad.

Sorry this has taken so long, but it's been a rough week! Yes, I
said yes again! :-( She had my son in law, whom I adore, call.

They brought **** bag over first thing in the morning, set her
down in the kitchen and she immediately ran into my living
room and **** on the oriental carpet again!

Honestly, no lie! So that shot my *high* for the week all to hell!

Then I got roped into watching her Monday again.

I could just kick this daughter in the ass!

She knows because she's pregnant she can get away with more.
The house they rented doesn't allow pets, so the idiots went ahead
and rented it anyway and when work people are supposed to come
to the house I get stuck with **** bag!

Grrrrrrrrrr Somethings gonna have to give because
I'm sick of it already and they just moved in Saturday!

-------------------------------

> Like I said, I have one who is perfectly happy to do his own
> thing, and one who likes to be with me. Your puppy isn't old
> enough, experienced enough, to have developed a routine yet.

"tiny dancer" > wrote in message news:AHxRi.
...
>
> "Shelly" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Luna" > wrote in
>> news:[email protected]:
>>
>> Yeah, but different isn't bad. Remember?
>>
> That *is* what I said. Not different? Kind of worrisome.
> You might want to look around for pods.
>
> Anyway, I'm not at all averse to insulting people, when I think
> they're acting like total douchebags. If you don't understand the
> difference between that and calling people names, you might
> want to have your mother explain it to you. And *that* being
> said, I'm not even opposed to calling people names, but there
> are limits. I think names like "****" cross an important line.
> YMMV, obviously, but only if you are a total douchebag.

LMAO. Perhaps you should post a list of what's acceptable
and what isn't in that little mind of yours.

Let's see, douchebag is in the acceptable column, **** is in the
unacceptable column. Can we all say hypocrite. And who died
and made you boss of what's acceptable and what isn't when
it comes to insults? One persons *snide* different, could be
another persons ****.

td

---------------------

Thank you for clarifyin that, td <{}: ~ ) >

> Right now she wants and needs to be where you are.
> Some day you might appreciate that.

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAA~!~!~!


Newsgroups: alt.animals.dog
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001 01:35:41 GMT

Subject: Re: DUDLEY AND DYLAN

My daughter did bring the crates, but if you put Monty in a crate
she howls and cries until you take her out again. I've been trying
to keep her awake, outside in the fresh air, running and playing
all day. She does get tired and sleep eventually, but so far I'm
only getting about 5 hours sleep a night.

She goes to sleep much earlier than I'm able to, and is up
again much before I'd like! :-( Thank goodness one of my
other daughters came by today and ran them around the back
yard with tennis balls for a good part of the afternoon as I was
so exhausted I just collapsed on my bed!

Only four more nights to go, hope I make it.

tiny dancer

-----------------------

Newsgroups: alt.animals.dog
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 19:41:00 GMT
Subject: Re: Just unbelievable

"diddy" > wrote in message
...

> I think the reason the issues of protecting dogs are because,
> Human relationships always involve pain, diplomacy, hard
> work in building, conditions, giving, and often unbelievable
> emotional damage.
>
> A dog is close and personal. Their fur soaks up tears, They
> don't judge.
>
> They are the only being who you can share your true self. It's
> unconditional. You give little and reap such enormous returns
>.They would give their life to you without a thought. Such noble
> beasts being tortured is beyond such comprehension that
> those blessed with such relationships is more than the
> passionate dog lover can bear.
>
> Such injustice goes past laws that bind people by government
> or sense. It's something much more primordial than that.
>
> We all know by law, a dog is property. That makes no sense at
> all. it just doesn't compute. It's far MORE than that. I am a
> basically non-violent person, and I can think of only one thing
> that would bring me to the point of murder. This wouldn't
> necessarily be personal defense, family defense, but without a
> doubt, the defense of my dog.

Totally agree with you here. And I think the laws should be
changed. A dog is much more than personal property, they
have enormous feelings and emotions. We who love them
have seen their emotions. In fact I read somewhere that dogs
feel things even more than humans.

Some dog researcher, can't remember his name. When one of
my daughters dogs died unexpectedly her other dog was devastated.

Coda was a huge chocolate lab, way too heavy for her husband
to move alone, so when we arrived at their house it took three
grown men to carry him out. After they carried him down to our
SUV her other dog Brandy went over to the spot where Coda had
lain, sat right down there. I went to sit beside her and comfort her
and as she looked up at me I saw a huge tear in each of her eyes.

She knew, she understood, and she 'hurt' deeply.

My own dog Murphy is very intelligent, understands most,
if not all, of what's being said, going on around her. If you
study most animals I think you'll find they share deep emotions.

In my opinion they should be valued, shown the same amount
of respect and protection under the law as we humans. I know
my opinions probably don't conform to most, but I value life,
any life, and I don't value a human life 'more' than that of my
dog.

If anyone hurt my dog I wouldn't think twice about shooting
them if that was the only way to make them stop. She is just
like any other member of my family.

tiny dancer

-----------------------------

Newsgroups: alt.animals.dog
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2002 05:16:46 GMT

Subject: Re: puppy cries while chewing toys?
"weric" > wrote in message
...

> we just adopted a 4 month old hound mix puppy (i think
> bloodhound and beagle) from a no kill shelter. he has a few
> squeaky toys and when he's chewing on them he whimpers /
> cries. why is that? could this be part of teething, or maybe the
> squeaking bothers him?

> anyone else ever have this? is it a problem?

I don't think it's any problem, murphy does that sometimes.

I always took it to be some show of emotion, who knows what
goes through their minds sometimes. Sometimes, if she's got
something really special, she'll pace around the house crying
'searching' for just the right hiding spot, as if hubby or I might
steal it!

Since she's an only child it's not as if some
other dog is going to come along and 'find' it. :-)

td

------------------------

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAAHAAA~!~!~!

tiny dancer's dogs are DYIN from STRESS INDUCED AUTO-
IMMUNE DIS-EASES and self mutilation a.k.a. The Puppy
Wizard's SYNDROME as a direct result of her OBEDIENCE
TRAINING:

Newsgroups: alt.support.loneliness
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 04:28:40 GMT

Subject: Re: Beer

So glad to hear Muffin is doing better. Just got home from the
hospital today myself, no malignancies but I'm in alot of pain
and can't sit at the computer more than a few minutes. Do we
know what was wrong with Muffin??

Again, I'm so glad to hear about Muffin, I just can't tell you how
much better that makes me feel. My own baby had reached her
limit last night and was about to have a nervous breakdown without
her mama.

I was told she just stood there shaking, teeth chattering, she
was a real basket case. Needless to say, she too is feeling
alot better tonight. :-) Murphy is a lab/springer spaniel mix
and she's 10 years old now.

She had an ultra sound last summer and if at all possible
get them to let you stay with her. I told them Murphy
would be alot better if I was with her so they gave it a try,
and we did just fine.

She gets really "stressed" when seperated from us, but as
long as I held her front half in place and talked to her, and
a vet tech held her back half in place they didn't have to
sedate her to do the procedure. She weighs about 65lbs.
so she can be a handful.

Be sure to let us know what they find, as I've really been
thinking about her. Okay, my time is up, have to go lay
down again.

Best Wishes,

tiny dancer

-----------------------------

Newsgroups: alt.support.loneliness
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 19:06:09 GMT

Subject: Re: I misjudged Muffin

Hi Nick,

Our Murphy had pancreatitis a few years ago, and sometimes
with something serious a few hours can make a big difference.
Our Murphy girl pulled through, and I'm not saying that's what's
wrong with Muffin, it's only that I learned how important quick
action is in some situations.

Dogs apparently can become dehydrated pretty quickly.
They put her on IV fluids and she was hospitalized for
three days in intensive care. We love her as much as
you must love Muffin, hope I'll hear how she is before
I have to go.

Take care and give Muffin a kiss for me,

---------------------------

Newsgroups: alt.animals.dog
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 18:21:51 GMT

Subject: Foot-biter?????

Hi Guys,

Anybody have a better idea of what to do when Murphy
chews a spot off the top of her foot?? She nibbles away
until there's a patch about dime size where all the hair is
gone.

I put an antibiotic cream on it, and put baby booties over
her foot so she can't chew it. It works for awhile, until she
manages to work the bootie off. I try to keep up with her,
but she goes and hides somewhere in the house because
she knows she's supposed to leave that bootie on, so if I
don't catch her right away she's able to chew a bit more
before I can get the bootie back on.

I don't want to try anything with alcohol or anything because
it looks kind of raw and I don't want it to sting her. I was
thinking more if anybody had a better idea to cover it than a
baby bootie??

Thanks,

tiny dancer

------------------

Newsgroups: alt.animals.dog

From: "Diana" >
Date: Wed, 26 Sep 2001 08:16:57 +0100

Subject: Re: Stone

Going away tomorrow night & been too busy to look in much
but Stone, as Murphy, does it for nerve / 'comfort' - a bit like
I chew my fingers. she ONLY does it when she's unhappy or
feels insecure, like when I'm not there or if say in the night she
feels she may not be loved enough ~ sorry to 'humanise' her
here but I don't know her exact feelings but thwe patterns are
that obvious.

When, as she is now, she's right there beside me she's the
happiest, brightest & most.. well she's just brimming with
love & joy and for the sake of me just being careful to
prevent her from feeling bad / protecting her from herself
when I can't be there, I'm not going to zonk out her normal,
everyday 'brightness'.

I had to go out all day yesterday, so collared her & gave her
a big bone to pre-occupy her while I left. Unfortunately the
collar fell off & she got her 'knee' quite badly. Pete got home
before I did & he said she literally cowered from him - so
the B******d told her off!!!

These things don't help & I am battling every day to educate
Pete into being a little more sympathetic.... I think I would
find her problems easier if he weren't so quick to shout at her.
--
http://website.lineone.net/~diana_pete.attwood

----------------------------

Newsgroups: alt.animals.dog
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 04:08:26 GMT

Subject: Stone

I'm still having a problem getting all the messages, but I read
something about Stone chewing herself?? I have to agree here,

I don't know why your vet said it would affect her quality of life.
I hear all the time about dogs being on prozac and it helping alot.

Murphy gets in periods where she chews herself too, especially
the tops of her feet and her tail. It seems like certain times of the
year with her, like fall time she does more chewing on herself.

She doesn't sound as bad as Stoney, but my vet did tell me it
was "nerves". Like once she starts gnawing away on a part
of her, she just keeps at it. Sometimes I put stuff on her for
itching, like spray some sort of benedryl product, the vet has
given her oral benedryl too, to help with itching.

We do use an oatmeal shampoo to bathe her and that seems to
help. It's supposed to help calm the skin. Sorry if any of these
things have already been mentioned, but I only caught a part of
this story.

tiny dancer

-------------------

Newsgroups: alt.support.trauma-ptsd
From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 18:44:18 GMT

Subject: Re: the jungle (trigger warning)

Hi, I guess here is where one puts triggers??

Your experience triggered a memory in me of the same
sort of situation. I too was in my closet, preparing for a
move, going through boxes of things, sorting, whether
to move or discard. I came upon a box I hadn't opened in
years.

My ptsd is due to an abusive childhood.

So I opened this box and found a small red book, a diary.
I kind of remembered the book, seeing it before. All of my
early memories were repressed at this time in my life.

So I eagerly opened the book to see what was inside. I began
reading a page at random. I don't recall what it said, I just
remember whatever it said triggered horror in me.

I threw the book across the room, screaming, crying hysterically.
I did that for a long time, until I was cried out, exhausted, then I
mechanically walked across the room to where the diary had landed,
picked it up, took it all the way outside, through the snow, to the
trash cans. The waste basket in the kitchen wouldn't do.

Something in me knew I had to get it out of the house.

I threw it in the trash can, went back inside, and continued on
as if it never happened. I didn't even remember it happening
at all until years later in therapy.

tiny dancer

----------------------------

Newsgroups: alt.support.trauma-ptsd

From: "tiny dancer" >
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 04:38:43 GMT

Subject: Re: Why I'm so ****ed off at whats going on

"Ming the Mirthless" > wrote in message
...
> "tiny dancer" > wrote in message
> . com...

> > Thanks Larry, you said it so well. Lots of us have similar
> > triggers and different reactions. I know that "deer in the
> > headlights" stance well. Frozen in fear. I wish I did that
> > fight or flight thing better. If I'm in the right place I can
> > sometimes do the fight, but if not the flight always escapes
> > me, it ends up being frozen in fear. So many times I've
> > opened my mouth to scream and nothing comes out,
> > even the scream is frozen inside.

> I bet you give a good blow job though.

> Ming

Ya know what Ming, I didn't really see how cruel you guys really
are over there in alt war, but I see it now. We've got others here
who might be triggered by this as I am.

Right now all I can say is I hope someday somebody rapes you.

tiny dancer

----------------
Newsgroups: rec.pets.dogs.behavior
From:
Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2008 17:55:26 -0800 (PST)

Subject: Re: Melinda: Mushing in Ontario

On Feb 3, 10:38�am, "tiny dancer"
> wrote:
"Shelly" > wrote in message
> ...

> > "tiny dancer" > wrote in
> :

> >> Actually not. �This would be a very large, very block-headed,
> >> very thick-necked, wide- jawed pit bull that is tethered to a run
> >> that doesn't at all look strong enough to hold my own Gracie.

> > Have you considered talking to the owner? �Or do you really
> > intend to kill someone's dog without giving them a chance to
> > secure it to your specifications?

> > Also, do you not have animal control where you live?

> Of course I considered talking to the owner, but since the dog is
> on a run extending the width of the persons front property, I don't
> see any way to accomplish that. �Since you are responding to a
> stalker to begin with, you should expect to not have gotten the
> correct info. �I was asking for info about the difference between
> stun guns and tasers, the rest was prompted by other posters and
> replied to in sarcasm. �I also had a number of responses of a
> poisoning nature which I simply ignored completely.

Stalker? How about disgusted husband?

Liar! Liar! Pants on fire!


First, have a look at this map of the neighborhood and tell us which
house has the scary dog, and why you think there's a "business"
there.
Second, you can find the owner's phone number at this site and give
them a call :)


http://tinyurl.com/23u5zh

Third, you need to reread the thread. You are totally misrepresenting
what was said. One person suggested chocolate - no one else even
mentioned poison. And you don't recognize sarcasm, much less know
how to use it.

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.true-crime/browse_thread/thread/91...



> � Yes we have animal control, but the dog is *restrained* on it's
> property, for now. �I have since spoken to two others of my neighbors,
> both also terrified that dog is going to get free. �Both told me they
> never walk off our road because of it. �
>
> The woman who owns the CBR said that is one of the reasons
> they don't confine their dog to their property, rather allowing it
> to accompany their boys, to protect them. �The other woman I
> spoke to also walks her dog and explained to me the rather limited
> route she has been forced to take in walking her dog because she
> too *accidentally* came upon this dog one day, just as I did.
>
> �Both of these other people also own dogs and are comfortable
> around them, especially the dad in the CBR family. �They all
> consider this dog to be highly vicious in temperament. �
>
> The property where it's located has a *business* of sorts. �It's
> obvious this dog is meant to *guard* that property, hence the
> long run it has. �It is able to run from one side of the property
> to the complete other side.

There isn't enough traffic on that road to support a "business."
You're just making this all up because you want some attention
right now.

-----------------

tiny dancer CONcludes with this self observation:
So see how far I've come with my therapy. I'm sure when I
began my therapist didn't ever in a million years think I'd end
up with a pistol and a pack of big dogs, but hey, he says whatever
works for you.

tiny dancer

-------------------------

STAND UP, tiny dancer, you pathetic dog abusin coward.

You wanna HURT a innocent dog?

GET THE HEEL HOWETA MY STAGE <{}: ~ ( >Thank you,
Steve Wilkos,


http://relinkz.com/Steve_Wilkos_Productions_Behavior_Manual