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Charles Packer
April 7th 08, 11:33 AM
Our 12-year-old cat developed diabetes suddenly. He's now
on Glipizide. How critical is the dosage size? This cat's
behavior now is not anywhere near his original kittenish
feistiness.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

Spot[_2_]
April 7th 08, 12:35 PM
Its very critical that the cat get the correct dosage. Too much or too
little can kill the cat you need to work with your vet on this.

Celeste

"Charles Packer" > wrote in message
...
> Our 12-year-old cat developed diabetes suddenly. He's now
> on Glipizide. How critical is the dosage size? This cat's
> behavior now is not anywhere near his original kittenish
> feistiness.
>
> --
> Charles Packer
> http://cpacker.org/whatnews
> mailboxATcpacker.org

Charles Packer
April 8th 08, 12:18 PM
On Apr 7, 7:35*am, "Spot" > wrote:
> Its very critical that the cat get the correct dosage. *Too much or too
> little can kill the cat you need to work with your vet on this.
>

What would have happened if that cat hadn't been treated at
all? Except for a lot of drinking water and peeing, his behavior
otherwise was normal. If his condition were fatal, at least
we would have a memory of him as normal up to the end.
But he's my wife's cat, and she decides what gets done.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

Rene S.
April 8th 08, 05:08 PM
On Apr 8, 6:18*am, Charles Packer > wrote:
> On Apr 7, 7:35*am, "Spot" > wrote:
>
> > Its very critical that the cat get the correct dosage. *Too much or too
> > little can kill the cat you need to work with your vet on this.
>
> What would have happened if that cat hadn't been treated at
> all? Except for a lot of drinking water and peeing, his behavior
> otherwise was normal. If his condition were fatal, at least
> we would have a memory of him as normal up to the end.

This is absolutely not true that you would have a memory of him as
normal up to the end. I have a friend that works for a vet clinic as a
diabetes technincian, and she told me that the use of Glipizide is
"old-school" thinking and rarely works in cats. Diabetics need insulin
or they risk developing fatal ketoacidosis/kidney failure. It is
likely that's where your cat is headed right now, and why he's not
acting right. If this cat doesn't get the right treatment quickly, he
could very well end up dead.

The good news is if the cat is immediately put on a low-carb, canned-
only, grain-free diet (she uses Wellness Beef and Chicken, Turkey, and
Turkey and Salmon for the diabetics she works with), the owners home-
test blood sugar using a glucometer such as the One Touch Ultra and
keep the cat's numbers within the normal range using insulin it is
more likely than not that the cat will go into remission and insulin
will no longer be necessary as long as the cat is NEVER fed dry food
again and is kept on the right diet. Implementing a weight loss
program for obese diabetics is also important, but this is simple to
do considering that a diabetic cat should NOT be free fed and should
eat measured amounts of canned food on a 12 hour schedule.

If you want me to hook your wife up with my friend for a consultation
so she has a better understanding of what's involved email me and I'll
see what I can do. She has so far had a 100% success rate with getting
diabetics off of insulin.

Charles Packer
April 10th 08, 03:06 AM
On Apr 8, 12:24*pm, "cindys" > wrote:
> The good news is if the cat is immediately put on a low-carb, canned-
> only, grain-free diet (she uses Wellness Beef and Chicken, Turkey, and
> Turkey and Salmon for the diabetics she works with), the owners home-
> test blood sugar using a glucometer such as the One Touch Ultra and


He's at least moving toward a low-carb diet by default,
since my wife is trying to find tasty food in which to
dissolve his Glipizide dose. I would question the use
of Glipizide too, on the grounds that, based upon what
I read in Wikipedia, he's been prescribed a human-sized
dose -- 5 mg -- albeit twice a day instead of every
5 hours, the way humans take it. But my wife and I agree that
we don't want to be sticking him with a needle regularly,
for any purpose; she because she'd have to do it -- this
is where I say "It's your cat" -- and I because it seems
ridiculous to torture an animal so it can be your
companion for a little while longer.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

MaryL
April 10th 08, 04:11 AM
"Charles Packer" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 8, 12:24 pm, "cindys" > wrote:
> The good news is if the cat is immediately put on a low-carb, canned-
> only, grain-free diet (she uses Wellness Beef and Chicken, Turkey, and
> Turkey and Salmon for the diabetics she works with), the owners home-
> test blood sugar using a glucometer such as the One Touch Ultra and


He's at least moving toward a low-carb diet by default,
since my wife is trying to find tasty food in which to
dissolve his Glipizide dose. I would question the use
of Glipizide too, on the grounds that, based upon what
I read in Wikipedia, he's been prescribed a human-sized
dose -- 5 mg -- albeit twice a day instead of every
5 hours, the way humans take it. But my wife and I agree that
we don't want to be sticking him with a needle regularly,
for any purpose; she because she'd have to do it -- this
is where I say "It's your cat" -- and I because it seems
ridiculous to torture an animal so it can be your
companion for a little while longer.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

Lantus would be a much better choice, and this would not necessarily prolong
your cat's life for only "a little while longer." It also is not torture.
People who deal with diabetic cats have had a very high response rate --
nearly 100% -- if they adopt cat food without grains (cats do not need
carbs), monitor blood glucose regularly, and administer insulin precisely as
needed. This is likely to be temporary if you and your wife will stick to
the routine because cats often go into remission in a very short period of
time.

To answer your specific question: Dosage is *critical.* You need to check
blood glucose levels at home (very easy to do) and not merely "guess" at the
correct dose.

Please read Rene's message carefully. It is excellent advice.

MaryL

Phil P.
April 10th 08, 07:40 AM
"Charles Packer" > wrote in message
news:190ebe08-982a-4911-8ced-
>He's at least moving toward a low-carb diet by default,
>since my wife is trying to find tasty food in which to
>dissolve his Glipizide dose. I would question the use
>of Glipizide too, on the grounds that, based upon what
>I read in Wikipedia, he's been prescribed a human-sized
>dose -- 5 mg -- albeit twice a day instead of every
>5 hours, the way humans take it. But my wife and I agree that
>we don't want to be sticking him with a needle regularly,
>for any purpose; she because she'd have to do it -- this
>is where I say "It's your cat" -- and I because it seems
>ridiculous to torture an animal so it can be your
..companion for a little while longer.

Charles,

I've treated many diabetic cats- at least a few dozen over the years- and I
can say, based on actual experience, Glipizide does not work, over the long
run, in the vast majority of diabetic cats. The failure rate in cats is
~75-80%. The most serious- and potentially life-threatening side effect of
Glipizide in cats is loss of appetite and nausea. Loss of appetite in a
diabetic cat that's receiving Glipizide can result in *profound*
hypoglycemia. The higher the dose the greater the chance- and severity of
adverse effects. The dose your cat has been prescribed is *twice* the
normal initial dose. I strongly suggest you seek a second opinion from a vet
who is current in treating diabetic cats.

Btw, how was your cat diagnosed with diabetes? IOW, what prompted the visit
to the vet or was diabetes an incidental finding during a routine exam?
Also, do you remember what your cat's blood glucose levels were and if
glucose was found in his urine? This is *very* important. If your cat's BG
was high and glucose wasn't found in the urine, he may not even be diabetic.
Does your cat get very stressed out from trips to the vet? I need more
information to go on before I can make any suggestions.

As far a "torturing" your cat, here's a short video of testing a cat's
blood:

http://maxshouse.com/bgtest%5B1%5D.mpg

Giving insulin injections is even easier on them.

You and your wife might want to join the Yahoo Feline Diabetes group.


http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Felinediabetes/

Get back to me with the BG numbers.

Best of luck,

Phil

Charles Packer
April 10th 08, 11:11 AM
On Apr 9, 11:57*pm, "cindys" > wrote:
> It's not torturing the animal. The insulin needle is teeny and the
injection
> is right under the skin. It takes a second to inject the insulin. The cat

You're right; I should have used "annoy." At any rate, I'll report
all these followups to my wife. She might be responsive to the
idea of going to another vet, since the one she has been using
stood her up yesterday -- left on some emergency without calling
her to cancel her appointment.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

Rene S.
April 10th 08, 03:56 PM
> If your wife is hesitant to check blood glucoses at home, the vet tech will
> do it. But if she is willing to check at home, see if you can find a free
> glucometer. Normally, they cost in the neighborhood of $100,

Nowaways, meters can be gotten for a song. Do a search on eBay for
OneTouch Ultra Mini (this is the meter my friend recommends to her
clients). You can get them for about $10 (including shipping), and
they even come in colors. Also, you can get test strips for about half
price on eBay. Just watch the expiration dates of the strips and make
sure the sellers have good feedback.

Charles Packer
April 11th 08, 11:31 AM
On Apr 10, 2:40*am, "Phil P." > wrote:
>
> I've treated many diabetic cats- at least a few dozen over the years- and I
> can say, based on actual experience, Glipizide does not work, over the long
> run, in the vast majority of diabetic cats. The failure rate in cats is
> ~75-80%. *The most serious- and potentially life-threatening side effect of
> Glipizide in cats is loss of appetite and nausea. Loss of appetite in a
> diabetic cat that's receiving Glipizide can result in *profound*
> hypoglycemia. *The higher the dose the greater the chance- and severity of
> adverse effects. *The dose your cat has been prescribed is *twice* the
> normal initial dose. I strongly suggest you seek a second opinion from a vet
> who is current in treating diabetic cats.
>


My wife read all the postings in this thread and then
spoke to an acquaintance who's a vet tech. Pretty
much confirmed what was recommended here. The PetSmart
vet she was going to had been leading her astray.
So she'll take the cat to a vet who will endorse the
insulin + no-carb diet, probably. Life will become more
complicated, not to mention more constrained for our
dear companion animal. Sigh...on the other hand, if we'd
all grown up on farms, we'd have a different perspective --
more balanced, perhaps -- on the relative value of
human and animal lives...

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

MaryL
April 11th 08, 12:44 PM
"Charles Packer" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 10, 2:40 am, "Phil P." > wrote:
>
> I've treated many diabetic cats- at least a few dozen over the years- and
> I
> can say, based on actual experience, Glipizide does not work, over the
> long
> run, in the vast majority of diabetic cats. The failure rate in cats is
> ~75-80%. The most serious- and potentially life-threatening side effect of
> Glipizide in cats is loss of appetite and nausea. Loss of appetite in a
> diabetic cat that's receiving Glipizide can result in *profound*
> hypoglycemia. The higher the dose the greater the chance- and severity of
> adverse effects. The dose your cat has been prescribed is *twice* the
> normal initial dose. I strongly suggest you seek a second opinion from a
> vet
> who is current in treating diabetic cats.
>


My wife read all the postings in this thread and then
spoke to an acquaintance who's a vet tech. Pretty
much confirmed what was recommended here. The PetSmart
vet she was going to had been leading her astray.
So she'll take the cat to a vet who will endorse the
insulin + no-carb diet, probably. Life will become more
complicated, not to mention more constrained for our
dear companion animal. Sigh...on the other hand, if we'd
all grown up on farms, we'd have a different perspective --
more balanced, perhaps -- on the relative value of
human and animal lives...

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

This is *great* news. I'm so glad to hear that your wife is going to see
another vet. Incidentally, I would never use the PetSmart vets for
anything, so I think this will be much better all around. Please suggest
that your wife make the change ASAP. This is one of those times when delay
in effective treatment can have very serious consequences.

Thank you!! And please thank your wife.!!

MaryL


MaryL

Charles Packer
April 14th 08, 12:21 PM
On Apr 11, 9:15*am, "cindys" > wrote:
> I just love a happy ending! May you and your wife and your cat have many
> long, happy, healthy years together. Please keep us updated on how your cat
> is doing.


Sorry, no happy ending. The new vet found a liver problem
as well. The word came back that the animal would have to
be fed a truckload of pills as well as endure the insulin
shots. We had the cat euthanized and buried him in our
back yard. So this was the outcome of plan A, which
gutted my wife's bank account. Plan B, which I had favored,
would have been to not treat the condition at all. At the
time it appeared, the cat simply drank a lot of water and
peed a lot, but was otherwise normal. I would have waited
until he seemed to be in pain or became obviously sickly
and weak, at which time I would have had him euthanized.
Hence my question earlier in the thread, never answered,
as to what actually would have happened if the condition
were not treated.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

dgk
April 14th 08, 03:46 PM
On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 04:21:53 -0700 (PDT), Charles Packer
> wrote:

>On Apr 11, 9:15*am, "cindys" > wrote:
>> I just love a happy ending! May you and your wife and your cat have many
>> long, happy, healthy years together. Please keep us updated on how your cat
>> is doing.
>
>
>Sorry, no happy ending. The new vet found a liver problem
>as well. The word came back that the animal would have to
>be fed a truckload of pills as well as endure the insulin
>shots. We had the cat euthanized and buried him in our
>back yard. So this was the outcome of plan A, which
>gutted my wife's bank account. Plan B, which I had favored,
>would have been to not treat the condition at all. At the
>time it appeared, the cat simply drank a lot of water and
>peed a lot, but was otherwise normal. I would have waited
>until he seemed to be in pain or became obviously sickly
>and weak, at which time I would have had him euthanized.
>Hence my question earlier in the thread, never answered,
>as to what actually would have happened if the condition
>were not treated.


Oh, sorry to hear that. Sometimes it costs a lot of money to find out
that there is nothing we can do, but because I love my cats I spend
the money; they are part of the family after all. Deciding whether to
treat and quality of life is a very difficult decision for most of us.
Not for you though.

Healthcare costs money, whether it's for people or for animals.
Keeping a cat in distress until it falls over isn't an option for me.
I'm glad "the animal" had your wife to look after it because you
apparently don't count.

I guess no one answered your earlier question because, well, without
spending some money to find out what is wrong, no one can answer the
question.

Outsider
April 14th 08, 11:08 PM
Charles Packer > wrote in
:

> On Apr 11, 9:15*am, "cindys" > wrote:
>> I just love a happy ending! May you and your wife and your cat have
>> many long, happy, healthy years together. Please keep us updated on
>> how your ca
> t
>> is doing.
>
>
> Sorry, no happy ending. The new vet found a liver problem
> as well. The word came back that the animal would have to
> be fed a truckload of pills as well as endure the insulin
> shots. We had the cat euthanized and buried him in our
> back yard. So this was the outcome of plan A, which
> gutted my wife's bank account. Plan B, which I had favored,
> would have been to not treat the condition at all. At the
> time it appeared, the cat simply drank a lot of water and
> peed a lot, but was otherwise normal. I would have waited
> until he seemed to be in pain or became obviously sickly
> and weak, at which time I would have had him euthanized.
> Hence my question earlier in the thread, never answered,
> as to what actually would have happened if the condition
> were not treated.
>
> --
> Charles Packer
> http://cpacker.org/whatnews
> mailboxATcpacker.org




So the entire point of your post was to be able to show your wife that
you were right and she was wrong? Well, you win!

MaryL
April 15th 08, 03:14 AM
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Charles Packer" > wrote in message
> ...
> On Apr 11, 9:15 am, "cindys" > wrote:
>> I just love a happy ending! May you and your wife and your cat have many
>> long, happy, healthy years together. Please keep us updated on how your
>> cat
>> is doing.
>
>
>>Sorry, no happy ending. The new vet found a liver problem
> as well. The word came back that the animal would have to
> be fed a truckload of pills as well as endure the insulin
> shots. We had the cat euthanized and buried him in our
> back yard.
>
> I am so sorry to hear that.
>
>>So this was the outcome of plan A, which
> gutted my wife's bank account. Plan B, which I had favored,
> would have been to not treat the condition at all.
>
> The condition you were talking about was *diabetes* NOT a liver problem.
> It is extremely unfortunate that your cat had more than one thing going
> on, but that doesn't mean that the advice we gave you about the *diabetes*
> was incorrect.
>
>>At the
> time it appeared, the cat simply drank a lot of water and
> peed a lot, but was otherwise normal.
>
> Drinking a lot of water and peeing a lot can be a symptom of many things,
> many of which are treatable. Thyroid disease is another easily treatable
> condition which can manifest this way. Thyroid disease is easy and cheap
> to treat. You presented us with a *diagnosis* from a veterinarian. If you
> had presented only the symptoms, we would have advised you to have the cat
> tested to find out what was the diagnosis.
>
>>I would have waited
> until he seemed to be in pain or became obviously sickly
> and weak, at which time I would have had him euthanized.
>
> With untreated diabetes, the cat was already sickly and suffering. Cats
> hide their pain very well. If the cat had had only diabetes, he would have
> been feeling much better by now from the insulin shots, and your wife
> would have been so happy. And if the cat had had thyroid disease, he would
> have been feeling much better right now from (inexpensive) medication.
> This was a very sad outcome, but our advice was still on-target for a cat
> with diabetes.
>
>>Hence my question earlier in the thread, never answered,
> as to what actually would have happened if the condition
> were not treated.
>
> We did answer you. We told you that a cat with untreated *diabetes* would
> have a short and sickly life. To elaborate, the glucose would have clogged
> up his organs and he could have lost his eyesight, had organ failure, and
> nerve damage. Except the reality is that the cat also had a liver
> problem, which the first vet (who was clearly incompetent) failed to
> diagnose. So, your wife took the cat to a competent vet and got an
> accurate diagnosis. We have all lost animals that we love, and grieving
> takes a while. You told us your cat had *diabetes,* and we advised you
> that the veterinarian was treating it incorrectly and to see another vet
> about giving insulin shots. That advice still stands with a cat with
> diabetes. There was never any discussion of liver disease in any of your
> earlier posts. There was discussion of seeing another vet, which your wife
> did, and the new vet made an accurate diagnosis. The fact of the matter is
> that your cat had liver disease, and that would have been true whether you
> had seen the second vet or not. That is a sad outcome, but we gave you
> good advice.
>
> The bottom line is that when the cat got sick, what you really wanted to
> do was nothing. You wanted to let the cat die and not treat him. You're
> angry with us because we advised you to go to a competent vet and have him
> treated. And that cost money. And as an unfortunate twist of fate, he had
> an incurable disease in addition to the diabetes, which no one knew about
> until the new vet diagnosed it, and now you're angry that your wife spent
> money on the Lantus insulin, and we all should have been mind-readers and
> known that the cat had liver disease and/or we should have told you to
> leave the cat untreated and let him die. The people on this group are
> focused on helping cats to live, and no one here would ever advise someone
> to leave an easily treatable medical condition like *diabetes* untreated.
> So, now, you are berating us for not keeping out mouths shut rather than
> telling you how to cure your cat's diabetes?
>
> If you are looking for someone to blame, look to the incompetent
> veterinarian who missed the liver disease diagnosis (didn't s/he run blood
> work and see that the liver enzymes were all messed up? Doesn't take a
> rocket scientist). And for the record, many of us would have spent the
> money on all the pills for the liver disease, even if it meant eating
> beans for dinner for a month. If that wasn't your choice, it wasn't, but
> stop berating us as if your cat's liver disease is all our fault.
>
> Condolences to you and your wife on the loss of your kitty.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.
>
> --
> Charles Packer
> http://cpacker.org/whatnews
> mailboxATcpacker.org
>

This is an excellent post with good explanations of these medical
conditions. People on this group *did* answer the question (several times)
because the question related only to diabetes. We were never told about
liver disease. The OP is just looking for a way to tell his wife, "They
wouldn't help."

One of my cats had liver disease. It was diagnosed with her routine blood
tests. With aggressive treatment, she lived for another three years. When
it finally became clear that we could no longer sustain a quality of life
and that we would be prolonging her life only to cause pain, I made the very
difficult decision to have her euthanized.

I do offer my sympathies to the OP's wife. It sounds like she truly loved
this cat.

MaryL

Charles Packer
April 15th 08, 12:03 PM
On Apr 14, 9:58*am, "cindys" > wrote:
> rocket scientist). And for the record, many of us would have spent the money
> on all the pills for the liver disease, even if it meant eating beans for


Clearly.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

Phil P.
April 16th 08, 05:54 AM
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "cindys" >
> >
> >
> > Cindy why waste your time
> --------
> Hoping against hope that he'll do some introspection and rethink the way
he
> treats his wife. But I know it's probably a lost cause.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.

There's definitely a connection between domestic abuse and animal abuse:

*85 % of homes where women are abused, a pet is also abused.

*60% of women who are the victims of domestic violence have had a pet killed
by violence.

*40% of battered women delay going to a shelter for abused women because
they're afraid of what will happen to their pet if they leave.

Assholes like him are why I'm reluctant to adopt cats to women who are
married or have boyfriends but come into our adoption centers alone. I want
to meet both parties. I get into a lot arguments over it- but my reasons
definitely are not sexist.

Phil

dgk
April 17th 08, 01:14 PM
On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 13:00:44 -0400, "cindys"
> wrote:

>
>"Phil P." > wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>>
>> "cindys" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "Matthew" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> >
>>> > "cindys" >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > Cindy why waste your time
>>> --------
>>> Hoping against hope that he'll do some introspection and rethink the way
>> he
>>> treats his wife. But I know it's probably a lost cause.
>>> Best regards,
>>> ---Cindy S.
>>
>> There's definitely a connection between domestic abuse and animal abuse:
>>
>> *85 % of homes where women are abused, a pet is also abused.
>>
>> *60% of women who are the victims of domestic violence have had a pet
>> killed
>> by violence.
>>
>> *40% of battered women delay going to a shelter for abused women because
>> they're afraid of what will happen to their pet if they leave.
>>
>> Assholes like him are why I'm reluctant to adopt cats to women who are
>> married or have boyfriends but come into our adoption centers alone. I
>> want
>> to meet both parties. I get into a lot arguments over it- but my reasons
>> definitely are not sexist.
>-------
>My jaw dropped when I saw these statistics, but I don't find them
>surprising. My heart is bleeding, as I envision a woman who loved her cat
>desperately and would have treated his/her various illnesses if only she had
>the money, and a husband who refused to give her the money and forced her to
>have her beloved pet euthanized. My tears are for the woman more so than for
>the cat. The cat doesn't know the difference at this point, but the woman
>will be grieving for months.
>Best regards,
>---Cindy S.
>
Hopefully without living with the asshole.

April 18th 08, 02:57 PM
On Apr 8, 7:18 am, Charles Packer > wrote:
> On Apr 7, 7:35 am, "Spot" > wrote:
>
> > Its very critical that the cat get the correct dosage. Too much or too
> > little can kill the cat you need to work with your vet on this.
>
> What would have happened if that cat hadn't been treated at
> all? Except for a lot of drinking water and peeing, his behavior
> otherwise was normal. If his condition were fatal, at least
> we would have a memory of him as normal up to the end.
> But he's my wife's cat, and she decides what gets done.
>
> --
> Charles Packerhttp://cpacker.org/whatnews
> mailboxATcpacker.org

You should never ignore a cat's possible condition just because its
not "fatal" or they are acting normally.

Charles Packer
April 19th 08, 12:43 PM
On Apr 18, 9:57*am, wrote:
> You should never ignore a cat's possible condition just because its
> not "fatal" or they are acting normally.

Think about your choice of words here. If I had been
_ignoring_ the cat's condition, it never would have
occurred to me to post a query to this newsgroup,
right?

Sloppiness like that has derailed many a discussion
in newsgroups. To get this one back on a useful track,
I'd like to know: Have there been any peer-reviewed
studies of the success rate of the diabetes treatment
advocated in this thread?

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org

Phil P.
April 19th 08, 02:04 PM
"Charles Packer" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 18, 9:57 am, wrote:
> You should never ignore a cat's possible condition just because its
> not "fatal" or they are acting normally.

>Think about your choice of words here. If I had been
>_ignoring_ the cat's condition, it never would have
>occurred to me to post a query to this newsgroup,
>right?

Actually, it seemed to me like you came here looking for people to support
your position not to treat the cat. I didn't detect any genuine feelings or
concern for the cat- but that's me.


>Sloppiness like that has derailed many a discussion
>in newsgroups. To get this one back on a useful track,
>I'd like to know: Have there been any peer-reviewed
>studies of the success rate of the diabetes treatment
>advocated in this thread?


What do you consider "success"?

Success is bringing a diabetic cat's blood glucose levels into the normal
range and maintaining it- or driving the cat's diabetes into remission.
Cats whose diabetes is regulated but don't go into remission can still have
a good quality of life for many years. That's success to me.

Here's your study:

J Vet Intern Med. 2006 Mar-Apr;20(2):234-8.

Use of glargine and lente insulins in cats with diabetes mellitus.

Weaver KE, Rozanski EA, Mahony OM, Chan DL, Freeman LM.

Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine,
Tufts
University, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA.

The goals of this study were to compare the efficacy of once-daily
administered
Glargine insulin to twice-daily administered Lente insulin in cats with
diabetes
mellitus and to describe the use of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet
designed for the management of diabetes mellitus in cats. All cats with
naturally
occurring diabetes mellitus were eligible for inclusion. Baseline testing
included a physical examination, serum biochemistry, urinalysis and urine
culture, serum thyroxine concentration, and serum fructosamine
concentration. All
cats were fed the high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet exclusively. Cats were
randomized to receive either 0.5 U/kg Lente insulin q12h or 0.5 U/kg
Glargine
insulin q24h. Re-evaluations were performed on all cats at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8,
and
12, and included an assessment of clinical signs, physical examination,
16-hour
blood glucose curve, and serum fructosamine concentrations. Thirteen cats
completed the study (Lente, n = 7, Glargine, n = 6). There was significant
improvement in serum fructosamine and glucose concentrations in all cats but
there was no significant difference between the 2 insulin groups. Four of
the 13
cats were in complete remission by the end of the study period (Lente, n =
3;
Glargine, n = 1). The results of the study support the use of once-daily
insulin
Glargine or twice-daily Lente insulin in combination with a high-protein,
low-carbohydrate diet for treatment of feline diabetes mellitus.


PMID: 16594577 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]