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Ginni
April 8th 08, 11:47 AM
I have a recent addition to my home (4 year old girl that I got about
3 months ago), and she's shedding EVERYWHERE! It's not just because
it's Spring; she's been shedding tons since I got her (in the middle
of winter). She is an american shorthair, but seems to have a much
thicker coat than my "mutt" kitty. I no longer have bright clothing,
furniture, or carpet because the hair covers everything, and I've
noticed tumbleweed hairfluffs all over. I brush her almost daily, and
every time I get 3-4 large sized brushes FULL of hair (compressed so
much the prongs don't show through anymore), and I'm sure I could get
more but she gets tired of the brushing after that much. I try to
sweep/vacuum, but nothing can keep up with her shedding.

I changed her food to Eukanuba (better than what she was eating) when
I got her. Is 3 months enough to reduce shedding by getting her on a
better food? Does her thick hair mean she'll always shed this much?
Is there anything else I can do to reduce the shedding? I plan on
making SURE I brush her daily to help reduce it. I don't think there
is anything medically wrong, as she has been to the vet numerous times
(initial examination, another check-up, and then a spay). The vet
commented that she had a beautiful healthy coat and nothing seemed
wrong.

How, oh HOW, can I reduce this shedding?


Thanks in advance,
Ginni

Rene S.
April 8th 08, 02:12 PM
> I changed her food to Eukanuba (better than what she was eating) when
> I got her. *Is 3 months enough to reduce shedding by getting her on a
> better food? *Does her thick hair mean she'll always shed this much?
> Is there anything else I can do to reduce the shedding? *I plan on
> making SURE I brush her daily to help reduce it. *I don't think there
> is anything medically wrong, as she has been to the vet numerous times
> (initial examination, another check-up, and then a spay). *The vet
> commented that she had a beautiful healthy coat and nothing seemed
> wrong.

I am guessing you are feeding her dry food? I would consider switching
her to an all wet diet. I noticed a significant change in my cats' fur
when I took them off of dry food.

My guess is that you have several things going on: springtime, a
change in living conditions (it sounds like you adopted her, so she
may not have gotten much grooming before), and diet. You might also
consider something like a Furminator. I've owned many pet brushes
before, but this one really, really gets the fur out. Just read the
instructions carefully before use and don't press too hard while using
it.

MaryL
April 8th 08, 02:47 PM
"Ginni" > wrote in message
...
>I have a recent addition to my home (4 year old girl that I got about
> 3 months ago), and she's shedding EVERYWHERE! It's not just because
> it's Spring; she's been shedding tons since I got her (in the middle
> of winter). She is an american shorthair, but seems to have a much
> thicker coat than my "mutt" kitty. I no longer have bright clothing,
> furniture, or carpet because the hair covers everything, and I've
> noticed tumbleweed hairfluffs all over. I brush her almost daily, and
> every time I get 3-4 large sized brushes FULL of hair (compressed so
> much the prongs don't show through anymore), and I'm sure I could get
> more but she gets tired of the brushing after that much. I try to
> sweep/vacuum, but nothing can keep up with her shedding.
>
> I changed her food to Eukanuba (better than what she was eating) when
> I got her. Is 3 months enough to reduce shedding by getting her on a
> better food? Does her thick hair mean she'll always shed this much?
> Is there anything else I can do to reduce the shedding? I plan on
> making SURE I brush her daily to help reduce it. I don't think there
> is anything medically wrong, as she has been to the vet numerous times
> (initial examination, another check-up, and then a spay). The vet
> commented that she had a beautiful healthy coat and nothing seemed
> wrong.
>
> How, oh HOW, can I reduce this shedding?
>
>
> Thanks in advance,
> Ginni

I would "second" everything that Rene wrote. I noticed a remarkable
difference in Holly's coat after I made the change from free-feeding dry
food (what I thought was "good" dry food) to Wellness canned food. You
might want to consider adding EicosaDerm to your cat's diet (from DermaPet,
a concentrated source of Omega-3). Also, some cats will always shed more
than others, so there probably is no real "cure-all" in this case, but a
change in diet may help considerably.

Premium canned food is much better for a cat's health, even when the cat
appears to be in good condition at the time. Cats don't need carbs, and it
is a myth to think that dry food will somehow clean their teeth or protect
their gums.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

cybercat
April 8th 08, 06:15 PM
"Ginni" > wrote in message
...
>I have a recent addition to my home (4 year old girl that I got about
> 3 months ago), and she's shedding EVERYWHERE!

They shed a lot when they are anxious.


** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

CatNipped[_2_]
April 8th 08, 06:23 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Ginni" > wrote in message
> ...
>>I have a recent addition to my home (4 year old girl that I got about
>> 3 months ago), and she's shedding EVERYWHERE!
>
> They shed a lot when they are anxious.

Man, ain't that the truth! When Demi goes to the vet she leaves enough hair
behind to knit a kitten!

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
>
> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

cshenk
April 8th 08, 09:03 PM
"Ginni" wrote

>I have a recent addition to my home (4 year old girl that I got about
> 3 months ago), and she's shedding EVERYWHERE! It's not just because

Grin, been there. Got one like it. I see several recommend converting to
wet but all that's doing for me (on this issue, not long term health issues)
is making her hair a little thicker. One trick an old timer gave me was to
add a bit of fat to her diet. A little olive oil or bacon fat. This doesnt
so much reduce shedding, as make her fur ball problem go away and a higher
tendancy to self groom more of it off herself. I add this to her wet food.

I no longer need furball remedies (which I suspect are nothing more than cat
laxitives of a rough on the kitty sort).

mariib via CatKB.com
April 9th 08, 12:48 AM
cshenk wrote:
>>I have a recent addition to my home (4 year old girl that I got about
>> 3 months ago), and she's shedding EVERYWHERE! It's not just because
>
>One trick an old timer gave me was to
>add a bit of fat to her diet. A little olive oil or bacon fat. This doesnt
>so much reduce shedding, as make her fur ball problem go away and a higher
>tendancy to self groom more of it off herself. I add this to her wet food.
>
>I no longer need furball remedies (which I suspect are nothing more than cat
>laxitives of a rough on the kitty sort).

That old-timer's trick sounds quite familiar - a long time ago with my second
cat, a very long-haired fluffy white Maine Coon called Tommy, his hair also
covered everything at home. My late ex-DH was a DVM & was always insistent
that the cats be fed a variety of food brands, never kept on just 1 brand &
that I add a little oil to his diet every day for his coat & skin. My own
other solution in desperation was to shave Tommy down every couple months
with small animal clippers which didn't faze him the least because he was so
easy-going, friendly & calm. But I'm sure not all cats will tolerate the
noise of the clippers! Try adding some fat to her food & use the Furminator.
This tool really grabs large amounts of loose underhair, although my present
long-haired kitty Little Devil really dislikes it & it's difficult to use on
him as he attacks the tool & me as I try to pull it through his hair. M.
Here's a picture of Tommy with partially grown-in hair:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2608888580050028271ZMvdoj
& shortly after being shaved:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2425497350050028271GAZjTw

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

cshenk
April 9th 08, 04:08 AM
"mariib via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> cshenk wrote:
> http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2608888580050028271ZMvdoj
> & shortly after being shaved:
> http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2425497350050028271GAZjTw

Cool link! And i get to see bobcats there too!

Buddy's Mom
April 9th 08, 09:52 PM
The only other thing that I thought of is - was the kitty an outside
kitty before you adopted her? Maybe that made her coat extra thick
and thus all the shedding.

I adopted a Maine Coon from the shelter about 3 years ago and he eats
100 percent canned food - his shedding is not a big deal. A little at
this time of year and I comb him once a day, but I don't get more than
a teaspoon full out of him. I find a fine needled comb works better
than a brush at pulling out the loose hair.

If your kitty is nervous, that would also add to the shedding problem.

Ginni
April 10th 08, 04:31 PM
Wow!

Thanks for all of the advice! I will be going to get the furminator
this weekend, and I'm going to try to switch the girls to wet food.
The only reason I'm concerned about the wet food, is that I'm a
graduate student, and not always home at 12 hour intervals. I try to
be home as much as possible, but my schedule isn't always that
regular, and the girls are VERY picky about food. Would it be ok for
me to feed a wet food (Wellness seems to be the most popular "good"
wet food) at 12 hour intervals when possible, but still leave out dry
food just in case I can't get the wet food to them on time?

Stress seems to be the other factor. She was an indoor cat before I
got her, with about 40 other cats in a cattery. It seems she may be
having a little trouble adjusting to my first cat (Galt - who's spinal
injury is getting much better - for those of you who read that post).
Galt is aggressive, and can be intimidating to Dagny, who is very shy
and skittish. Dagny is becoming more comfortable around Galt
(partially because of Galt's immobility). How can I reduce her stress
further?

Thanks,
Ginni

cshenk
April 10th 08, 04:48 PM
"Ginni" wrote

> wet food) at 12 hour intervals when possible, but still leave out dry
> food just in case I can't get the wet food to them on time?

How about putting a little dry out when you know you will be late? Most of
the time you probably know in advance right?

> Galt is aggressive, and can be intimidating to Dagny, who is very shy
> and skittish. Dagny is becoming more comfortable around Galt
> (partially because of Galt's immobility). How can I reduce her stress
> further?

She's probably got a spot she likes to hide in more than others right? Try
putting a small water dish there, just for her. Let her hide as she wants
for now. She'll come out when ready.

This is the same as how we worked with Daisy and she's all over the house
now, even in daytime. No more gate up keeping Cash (the beagle mix) out of
'her room' (except when she's getting her wet food).

Ginni
April 10th 08, 05:05 PM
Dagny doesn't really hide.... She just darts off if I move too fast, or
if I walk too close to her while she's relaxing, or even if there is a
loud/unfamiliar noise. She often naps upstairs, where Galt is not
fond of. Although when I am at home, she comes downstairs to greet me
and get brushed/petted for a couple of hours. She has a separate food
and water dish. There has never been an issue over food or water, but
I just wanted to let her feel like she has her own "space" and not let
Galt think that Dagny is taking over. I'm not sure that it is even
really anxiety, as much as it is her personality.

Rene S.
April 10th 08, 09:19 PM
> Thanks for all of the advice! *I will be going to get the furminator
> this weekend, and I'm going to try to switch the girls to wet food.
> The only reason I'm concerned about the wet food, is that I'm a
> graduate student, and not always home at 12 hour intervals. *I try to
> be home as much as possible, but my schedule isn't always that
> regular, and the girls are VERY picky about food. *Would it be ok for
> me to feed a wet food (Wellness seems to be the most popular "good"
> wet food) at 12 hour intervals when possible, but still leave out dry
> food just in case I can't get the wet food to them on time?

You don't need to leave out any dry food. If you are off an hour or
two, it's ok. Cats in the wild don't eat throughout the day, and don't
need to graze. Once they get used to the new feeding schedule, they
will adjust.

As for the stress, have you thought about using Rescue Remedy? It's a
Bach herbal remedy that's completely safe. You can put a few drops in
their water (or I've even put it in their food). For more info, go to
www.rescueremedyc.om

Buddy's Mom
April 10th 08, 10:08 PM
What about getting Feliway? Try searching this group for it. We've
talked about it a lot in the past. It seemed to calm down some ferals
I was caring for last year.