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-Lost
May 17th 08, 07:31 AM
Any special care tips for a declawed cat? Sensitive toes normal?

Our newest addition to the family has had his front toes removed
(yeah, declawed, but we all know what that means).

He seems to be really sensitive about them and I am not sure if there
is any real problem or if I am over thinking things a bit.

The only time it seems to bother him is if I am touching the tips
where his claws would normally be retracted or extend from.

Yes, I know -- stop touching them then. I did it once on accident, a
second time to verify the suspected behavior/result, and a third time
to confirm. Each time he placed his mouth on me fully (not a nip, he
opened wide), but left nothing more than a bit of saliva.

The veterinary technician said it is normal for there to be
sensitivity and I realize scar tissue can be sensitive forever, but
still. Any concerns I should be aware of?

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-L.
May 17th 08, 07:39 AM
On May 16, 11:31 pm, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Any special care tips for a declawed cat? Sensitive toes normal?
>
> Our newest addition to the family has had his front toes removed
> (yeah, declawed, but we all know what that means).
>
> He seems to be really sensitive about them and I am not sure if there
> is any real problem or if I am over thinking things a bit.
>
> The only time it seems to bother him is if I am touching the tips
> where his claws would normally be retracted or extend from.
>
> Yes, I know -- stop touching them then. I did it once on accident, a
> second time to verify the suspected behavior/result, and a third time
> to confirm. Each time he placed his mouth on me fully (not a nip, he
> opened wide), but left nothing more than a bit of saliva.
>
> The veterinary technician said it is normal for there to be
> sensitivity and I realize scar tissue can be sensitive forever, but
> still. Any concerns I should be aware of?
>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

How long ago was the cat declawed?

Keep an eye out for regrowth - which can occur even years later.
Also, If surgical glue was used to seal the wounds, the glue can
become encased in tissue and form granulomas which may or may not
surface over time.

Also, kitty may not want to use the litter box due to pain in his
feet. (If he was surrendered to a shelter, this is probably the most
likely reason why...)

Poor kitty. :(

-L.

-Lost
May 17th 08, 08:05 AM
Response to "-L." >:

Hi, Lyn. Thanks for taking the time out to assist me in lieu of
your loss. I greatly appreciate it.

> How long ago was the cat declawed?

I have NO clue. He came to us a couple of weeks ago as a stray.

> Keep an eye out for regrowth - which can occur even years later.

Gotcha! Although this worries me a bit. I imagine the only way to
handle regrowth would be another horrible visit to attempt to have it
removed again?

> Also, If surgical glue was used to seal the wounds, the glue can
> become encased in tissue and form granulomas which may or may not
> surface over time.

How might one check for this? A checkup for that specific purpose?

> Also, kitty may not want to use the litter box due to pain in his
> feet. (If he was surrendered to a shelter, this is probably the
> most likely reason why...)

He does not appear to be in any discomfort -- ever -- unless of
course I purposely go for the tips of his toes.

In fact he paws constantly as if he is scratching, but to no avail.
In the litter box, on doors, on the couch, on me... ; )

> Poor kitty. :(

Indeed.

Thanks again.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-L.
May 17th 08, 08:45 AM
On May 17, 12:05 am, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response to "-L." >:
>
> Hi, Lyn. Thanks for taking the time out to assist me in lieu of
> your loss. I greatly appreciate it.

You're welcome.

<snip>

> Gotcha! Although this worries me a bit. I imagine the only way to
> handle regrowth would be another horrible visit to attempt to have it
> removed again?

Yes. In general, the bones grow crooked and grow out the tip of the
toes - it's pretty gross. What you will notice is a knob-like growth
at the tip - either growing up or out. It will look like a deformed
toenail.

>
> > Also, If surgical glue was used to seal the wounds, the glue can
> > become encased in tissue and form granulomas which may or may not
> > surface over time.
>
> How might one check for this? A checkup for that specific purpose?

No - it would be a sore on the toe...it would look like an open wound
that wouldn't heal. Just inspect his feet every month or so to make
sure they are healthy.


<snip>

>
> He does not appear to be in any discomfort -- ever -- unless of
> course I purposely go for the tips of his toes.
>
> In fact he paws constantly as if he is scratching, but to no avail.
> In the litter box, on doors, on the couch, on me... ; )

That's a good sign. Be aware that as he ages, he is prone to
arthritis in the joints of the forelegs, shoulder and spine (assuming
he is a front-only declaw).

>
> > Poor kitty. :(
>
> Indeed.
>
> Thanks again.

No prob. His sensitivity sounds pretty normal at this point.

-L.

cshenk
May 17th 08, 05:47 PM
"-Lost" wrote
> Response to "-L." >:
>
> Hi, Lyn. Thanks for taking the time out to assist me in lieu of
> your loss. I greatly appreciate it.
>
>> How long ago was the cat declawed?
>
> I have NO clue. He came to us a couple of weeks ago as a stray.

Understood.

>> Keep an eye out for regrowth - which can occur even years later.
>
> Gotcha! Although this worries me a bit. I imagine the only way to
> handle regrowth would be another horrible visit to attempt to have it
> removed again?

Vet visit for sure. Had to have a botched job fixed on 2 fully declawed
(front and back) kitties we rescued years ago.

>> become encased in tissue and form granulomas which may or may not
>> surface over time.
>
> How might one check for this? A checkup for that specific purpose?

When you get next to the vet, have him/her carefully check the toes. I
suspect though there is no severe problem as:

> He does not appear to be in any discomfort -- ever -- unless of
> course I purposely go for the tips of his toes.
> In fact he paws constantly as if he is scratching, but to no avail.
> In the litter box, on doors, on the couch, on me... ; )

Now, this can change if the kitty develops a problem or they try to grow
back. They will not, from my understanding, grow back 'normally' and will
be painful if they start to try to come back. You'll have to have the bones
re-trimmed if so for the cats comfort. I don't think it happens very often
though.

-Lost
May 20th 08, 05:08 AM
Response to hopitus >:

> On reading, looks like you're wanting *short-term* advice; mine is
> *long-term*
> don't let him outside unless you are right there with him to
> actively watch him.
> He is now defenseless from several standpoints.
> Lyn, Matt mentioned your recent loss of an old girl; please accept
> my heartfelt
> sympathy and condolences for this sad happening.

Sorry, didn't mean to give you that impression. Phat Kat, the
declawed kitty is named after a fellow newsgrouper who's big kitty I
always called "fat cat."

He's fitting in well and handling the acclamation process to and
with Gabby -- our mean-spirited but wonderfully loving altered male.

Long story short -- he's here to stay.

Thanks for your advice.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

-Lost
May 20th 08, 05:09 AM
Response to "cshenk" >:

<snip>

> When you get next to the vet, have him/her carefully check the
> toes. I suspect though there is no severe problem as:
>
>> He does not appear to be in any discomfort -- ever -- unless of
>> course I purposely go for the tips of his toes.
>> In fact he paws constantly as if he is scratching, but to no
>> avail. In the litter box, on doors, on the couch, on me... ; )
>
> Now, this can change if the kitty develops a problem or they try
> to grow back. They will not, from my understanding, grow back
> 'normally' and will be painful if they start to try to come back.
> You'll have to have the bones re-trimmed if so for the cats
> comfort. I don't think it happens very often though.

I will definitely keep an eye on it. Thanks for the advice.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.