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Susan \(CobbersMom\)
May 24th 08, 06:02 PM
Picked up a foster cat a couple days ago with 5 day old kittens. The snap
test showed positive for giardia. I've dealt with this before in orphaned
kittens I've raised but not in a nursing mom. The vet put up Metronidazole
suspension, once daily for eight days. The protocal in the past has been to
treat for 30, 60 or even 90 days depending on how resistant the giardia is.
My first concern is that he didn't prescribe this nearly long enough.
Second is that Metronidazole is contraindicated in nursing moms. Saunders
vet manual and good internet sites all recommend not treating the mom until
the kittens are done nursing. Not looking for an answer here, just voicing
concerns but would like to hear your opinions if you have experience in
this. I used to be a vet tech and worked for this guy, whom I don't quite
trust. Will be contacting him next week to discuss the concerns. I
received the foster cat thru someone else at the vets office who decided she
didn't want the giardia in her house (young kids and all) so I haven't had
direct contact with the vet yet. Thanks,
Sue
Minocqua, WI
Yamaha '00 VStar 650
'04 TW200 (mud = fun)
Kawasaki '95 Vulcan 1500 V#15937

A crow has seven pinion feathers at the ends of his wings and a raven has
eight. Therefore the difference between a crow and a raven is a matter of a
pinion.

-L.
May 26th 08, 09:28 AM
On May 24, 10:02 am, "Susan \(CobbersMom\)" >
wrote:
> Picked up a foster cat a couple days ago with 5 day old kittens. The snap
> test showed positive for giardia. I've dealt with this before in orphaned
> kittens I've raised but not in a nursing mom. The vet put up Metronidazole
> suspension, once daily for eight days. The protocal in the past has been to
> treat for 30, 60 or even 90 days depending on how resistant the giardia is.
> My first concern is that he didn't prescribe this nearly long enough.
> Second is that Metronidazole is contraindicated in nursing moms. Saunders
> vet manual and good internet sites all recommend not treating the mom until
> the kittens are done nursing. Not looking for an answer here, just voicing
> concerns but would like to hear your opinions if you have experience in
> this. I used to be a vet tech and worked for this guy, whom I don't quite
> trust. Will be contacting him next week to discuss the concerns. I
> received the foster cat thru someone else at the vets office who decided she
> didn't want the giardia in her house (young kids and all) so I haven't had
> direct contact with the vet yet. Thanks,
> Sue


Unless the cat is really sick from the Giardia, I'd wait to treat her
until the kittens are weaned. They will have to be treated as well,
which can't happen until they are 12 weeks, IIRC.

Good luck.

Susan \(CobbersMom\)
May 27th 08, 02:17 AM
"-L." <> wrote in message > Unless the cat is really sick from the Giardia,
I'd wait to treat her
> until the kittens are weaned. They will have to be treated as well,>
> which can't happen until they are 12 weeks, IIRC.> > Good luck.

Thanks for the reply. Yesterday all hell (diarrhea) broke loose. The cat
couldn't even walk around without diarrhea spilling out - on the floor,
bedding and on the kittens. Even picking her up it would just pour out. I
contacted the first foster home (girl from vet office). She agreed to meet
me at the vets and put the cat and her kittens into the isolation room. One
of the vets was there working on an emergency and I told him how bad off she
was. Hopefully they will keep a good eye on her and get this under control.
Sue
Minocqua, WI
Yamaha '00 VStar 650
'04 TW200 (mud = fun)
Kawasaki '95 Vulcan 1500 V#15937

A crow has seven pinion feathers at the ends of his wings and a raven has
eight. Therefore the difference between a crow and a raven is a matter of a
pinion.