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Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 05:08 PM
The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
previously used on the cat.

I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
caught anything from the incident?

Lynne
June 21st 08, 05:25 PM
Richard Evans wrote:
> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
> previously used on the cat.
>
> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
> caught anything from the incident?

why are you reusing lancets??

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 06:23 PM
Lynne > wrote:

>Richard Evans wrote:
>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> previously used on the cat.
>>
>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> caught anything from the incident?
>
>why are you reusing lancets??

Because that's been my practice for over ten years. Most diabetics
change lancets once or twice a year , if that.

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 06:26 PM
"Matthew" > wrote:

>crossposting removed
>
>OMG YOU NEED TO GO TO THE HOSPITAL RIGHT NOW
>YOU HAVE CAUGHT A VERY TERRIBLE DISEASE
>
>Can you figure out what it is if not I am sure while the ER staff is
>laughing at you
>
>Why in the heck are you reusing lancets they are the most cheapest thing in
>a diabetic kit and once you use them they become blunt

You guys aren't diabetics, are you? Diabetics change lancets maybe
twice a year, if that. The cat gets no better treatment than I give
myself. I've personally used the same lancet literally a thousand
times, and it never became noticeably blunt.

Lynne
June 21st 08, 06:36 PM
Richard Evans wrote:
> "Matthew" > wrote:
>
>> crossposting removed
>>
>> OMG YOU NEED TO GO TO THE HOSPITAL RIGHT NOW
>> YOU HAVE CAUGHT A VERY TERRIBLE DISEASE
>>
>> Can you figure out what it is if not I am sure while the ER staff is
>> laughing at you
>>
>> Why in the heck are you reusing lancets they are the most cheapest thing in
>> a diabetic kit and once you use them they become blunt
>
> You guys aren't diabetics, are you? Diabetics change lancets maybe
> twice a year, if that. The cat gets no better treatment than I give
> myself. I've personally used the same lancet literally a thousand
> times, and it never became noticeably blunt.

Uh, I test my blood sugar sometimes as much as 10 times per day. I never
reuse lancets.

Are you misusing terminology?? The lancet is the actual needle, not the
thing that holds it. I'm pretty sure that is called a lancet holder.
Lancets are CHEAP and meant to be used ONE TIME.

Michelle C
June 21st 08, 07:31 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
> previously used on the cat.
>
> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
> caught anything from the incident?

Hi Richard,

I'm just guessing, but I doubt that you can get anything harmful from your
cat's lancet. Most things people worry about catching from their cat
include ringworm (direct contact with skin), toxoplasmosis (from feces) and
cat scratch fever (method of transmission obvious--cat scratch). I imagine
being a family pet that it's unlikely your cat has any of these things, and
none of them have to do with blood. According to a little googling, the
blood diseases that may be carried by a cat--feline leukemia and feline
immunodeficiency virus--cannot be transmitted to humans.
--
Best regards,
Michelle C., T2
diet & exercise
BMI 21.5

Julie Bove
June 21st 08, 08:09 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
> previously used on the cat.
>
> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
> caught anything from the incident?

Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would lancet me
with her teeth and claws if I tried it.

Julie Bove
June 21st 08, 08:10 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> Richard Evans wrote:
>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> previously used on the cat.
>>
>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> caught anything from the incident?
>
> why are you reusing lancets??

Most people do. No need to use a fresh one. They are more painful. Only
use a fresh one if you are lancing someone else.

Spot[_2_]
June 21st 08, 09:03 PM
Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO NOT
reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told him
I was reusing lancelets.

Celeste

"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> Lynne > wrote:
>
>>Richard Evans wrote:
>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>
>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>
>>why are you reusing lancets??
>
> Because that's been my practice for over ten years. Most diabetics
> change lancets once or twice a year , if that.
>

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 21st 08, 09:50 PM
"Spot" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO
> NOT reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
> sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
> And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told
> him I was reusing lancelets.

It's your own blood, where does the infection come from? It is perfectly
safe to reuse lancets as long as they are your own. I change mine maybe
once a week. If you use a alcohol swab you can always clean it before use.
They do get dull after a while and you can always tell because you can feel
it.

Paul

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 21st 08, 09:51 PM
"Julie Bove" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
> ...
>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> previously used on the cat.
>>
>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> caught anything from the incident?
>
> Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
> lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would lancet
> me with her teeth and claws if I tried it.

They take the blood from the ears.

Paul

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 10:57 PM
"Spot" > wrote:

>Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO NOT
>reuse a lancelet.

I've been on alt.support.diabetes and every time the subject comes up
the consensus is that reuse is common.

Care to start a separate thread and see what responses you get?


> You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
>sooner or later.

Nothing yet after probably ten thousand sticks. I'll take my chances.


>And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told him
>I was reusing lancelets.

Then don't tell him.

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 10:59 PM
hopitus > wrote:

>>
>> >>why are you reusing lancets??
>>
>> > Because that's been my practice for over ten years. Most diabetics
>> > change lancets once or twice a year , if that.
>
>Heh...is your doc living on S.S.? And how do YOU know what "most
>diabetics"
>do?

Based on repeated threads on alt.support.diabetes over many years.

>Please read last sentence of my other post here. Who are YOU to
>jump
>on this dude. No one is landing on you for what you choose to do.

Uh, yes, they are. So far, nobody has answered my question, just
ragged on me for reuising lancets.

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 11:01 PM
"Michelle C" > wrote:

>
>"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> previously used on the cat.
>>
>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> caught anything from the incident?
>
>Hi Richard,
>
>I'm just guessing, but I doubt that you can get anything harmful from your
>cat's lancet. Most things people worry about catching from their cat
>include ringworm (direct contact with skin), toxoplasmosis (from feces) and
>cat scratch fever (method of transmission obvious--cat scratch). I imagine
>being a family pet that it's unlikely your cat has any of these things, and
>none of them have to do with blood. According to a little googling, the
>blood diseases that may be carried by a cat--feline leukemia and feline
>immunodeficiency virus--cannot be transmitted to humans.

Thanks. According to a friend who is a vet tech, there is virtually no
chance. It had been twelve hours since the lancet was last used and
nothing contagious survives in the air that long.

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 11:05 PM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote:

>
>"Julie Bove" > wrote in message
...
>>
>> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>
>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>
>> Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
>> lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would lancet
>> me with her teeth and claws if I tried it.
>
>They take the blood from the ears.

That's the short answer. The longer answer: It takes two of us to do
it. My wife holds him firmly. I massage his ear from the base towards
the tip to force blood to the edge of the year. I then insert my thumb
with the nail backing the ear, and poke near the edge with the lancet.
I'm getting so I can get blood on the first try most of the time. I
would not be able to do it unassisted.

Google on anything to do with diabetic cats or checking cat's sugar.
There are lots of good sites describing alternate procdures.
>
>Paul
>

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 21st 08, 11:07 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> "Michelle C" > wrote:
>
>>
>>"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>
>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>
>>Hi Richard,
>>
>>I'm just guessing, but I doubt that you can get anything harmful from your
>>cat's lancet. Most things people worry about catching from their cat
>>include ringworm (direct contact with skin), toxoplasmosis (from feces)
>>and
>>cat scratch fever (method of transmission obvious--cat scratch). I
>>imagine
>>being a family pet that it's unlikely your cat has any of these things,
>>and
>>none of them have to do with blood. According to a little googling, the
>>blood diseases that may be carried by a cat--feline leukemia and feline
>>immunodeficiency virus--cannot be transmitted to humans.
>
> Thanks. According to a friend who is a vet tech, there is virtually no
> chance. It had been twelve hours since the lancet was last used and
> nothing contagious survives in the air that long.

I can only think of blood parasites that would be transmittable and that
would be one heck of a stretch at that given the device used. Viruses etc,
are not communicable between humans and cats. If they were, we'd all be in
deep doo doo.

Paul

Richard Evans
June 21st 08, 11:08 PM
Lynne > wrote:

>
>Uh, I test my blood sugar sometimes as much as 10 times per day. I never
>reuse lancets.

Your choice.

>
>Are you misusing terminology?? The lancet is the actual needle, not the
>thing that holds it.

I mean the needle.

> I'm pretty sure that is called a lancet holder.
>Lancets are CHEAP and meant to be used ONE TIME.

So are syringes, but many commonly reuse them. I use mine until they
get too dull to pierce the membrane on the vial.

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 21st 08, 11:34 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> Lynne > wrote:
>
>>
>>Uh, I test my blood sugar sometimes as much as 10 times per day. I never
>>reuse lancets.
>
> Your choice.
>
>>
>>Are you misusing terminology?? The lancet is the actual needle, not the
>>thing that holds it.
>
> I mean the needle.
>
>> I'm pretty sure that is called a lancet holder.
>>Lancets are CHEAP and meant to be used ONE TIME.
>
> So are syringes, but many commonly reuse them. I use mine until they
> get too dull to pierce the membrane on the vial.

I reuse my Byetta needles all the time. I use a fresh one about every 5
days. I just dip them in rubbing alcohol first to be cautious since I store
the pen in the fridge.

Paul

W. Baker
June 21st 08, 11:35 PM
In alt.support.diabetes Richard Evans > wrote:
: The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
: day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
: preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
: lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
: previously used on the cat.

: I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
: caught anything from the incident?

Well, if you start to prowl at night and start to grow whiskers, I would
begin to worry:-)

Wendy

Alan S[_2_]
June 21st 08, 11:57 PM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 20:03:31 GMT, "Spot"
> wrote:

>Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO NOT
>reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
>sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
>And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told him
>I was reusing lancelets.
>
>Celeste

Celeste, I can only presume you are writing from
rec.pets.cats.health+behav. To see what other diabetics are
doing you might find it valuable to come on over and join us
at alt.support.diabetes. I doubt that you can speak for even
a small number of diabetics, let alone most diabetics.

First, you might find this old thread worth reading:
http://tinyurl.com/42eyrs or
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.health.diabetes/browse_frm/thread/3d3b96fdb9ca3998/4349ec14d50e5608?hl=en&tvc=1#4349ec14d50e5608

I usually only change lancets when I test someone else or
when I notice it's getting a bit dull. Over the past six
years and 6000+ tests I've bought one pack of 100 and
received another 30 with new meters; I doubt I'll need to
buy any more before I go to the old folks home.

I've never had any infection as a result - and I also have
hypogammaglobulinemia, which means that if infection was a
possibility I would almost certainly get it.


Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

Alan S[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 12:00 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 12:08:15 -0400, Richard Evans
> wrote:

>The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>previously used on the cat.
>
>I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>caught anything from the incident?

Most unlikely, unless the cat has something evil.

If you find yourself compelled to follow the fish-monger's
truck down the street and to spit and snarl at passing dogs,
seek a more professional opinion.

Incidentally, rinsing with soap and water and possibly a
little disinfectant or 3% peroxide would be of more value
than rinsing with alcohol.


Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

Dick Ballard
June 22nd 08, 12:06 AM
Me too, cat & I are both diabetic. Also reuse lancets in both cases.
Separate glucose meters & lancets for me & cat. Stuck myself a couple
of times with the cat's lancet, also once with his insulin needle. In
both cases very little penetration. Nothing bad happening yet - that I
know of!

Dick Ballard



On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 12:08:15 -0400, Richard Evans
> wrote:

>The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>previously used on the cat.
>
>I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>caught anything from the incident?

Alan S[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 12:21 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:16:09 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
> wrote:

>My sugar range is always less than 200. I have
>other health concerns than Type 2..

Many of us have other health concerns. But high BG's can
exacerbate those too.

I can only speak for myself, but you'd be very welcome to
drop in on a.s.d. I believe we could possibly help you
improve those numbers without jeopardising those other
concerns.

This may interest you:
http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045678.php


Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

Lynne
June 22nd 08, 01:12 AM
Paul M. Cook wrote:

> It's your own blood, where does the infection come from? It is perfectly
> safe to reuse lancets as long as they are your own. I change mine maybe
> once a week. If you use a alcohol swab you can always clean it before use.
> They do get dull after a while and you can always tell because you can feel
> it.
>
> Paul

Very interesting. I never would have thought this would be okay, but
after reading the old threads on asd, I may just start reusing mine as
well. It wouldn't be about money, but about lessening my environmental
impact just a little bit.

I'm new to all this so this may be a dumb question, but that's never
stopped me before: are there any recycling options for lancets? It
always bugs me to toss them, and so many of them.

Julie Bove
June 22nd 08, 03:06 AM
"Spot" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO
> NOT reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
> sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
> And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told
> him I was reusing lancelets.

Actually, most DO reuse them. From what I have read, most reuse needles as
well. I don't reuse the needles because I had a bad experience when I did
so. Might have been a coincidence, but I don't want to repeat it. My Dr.
knows I reuse lancets. So does the nurse. She saw me reuse it and didn't
say anything. You are not letting yourself in for an infection by reusing
if reusing only on yourself.

Julie Bove
June 22nd 08, 03:08 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Julie Bove" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>
>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>
>> Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
>> lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would lancet
>> me with her teeth and claws if I tried it.
>
> They take the blood from the ears.

That's what somebody else told me. But wouldn't that pierce the ears? The
other guy said he never tests his cat at home but takes the cat to the vet
every couple of months for a test.

Julie Bove
June 22nd 08, 03:10 AM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote:
>
>>
>>"Julie Bove" > wrote in message
...
>>>
>>> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>>
>>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>>
>>> Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
>>> lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would lancet
>>> me with her teeth and claws if I tried it.
>>
>>They take the blood from the ears.
>
> That's the short answer. The longer answer: It takes two of us to do
> it. My wife holds him firmly. I massage his ear from the base towards
> the tip to force blood to the edge of the year. I then insert my thumb
> with the nail backing the ear, and poke near the edge with the lancet.
> I'm getting so I can get blood on the first try most of the time. I
> would not be able to do it unassisted.
>
> Google on anything to do with diabetic cats or checking cat's sugar.
> There are lots of good sites describing alternate procdures.

Wow. Maui had some excess ear wax and she wouldn't let me take that out.
When she was a kitten, she had ear mites. I got scratched to pieces trying
to put the drops in her ears. The vet finally gave her a shot that was
intended for a dog. Knocked the mites right out and she has never had a
problem since. Not with that anyway...

Tiger_Lily
June 22nd 08, 03:29 AM
Spot wrote:
> Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO NOT
> reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
> sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
> And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told him
> I was reusing lancelets.
>
> Celeste

where the heck have YOU been, Celeste

i reuse my lancet until St Swithin's Day, when someone posts it's
occurance here in order to remind us to change our lancet

do a google group search for St Swithin's Day, i'm sure it's been posted
for the last 6 years............... i also know that in 1999 when i came
to the newsgroups, i discovered that you CAN reuse a lancet

i bet you use alcohol to wipe the area where you are giving an insulin
injection as well

--
kate
type 1 since 1987
www.diabetic-chat.org
www.diabetic-talk.org
http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/newly%20diagnosed.html

MaryL
June 22nd 08, 03:36 AM
"Spot" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO
> NOT reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
> sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
> And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told
> him I was reusing lancelets.
>
> Celeste
>
>
I also reuse mine. Every diabetic I know does the same thing. It's not to
save money (they're very inexpensive, even for people on limited budgets --
the expense is in the strips). However, it's much more convenient to simply
reuse the lancets, and I have never heard of any problems doing this. It's
not at all the same thing as reusing a needle (which should *never* be
done). I would never use a lancet that anyone else had used (or let anyone
else use mine), but I don't hesitate to reuse my own. I use a single lancet
for about three months. It's start to change if lancing starts to hurt
because that's a sign that the lancet is getting dull. I do use an alcohol
swab on the lancing site (but not on the lancet itself) both before and
after lancing, but many people do not even do that. I suspect the OP will
not have any problems with the cat's lancet that he used, either, but I
certainly would not recommend it -- and I would want to call my doctor and
inquire about that. Incidentally, I don't even let anyone else use my
glucometer because I load all of my readings onto my computer and take that
to the doctor. Therefore, I don't want anyone else's readings to be mingled
with my own.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

Richard Evans
June 22nd 08, 04:05 AM
"Julie Bove" > wrote:

>
>"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>>
>> "Julie Bove" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>>
>>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>>
>>> Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
>>> lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would lancet
>>> me with her teeth and claws if I tried it.
>>
>> They take the blood from the ears.
>
>That's what somebody else told me. But wouldn't that pierce the ears?

Depends on how deep you set the injector.

>The other guy said he never tests his cat at home but takes the cat to the vet
>every couple of months for a test.

Our old guy is quite brittle now and we test (and inject insulin)
twice a day. We are hoping to get him stabilized soon so we don't have
to test so often, but a couple of weeks ago we gave him his nighttime
shot without testing and he nearly died. The next morning he was
unconscious and his BG was 20. He was within an hour of being
euthanized, but he rallied, so we keep on keeping on.
>

Julie Bove
June 22nd 08, 04:15 AM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> "Julie Bove" > wrote:
>
>>
>>"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>>
>>> "Julie Bove" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>>
>>>> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>>>
>>>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>>>
>>>> Oh wow! I don't know what the chances are, but how in the heck do you
>>>> lancet a cat? I know mine would never sit still for it and would
>>>> lancet
>>>> me with her teeth and claws if I tried it.
>>>
>>> They take the blood from the ears.
>>
>>That's what somebody else told me. But wouldn't that pierce the ears?
>
> Depends on how deep you set the injector.
>
>>The other guy said he never tests his cat at home but takes the cat to
>>the vet
>>every couple of months for a test.
>
> Our old guy is quite brittle now and we test (and inject insulin)
> twice a day. We are hoping to get him stabilized soon so we don't have
> to test so often, but a couple of weeks ago we gave him his nighttime
> shot without testing and he nearly died. The next morning he was
> unconscious and his BG was 20. He was within an hour of being
> euthanized, but he rallied, so we keep on keeping on.

Oh *sniff* the poor thing!

zob
June 22nd 08, 04:56 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 17:59:38 -0400, Richard Evans
> wrote:

>hopitus > wrote:
>
>>>
>>> >>why are you reusing lancets??
>>>
>>> > Because that's been my practice for over ten years. Most diabetics
>>> > change lancets once or twice a year , if that.
>>
>>Heh...is your doc living on S.S.? And how do YOU know what "most
>>diabetics"
>>do?
>
>Based on repeated threads on alt.support.diabetes over many years.
>
>>Please read last sentence of my other post here. Who are YOU to
>>jump
>>on this dude. No one is landing on you for what you choose to do.
>
>Uh, yes, they are. So far, nobody has answered my question, just
>ragged on me for reuising lancets.
>

I don't have your answer, but I will say that I certainly re-use my
lancets until they become dull. It's ignorant for anyone to say that
you're going to give yourself diseases by reusing your own Lancet!
They must work for the company that sells them -- or are believing the
propaganda that they put out.

It's exactly like the way that the Littermaid company says to replace
the receptacle when it gets full and needs emptying. I change it
about once every 3 months when it wears out. There's no money for the
company in my doing that -- and there's no money for the company in
re-using BG test lancets - but that doesn't mean it's not perfectly
OK to do it. Noteverybody is independently wealthy and has the choice
of throwing away perfectly good re-usable items.
---
Zob

Alan S[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 05:10 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:27:02 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
> wrote:

>On Jun 21, 5:21 pm, Alan S > wrote:
>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:16:09 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
>>
>> > wrote:
>> >My sugar range is always less than 200. I have
>> >other health concerns than Type 2..
>>
>> Many of us have other health concerns. But high BG's can
>> exacerbate those too.
>>
>> I can only speak for myself, but you'd be very welcome to
>> drop in on a.s.d. I believe we could possibly help you
>> improve those numbers without jeopardising those other
>> concerns.
>>
>> This may interest you:http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045678.php
>>
>> Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
>> --
>> d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
>> Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.comhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/http://loraltravel.blogspot.com(On Indian Roads)
>
>Why, thank you for the unexpected invitation, mate (nod to Oz)
>your llink seemed most informative and I will investigate your
>referrals. Someone I am very fond of in another ng I post to
>lives in Oz someplace near Sydney but not right there.
>G'Day.

See you when you get here:-)

Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

John[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 07:00 AM
"Lynne" > wrote


> why are you reusing lancets??

You're kidding, right?

John C.

John[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 07:06 AM
"Spot" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Where the heck have you been..........................Most diabetics DO
> NOT reuse a lancelet. You are letting yourself wide open for an infection
> sooner or later. Beside lancelets are the cheapest part don't be stupid.
> And yes I am diabetic my doctor would smack me upside the head if I told
> him I was reusing lancelets.
>
> Celeste

You doc would have a big problem with me. After the smack in the head, he'd
probably be unhappy with the result which would include a nasty contusion.
(his contusion, BTW). I reuse lancets (understatement of the year) and have
never had one problem. So why is it you feel you have to use a new lancet
for every stick? Because your doctor told you so? Do you also pack yourself
full of carbs because the dietician "told you so"

John c.

John[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 07:09 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote

> It's your own blood, where does the infection come from? It is perfectly
> safe to reuse lancets as long as they are your own. I change mine maybe
> once a week. If you use a alcohol swab you can always clean it before
> use. They do get dull after a while and you can always tell because you
> can feel it.
>
> Paul

Once a week! Sometimes I'll literally go months and net feel any difference.

John C.

John[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 07:14 AM
"Tiger_Lily" > wrote

> i bet you use alcohol to wipe the area where you are giving an insulin
> injection as well

heheh, used to do that too.

I do, however thoroughly wash my hands before I test. Not too worried about
infection, it's more about contaminantsskewing the BG result.

John C.

Oleg Lego
June 22nd 08, 07:55 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 19:08:46 -0700 (PDT), hopitus posted:

>On Jun 21, 6:12 pm, Lynne > wrote:
>> Paul M. Cook wrote:
>> > It's your own blood, where does the infection come from? It is perfectly
>> > safe to reuse lancets as long as they are your own. I change mine maybe
>> > once a week. If you use a alcohol swab you can always clean it before use.
>> > They do get dull after a while and you can always tell because you can feel
>> > it.
>>
>> > Paul
>>
>> Very interesting. I never would have thought this would be okay, but
>> after reading the old threads on asd, I may just start reusing mine as
>> well. It wouldn't be about money, but about lessening my environmental
>> impact just a little bit.
>>
>> I'm new to all this so this may be a dumb question, but that's never
>> stopped me before: are there any recycling options for lancets? It
>> always bugs me to toss them, and so many of them.
>
>Former hospital worker here can tell you that used needles, which is
>the nearest item to "lancets" (maybe they call them that because the
>general public has aversion to word "needles" LOL) I can come up with
>in inpatient hospital use, are classified as "sharps" and immediately
>after use placed in bright red disposal containers which along with
>non-needle items such as cotton, cloth, etc. with blood products or
>body fluids placed in specially marked containers for them, are
>disposed of complying with Federal specifications for such waste
>disposal.

Yes they do, and the reason for that is to protect people from
infections that they do not already have, or in other words, from
infections carried in the blood of others.

>Outside of hospitals, however, as I said being as I am not a frequent
>user of "lancets" for testing I admit that the only request which I
>see
>on the box and I'm ignorant of what else is suggested for home safe
>disposal is this: suggested placing in metal container such as empty
>soda or beer can and taping top opening shut. More frequent users
>may know more but I doubt recycling contaminated items is possible;
>the companies they pay to dispose in compliance actually from what
>I was told burn this type of waste.

I was diagnosed in August last year, and am probably working on my 5th
or 6th lancet.

--
roses are #FF0000
violets are #0000FF
all my base
are belong to you

Oleg Lego
June 22nd 08, 08:03 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:16:09 -0700 (PDT), hopitus posted:

>On Jun 21, 4:35 pm, "W. Baker" > wrote:
>> In alt.support.diabetes Richard Evans > wrote:
>> : The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> : day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> : preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> : lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> : previously used on the cat.
>>
>> : I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> : caught anything from the incident?
>>
>> Well, if you start to prowl at night and start to grow whiskers, I would
>> begin to worry:-)
>>
>> Wendy
>
>First - to Richard Evans, who has diabetes much worse than I do,
>obviously.
>I am on *your* side, dude...only criticism of you I have is that you
>joined
>the chorus of fruitcakes posting what *MOST* diabetics do with their
>lancets (reuse or not)! My sugar range is always less than 200. I have
>other health concerns than Type 2..

Many of us do have other health concerns, of course.

One thing though, many of us here would be trying hard to figure out
what went wrong is we could describe out sugar range as "always less
than 200". Personally, I want to describe it as "always under 140",
regardless of when I test.

>Now: how do we know Mr. Evans does NOT prowl at night, or if he indeed
>has whiskers? Answer: we don't.
>Mr. Evans please do not confuse my posts with the other wacko(s) who
>badmouth you about the lancets. Thank you.

--
roses are #FF0000
violets are #0000FF
all my base
are belong to you

Julie Bove
June 22nd 08, 08:26 AM
"John" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>
>> It's your own blood, where does the infection come from? It is perfectly
>> safe to reuse lancets as long as they are your own. I change mine maybe
>> once a week. If you use a alcohol swab you can always clean it before
>> use. They do get dull after a while and you can always tell because you
>> can feel it.
>>
>> Paul
>
> Once a week! Sometimes I'll literally go months and net feel any
> difference.

Me too.

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 08:46 AM
"John" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>
>> It's your own blood, where does the infection come from? It is perfectly
>> safe to reuse lancets as long as they are your own. I change mine maybe
>> once a week. If you use a alcohol swab you can always clean it before
>> use. They do get dull after a while and you can always tell because you
>> can feel it.
>>
>> Paul
>
> Once a week! Sometimes I'll literally go months and net feel any
> difference.
>

I keep about a half dozen in my test kit and just swap them out when the
idea strikes. Usually 1 a week, less is not uncommon. I was diagnosed in
May of 06, bought a box of 200 lancets and still have more than half them.

Paul

RodS
June 22nd 08, 09:17 AM
Michelle C wrote:
> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
> ...
>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> previously used on the cat.
>>
>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> caught anything from the incident?

If you start scratching behind your ear with your foot you may have
fleas:-) I shouldn't imagine it's any worse than being scratched by the cat.

(- -)
=m=(_)=m=
RodS T2
Australia


>
> Hi Richard,
>
> I'm just guessing, but I doubt that you can get anything harmful from your
> cat's lancet. Most things people worry about catching from their cat
> include ringworm (direct contact with skin), toxoplasmosis (from feces) and
> cat scratch fever (method of transmission obvious--cat scratch). I imagine
> being a family pet that it's unlikely your cat has any of these things, and
> none of them have to do with blood. According to a little googling, the
> blood diseases that may be carried by a cat--feline leukemia and feline
> immunodeficiency virus--cannot be transmitted to humans.

RodS
June 22nd 08, 09:25 AM
Many here change their lancets every St Swithens day if it needs it or not.

(- -)
=m=(_)=m=
RodS T2
Australia


Richard Evans wrote:
> hopitus > wrote:
>
>>>>> why are you reusing lancets??
>>>> Because that's been my practice for over ten years. Most diabetics
>>>> change lancets once or twice a year , if that.
>> Heh...is your doc living on S.S.? And how do YOU know what "most
>> diabetics"
>> do?
>
> Based on repeated threads on alt.support.diabetes over many years.
>
>> Please read last sentence of my other post here. Who are YOU to
>> jump
>> on this dude. No one is landing on you for what you choose to do.
>
> Uh, yes, they are. So far, nobody has answered my question, just
> ragged on me for reuising lancets.
>
>

dumb_fishie99
June 22nd 08, 10:01 AM
I change my lancets. It's a cleanliness thing, like getting the
old food off your dishes before putting new food on them.

Ozgirl
June 22nd 08, 10:44 AM
Alan S wrote:
> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:27:02 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
> > wrote:
>
>> On Jun 21, 5:21 pm, Alan S > wrote:
>>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:16:09 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
>>>
>>> > wrote:
>>>> My sugar range is always less than 200. I have
>>>> other health concerns than Type 2..
>>>
>>> Many of us have other health concerns. But high BG's can
>>> exacerbate those too.
>>>
>>> I can only speak for myself, but you'd be very welcome to
>>> drop in on a.s.d. I believe we could possibly help you
>>> improve those numbers without jeopardising those other
>>> concerns.
>>>
>>> This may interest you:http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045678.php
>>>
>>> Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
>>> --
>>> d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
>>> Everything in Moderation - Except
>>> Laughter.http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.comhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/http://loraltravel.blogspot.com(On
>>> Indian Roads)
>>
>> Why, thank you for the unexpected invitation, mate (nod to Oz)
>> your llink seemed most informative and I will investigate your
>> referrals. Someone I am very fond of in another ng I post to
>> lives in Oz someplace near Sydney but not right there.
>> G'Day.
>
> See you when you get here:-)

Maybe the person he/she is fond of is me?? :)

Alan S[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 01:30 PM
On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 02:01:35 -0700 (PDT), dumb_fishie99
> wrote:

>
>I change my lancets. It's a cleanliness thing, like getting the
>old food off your dishes before putting new food on them.

Poor analogy. There isn't any rotten food on the tip of my
lancet; just a tiny scrap of my own dried blood. Nor have I
ever had any infection from it. Nor has there ever been a
reported case of infection from re-use of a lancet by the
same person that I am aware of.

Several of us searched through Medline and Highwire a few
years ago when this perennial subject came up. IIRC there
was a case in the USA where two elderly ladies effectively
shared a lancet.

There were also several cases in Nursing Homes where lancets
were being changed between tests but infections occurred
because the nacelle of the lancet holder was not being
cleaned between tests. That is a point well worth
remembering if you test a friend or relative.

This is one I just found on a quick search, again related to
Nursing Homes, which is inconclusive: "Although no component
of the lancets or injection devices was shared among
residents, opportunities for HBV contamination of diabetes
care supplies were identified.
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/502057

And this is one which implies that re-using syringes isn't
much of a problem either:
http://tinyurl.com/57mx55 or
http://www.nursingresearchonline.com/pt/re/nnr/abstract.00006199-198711000-00008.htm;jsessionid=LpGpqtjGfTZbkTdkdlJ7fKvTSC7LX STjdz4PKBrnFvqycjHndBC9!2016747336!181195628!8091!-1

We didn't find any other reports. Let me know if you do.



Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

Alan S[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 01:31 PM
On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 19:44:50 +1000, "Ozgirl"
> wrote:

>Alan S wrote:
>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:27:02 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> On Jun 21, 5:21 pm, Alan S > wrote:
>>>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:16:09 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
>>>>
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>> My sugar range is always less than 200. I have
>>>>> other health concerns than Type 2..
>>>>
>>>> Many of us have other health concerns. But high BG's can
>>>> exacerbate those too.
>>>>
>>>> I can only speak for myself, but you'd be very welcome to
>>>> drop in on a.s.d. I believe we could possibly help you
>>>> improve those numbers without jeopardising those other
>>>> concerns.
>>>>
>>>> This may interest you:http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045678.php
>>>>
>>>> Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
>>>> --
>>>> d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
>>>> Everything in Moderation - Except
>>>> Laughter.http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.comhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/http://loraltravel.blogspot.com(On
>>>> Indian Roads)
>>>
>>> Why, thank you for the unexpected invitation, mate (nod to Oz)
>>> your llink seemed most informative and I will investigate your
>>> referrals. Someone I am very fond of in another ng I post to
>>> lives in Oz someplace near Sydney but not right there.
>>> G'Day.
>>
>> See you when you get here:-)
>
>Maybe the person he/she is fond of is me?? :)
>
Of course...

Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

Alan S[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 01:38 PM
On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 02:42:39 -0700 (PDT), hopitus
> wrote:

>Please do not misunderstand....I was *not* belittling your glucose
>level or
>level of diabetes by relating my usual level. Without describing my
>health
>problems in detail I will truthfully state that I am fairly sure that
>what will
>kill me will *not* be diabetes, due to other factors. Frankly, most of
>what
>I read on your website about it was *way* over my head and in my
>personal
>battle led by my doc (internal medicine) the enemy is *triglycerides*
>and
>CAD....a different ballpark (or battlefield, if you will).

You might want to run the relationship between high
triglycerides, low HDL and very high blood glucose levels
past that internal medecine doctor.

There may be many reasons. However, one immediately comes to
my mind, and I'm sure I'm not the only one from asd who
instantly thought this - all of those are related to
excessive carbohydrate ingestion in type 2 diabetics.

I can probably guess within 15gms the minimum carbs you are
eating at each meal (45-60). But I probably can't guess your
maximum. I'll also bet that your breakfast didn't come from
this choice of menus:
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/2006/10/breakfasts.html

I'd be very happy to hear that I guessed wrong.

Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
d&e, metformin 1500mg, ezetrol 10mg
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (On Indian Roads)

dumb_fishie99
June 22nd 08, 02:01 PM
Alan, it's just a personal thing. I'd rather be focused
on having a clean lancet, than on having non-fruity
soaps, you know? The non-fruity soap thing seems
a bit silly to me.

Bit if one has a diabetic pet around, it might be best
to always use a clean one to make sure you don't
mix up the lancets like this guy did. I guess the
same would work if there is more than one diabietic
of any species in one's home.

If there *were* any danger from having shared a
lancet with a cat, would one want to rely on
newsgroup advice that it's all all right, and
then find out later maybe it isn't?
Not me!

Michelle C
June 22nd 08, 05:27 PM
<Oleg Lego> wrote in message
...
>
snipped
>>
>>Former hospital worker here can tell you that used needles, which is
>>the nearest item to "lancets" (maybe they call them that because the
>>general public has aversion to word "needles" LOL) I can come up with
>>in inpatient hospital use, are classified as "sharps" and immediately
>>after use placed in bright red disposal containers which along with
>>non-needle items such as cotton, cloth, etc. with blood products or
>>body fluids placed in specially marked containers for them, are
>>disposed of complying with Federal specifications for such waste
>>disposal.
>
> Yes they do, and the reason for that is to protect people from
> infections that they do not already have, or in other words, from
> infections carried in the blood of others.

Not only other patients, but the nurses and lab techs too. Often that is
where the biggest danger lies. We (I used to be a lab tech) had set
procedures that we followed without fail, because it is so easy for those
wielding the needle to get stuck with it. One little distraction.... And
even so, I was stuck a couple of times in my career. The procedures can't
take carry of every circumstance, like the ER patient who appears docile,
but is really not mentally with it and unexpectedly fights when the blood
draw is drawn. In this instance, I had pricked her skin, she fought, and I
then I accidentally pricked my finger stabilizing the vein.

However, this has nothing to do with home use. Yes, you do not want to use
the same lancet on two or more people, but you're very unlikely to cause
yourself harm from this practice. The only precaution is not to use it if
you think it could have bacteria on it--like you've dropped it on the floor.
Common sense stuff. And as someone pointed out, if you use alcohol on the
lancet, you've removed this issue too. I re-use my lancet.
--
Best regards,
Michelle C., T2
diet & exercise
BMI 21.5

Michelle C
June 22nd 08, 05:39 PM
"hopitus" > wrote in message
...
> On Jun 22, 1:03 am, Oleg Lego <> wrote:
>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 16:16:09 -0700 (PDT), hopitus posted:
>>
>>
>>
>> >On Jun 21, 4:35 pm, "W. Baker" > wrote:
>> >> In alt.support.diabetes Richard Evans > wrote:
>> >> : The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> >> : day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today,
>> >> while
>> >> : preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead
>> >> of
>> >> : lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> >> : previously used on the cat.
>>
>> >> : I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> >> : caught anything from the incident?
>>
>> >> Well, if you start to prowl at night and start to grow whiskers, I
>> >> would
>> >> begin to worry:-)
>>
>> >> Wendy
>>
>> >First - to Richard Evans, who has diabetes much worse than I do,
>> >obviously.
>> >I am on *your* side, dude...only criticism of you I have is that you
>> >joined
>> >the chorus of fruitcakes posting what *MOST* diabetics do with their
>> >lancets (reuse or not)! My sugar range is always less than 200. I have
>> >other health concerns than Type 2..
>>
>> Many of us do have other health concerns, of course.
>>
>> One thing though, many of us here would be trying hard to figure out
>> what went wrong is we could describe out sugar range as "always less
>> than 200". Personally, I want to describe it as "always under 140",
>> regardless of when I test.
>>
>> >Now: how do we know Mr. Evans does NOT prowl at night, or if he indeed
>> >has whiskers? Answer: we don't.
>> >Mr. Evans please do not confuse my posts with the other wacko(s) who
>> >badmouth you about the lancets. Thank you.
>>
>> --
>> roses are #FF0000
>> violets are #0000FF
>> all my base
>> are belong to you
>
> Please do not misunderstand....I was *not* belittling your glucose
> level or
> level of diabetes by relating my usual level. Without describing my
> health
> problems in detail I will truthfully state that I am fairly sure that
> what will
> kill me will *not* be diabetes, due to other factors. Frankly, most of
> what
> I read on your website about it was *way* over my head and in my
> personal
> battle led by my doc (internal medicine) the enemy is *triglycerides*
> and
> CAD....a different ballpark (or battlefield, if you will).

High triglycerides are due to high BGs--excess BG is converted into
triglycerides. So if one of your main issues is triglycerides, then one of
your main issue IS diabetes. If you get your BGs down, your triglycerides
will come down.
--
Best regards,
Michelle C., T2
diet & exercise
BMI 21.5

percy
June 22nd 08, 06:34 PM
Richard Evans wrote:
> hopitus > wrote:
>
>>>>> why are you reusing lancets??
>>>> Because that's been my practice for over ten years. Most diabetics
>>>> change lancets once or twice a year , if that.
>> Heh...is your doc living on S.S.? And how do YOU know what "most
>> diabetics"
>> do?
>
> Based on repeated threads on alt.support.diabetes over many years.
>
>> Please read last sentence of my other post here. Who are YOU to
>> jump
>> on this dude. No one is landing on you for what you choose to do.
>
> Uh, yes, they are. So far, nobody has answered my question, just
> ragged on me for reuising lancets.
>
>

I've poked myself with the cats' lancets and syringes many times. Don't
sweat it. Worst case scenario is you'll come down with cat scratch
fever, but not likely.

The easiest way to forget all about lancet changes is to not bother
using a lancing device on the cat. Use just a naked lancet and a wadded
up cotton ball and poke the vein that runs around the outside of the
ear. It's completely painless, though it sometimes bleeds quite a bit. A
little pressure with the cotton ball for 30 seconds will staunch the flow.

Oh, and I'm T1 with an insulin pump and test 6 times a day minimum and I
change my lancet once a year - on St. Swithin's Day (July 15).

Unless I forget.

Vicki
Animas 2020
2 cats DM for 5 & 4 yrs.

UncleEnrico
June 23rd 08, 01:22 AM
Richard Evans wrote:
> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
> previously used on the cat.
>
> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
> caught anything from the incident?

I'm going to take a wild guess here, Richard. I'm betting you will be ok
having lanced yourself with your cat's lancet. I could be totally wrong,
but I just don't believe you're in for any serious exchange of harmful
bodily fluids with what a lancet might carry. I think you'd be in more
trouble if your cat bit you and broke your skin.

As for lancet changing, I change them about once every two weeks and
many on ASD claim to change them much less often.

MaryL
June 23rd 08, 04:34 AM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
> previously used on the cat.
>
> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
> caught anything from the incident?

This just occurred to me (belatedly, I admit). Is your tetanus immunization
up-to-date? If not, it's possible you should do that. Ask your doctor.

MaryL

GysdeJongh
June 23rd 08, 07:08 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
> previously used on the cat.
>
> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
> caught anything from the incident?

Hi Richard Evans,
diseases transmitted from cats to humans or Cat-Associated Zoonoses :
http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/162/17/1945
In the United States, it is estimated that there are at least 57 million pet
cats living in one third of all households.Cats are a source of
companionship and enjoyment to many people, but they can also transmit a
wide array of diseases to humans, ranging from trivial dermatophyte
infections to life-threatening conditions, such as bubonic plague.



Not totally harmless....

Take care

Gys

MaryL
June 23rd 08, 09:08 PM
"GysdeJongh" > wrote in message
. ..
> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
> ...
>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>> previously used on the cat.
>>
>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>> caught anything from the incident?
>
> Hi Richard Evans,
> diseases transmitted from cats to humans or Cat-Associated Zoonoses :
> http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/162/17/1945
> In the United States, it is estimated that there are at least 57 million
> pet cats living in one third of all households.Cats are a source of
> companionship and enjoyment to many people, but they can also transmit a
> wide array of diseases to humans, ranging from trivial dermatophyte
> infections to life-threatening conditions, such as bubonic plague.
>
>
>
> Not totally harmless....
>
> Take care
>
> Gys
>
>

Yes, but most of these are transmitted by air, bite, scratch, touch, etc. --
not by lancet. But it's still a good idea to ask questions of your
physician for something like this.

MaryL

Cathy F.[_2_]
June 23rd 08, 09:39 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
. ..
>
> "GysdeJongh" > wrote in message
> . ..
>> "Richard Evans" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> The cat and I are both diabetic. I check my own sugar 6-8 times per
>>> day, I check his twice. We have separate glucometer kits. Today, while
>>> preparing to check the cat's sugar, I had a brain fart and instead of
>>> lancing the cat I lanced my own forearm with a lancet that had been
>>> previously used on the cat.
>>>
>>> I immediately rinsed it with alcohol, but what are the chances I
>>> caught anything from the incident?
>>
>> Hi Richard Evans,
>> diseases transmitted from cats to humans or Cat-Associated Zoonoses :
>> http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/162/17/1945
>> In the United States, it is estimated that there are at least 57 million
>> pet cats living in one third of all households.Cats are a source of
>> companionship and enjoyment to many people, but they can also transmit a
>> wide array of diseases to humans, ranging from trivial dermatophyte
>> infections to life-threatening conditions, such as bubonic plague.
>>
>>
>>
>> Not totally harmless....
>>
>> Take care
>>
>> Gys
>>
>>
>
> Yes, but most of these are transmitted by air, bite, scratch, touch,
> etc. -- not by lancet. But it's still a good idea to ask questions of
> your physician for something like this.

Or your vet, since they have a pretty high risk of doing something along
these lines to themselves (inadvertent "sticks", etc.), over the years. And
they'd know what is transmittable, & what isn't.

Cathy


>
> MaryL

Trinkwasser
June 23rd 08, 10:19 PM
On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 09:39:51 -0700, "Michelle C"
> wrote:


>High triglycerides are due to high BGs--excess BG is converted into
>triglycerides. So if one of your main issues is triglycerides, then one of
>your main issue IS diabetes. If you get your BGs down, your triglycerides
>will come down.

Agreed, I brought my trigs down from 380 to 39 and put my HDL up from
25 to 54 by cutting the carbs and intelligent substitution of fats,
principally mono and polyunsaturates but not altogether avoiding
saturated fats in decent meats.

A few of the more enlightened dieticians might agree with this
approach.

For more, Google Quentin Grady or read Gary Taubes