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Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 21st 08, 11:04 PM
I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the chip
here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp end, piece of
wire coming out of one end. This is not something I would ever want in a
living body. I posted earlier about the cancer rates in chipped cats. I
decided to go for it. The surgery was trivial, the incision is 1 inch long,
the vet had no problem extracting it. The x-rays showed where the device
was.

I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my thoughts
on. I will never chip an animal, ever.

Paul

zob
June 22nd 08, 04:58 AM
On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:04:58 GMT, "Paul M. Cook" >
wrote:

>I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the chip
>here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp end, piece of
>wire coming out of one end. This is not something I would ever want in a
>living body. I posted earlier about the cancer rates in chipped cats. I
>decided to go for it. The surgery was trivial, the incision is 1 inch long,
>the vet had no problem extracting it. The x-rays showed where the device
>was.
>
>I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my thoughts
>on. I will never chip an animal, ever.
>
>Paul
>
I must be ignorant, because I'm not sure what you're referring to. Who
implanted this chip in your cat, and for what purpose?
---
Zob

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 08:41 AM
"zob" <[email protected] cox.net> wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:04:58 GMT, "Paul M. Cook" >
> wrote:
>
>>I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the chip
>>here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp end, piece of
>>wire coming out of one end. This is not something I would ever want in a
>>living body. I posted earlier about the cancer rates in chipped cats. I
>>decided to go for it. The surgery was trivial, the incision is 1 inch
>>long,
>>the vet had no problem extracting it. The x-rays showed where the device
>>was.
>>
>>I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my
>>thoughts
>>on. I will never chip an animal, ever.
>>
>>Paul
>>
> I must be ignorant, because I'm not sure what you're referring to. Who
> implanted this chip in your cat, and for what purpose?

One assumes readers have been around for a few weeks or more. As I stated
in a previous post, Jack came to me pre-chipped. My mother had him before
me and she had him chipped, with the very best of intentions. But that was
2 years ago and things have changed since then and more data is available
and it it not good.

Paul

Cathy F.[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 05:23 PM
"zob" <[email protected] cox.net> wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:04:58 GMT, "Paul M. Cook" >
> wrote:
>
>>I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the chip
>>here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp end, piece of
>>wire coming out of one end. This is not something I would ever want in a
>>living body. I posted earlier about the cancer rates in chipped cats. I
>>decided to go for it. The surgery was trivial, the incision is 1 inch
>>long,
>>the vet had no problem extracting it. The x-rays showed where the device
>>was.
>>
>>I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my
>>thoughts
>>on. I will never chip an animal, ever.
>>
>>Paul
>>
> I must be ignorant, because I'm not sure what you're referring to. Who
> implanted this chip in your cat, and for what purpose?

Cats are 'chipped' for ID purposes should they become lost. The chip can be
'read' by anyone who has the technology - shelters, vets' offices, etc., &
the owner then contacted.

Cathy


> ---
> Zob

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 07:21 PM
> Do you know of any later studies?


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 3, 2008

CASPIAN RELEASES NEW EVIDENCE OF VERICHIP LIES AND DECEPTION
Group's Latest Report Sets Record Straight on Chip Implants, Cancer, and
more

Opponents of the VeriChip implant are launching a new offensive against
the controversial human microchip this week, amid reports that VeriChip
plans to put its chipping division on the auction block. A new report
titled "Microchip Implants: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions"
released today by CASPIAN Consumer Privacy reveals dirty laundry the
company would probably rather keep hidden as it seeks a buyer for its
beleaguered product.

The 42-page report was authored by CASPIAN director Dr. Katherine
Albrecht, a Harvard-educated privacy expert and long-time critic of the
VeriChip. The highlight of the report is an eleven-page section titled
"Cancer Cover-up" that describes a systematic pattern of lies and
deception engaged by VeriChip executives in an effort to downplay the
fact that implantable microchips cause cancer in laboratory animals.

The report reveals how news outlets like Time Magazine, Business Week,
and the RFID Journal were used as unwitting pawns in a VeriChip scheme
to spread misinformation about the cancer studies. Since research
linking the product to cancer first surfaced last year, each of these
publications has repeated misstatements from VeriChip company
executives, in many cases printing the inaccurate statements verbatim
and unchallenged.

"These were not subjective issues, they were plainly verifiable issues
of fact," Albrecht said. "We were saddened to see the misstatements fall
through the fact-checking cracks of these respected publications. Now
that VeriChip is back in the headlines, we felt it was time to set the
record straight."

VeriChip's media efforts have done little to salvage the company's
public image or its financial performance, both of which plummeted after
research linking the implantable microchip to cancer was widely revealed
by the Associated Press in September 2007. The same company that once
predicted revenues in the "billions" earned just $3,000 from its
microchip implant operations in the first quarter of 2008, as patients
shun the device that many are now calling the "cancer chip."

Investors have also distanced themselves from the failing company, with
VeriChip's stock plummeting from a high of $10.62 last year to just over
$2.00 today.

VeriChip's VP of business development, Jay McKeage, acknowledged the
implant division suffers from "a substantial cash burn" and is "not
sustainable on its own." As a result, he says, VeriChip plans to "shop
the VeriMed / Health Link [human implantable chip] business around
widely" in hopes that another company will take the unpopular product
off its hands.

However, with recent blog headlines like "VeriChip Death Watch" making
the rounds, Albrecht has a hard time imagining who, if anyone, will want
to buy the business.

"This is a company that has engaged in a consistent pattern of making
false and misleading statements," she said. "It has lied to the public,
to the media, to its shareholders, and to regulatory agencies," she
said, citing additional evidence from the report indicating that
VeriChip hid cancer evidence from the FDA when the agency reviewed the
implant's safety in 2004.

"We laid out all the evidence in our report," she added. "We want to
make sure no one else gets burned by VeriChip."

================================================== ===========
ABOUT THE REPORT

CASPIAN's new report, "Microchip Implants: Answers to Frequently Asked
Questions," is a comprehensive reference guide to implantable microchips
in animals and humans. It provides thoroughly-researched, footnoted
answers to 85 of the most commonly asked questions about the implantable
microchip, including religious, privacy, social, and health questions.
The report concludes with a list of recommendations for patients, pet
owners, and policy makers affected by the device.

The new report is available for free download on the group's
AntiChips.com website at:
http://www.antichips.com/faq/index.html

While on the website, readers are encouraged to download Dr. Albrecht's
comprehensive 52-page overview of the studies, "Microchip-Induced Tumors
in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990-2006,"
and to review scanned copies of the original documents.


================================================== ===================
ABOUT CASPIAN

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering) is a
grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes since 1999
and irresponsible RFID use since 2002. With thousands of members in all 50
U.S. states and over 30 countries worldwide, CASPIAN seeks to educate
consumers about marketing strategies that invade their
privacy and encourage privacy-conscious shopping habits across the retail
spectrum.

http://www.spychips.com/
http://www.antichips.com/
http://www.nocards.org/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

================================================== ===================

To subscribe or unsubscribe to the Caspian-newsletter-l mailing list, click
the following link or copy and paste it into your browser:
http://mailman.nocards.org/mailman/listinfo/caspian-newsletter-l

If you have difficulty with the web-based interface, you may also
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================================================== ===================

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 22nd 08, 09:46 PM
> wrote in message
...
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in news:[email protected]:
>
>>
>>> Do you know of any later studies?
>>
>>
>> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
>> June 3, 2008
>>
>> CASPIAN RELEASES NEW EVIDENCE OF VERICHIP LIES AND DECEPTION
>> Group's Latest Report Sets Record Straight on Chip Implants, Cancer, and
>> more
>>
>> Opponents of the VeriChip implant are launching a new offensive against
>> the controversial human microchip this week, amid reports that VeriChip
>> plans to put its chipping division on the auction block. A new report
>> titled "Microchip Implants: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions"
>> released today by CASPIAN Consumer Privacy reveals dirty laundry the
>> company would probably rather keep hidden as it seeks a buyer for its
>> beleaguered product.
>>
>> The 42-page report was authored by CASPIAN director Dr. Katherine
>> Albrecht, a Harvard-educated privacy expert and long-time critic of the
>> VeriChip. The highlight of the report is an eleven-page section titled
>> "Cancer Cover-up" that describes a systematic pattern of lies and
>> deception engaged by VeriChip executives in an effort to downplay the
>> fact that implantable microchips cause cancer in laboratory animals.
>>
>>
>
> Thanks for the info. If not for these consumer groups, would we ever
> find
> out anything? Would any others here like to weigh in on this? A
> google
> news search of "animals and microchips" shows that many local government
> sponsored shelters are implanting microchips, and from what I remember
> reading some months ago, different municipalites use different chip
> manufacturers. Now I'm unsure as to what to do. Our cat was chipped as
> a
> mattter of course by the local SPCA and since she's a housecat who timidly
> walks out of the apartment (while I'm by the door) a few steps into the
> hallway once every few months, and then runs back in when called, there's
> really no need for a chip. Do we all put our cats through the rigors of
> a
> vet procedure to remove this thing, especially when it's been implanted
> for
> a number of years?
>

That was the dilemma I faced. My cat was chipped 2 years ago. The actual
procedure to remove it was trivial as it turned out. My sister had 2 of her
cats de-chipped and now we believe her vet was a rank incompetent and also
overcharged her something terrible. Jack's procedure was $466.00 but she
paid 800 each for her cats. Her cats had a harder time because the vet made
a huge incision in both of them. One cat he did not even x-ray at all
first. Jack's incision is 1 inch long and held together with 2 sutures.
The x-ray they took prior showed the exact location of the chip. It was
right under the skin between the shoulder blades. He had no recovery to
speak of, he was home that night eating and grooming and trying to forget
the day he had.

Was it worth it? You bet. I will never have to concern myself with cancer
from that chip. Plus the thing is pretty big with a sharp tip and I cannot
believe he did not feel it in there all this time. Soon his fur will grow
back and we can both forget the whole thing,

I'll post a pic later so you can see how small the wound is.

> Between this, the recent studies of the danger of cordless house phones
> and
> cellphones, pharmaceuticals suddenly taken off the market, water supply
> contamination in the nation's reservoirs, the tomato crop in Florida or
> elsewhere containing salmonella, the wheat gluten problem last year with
> pet food manufacturers, and the recent FDA closure on Petco's distribution
> center, I'm reminded of a famous comedian's line about health:
>
> "It's no longer a matter of staying healthy anymore. Everything is bad
> for
> you. All you can do is sit there and pick out the sickness that you
> like!"

Money is all that matters. That is what this country is all about now, sad
to say.

Paul

T
June 22nd 08, 10:58 PM
In article >, zob <[email protected]
cox.net> says...
> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:04:58 GMT, "Paul M. Cook" >
> wrote:
>
> >I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the chip
> >here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp end, piece of
> >wire coming out of one end. This is not something I would ever want in a
> >living body. I posted earlier about the cancer rates in chipped cats. I
> >decided to go for it. The surgery was trivial, the incision is 1 inch long,
> >the vet had no problem extracting it. The x-rays showed where the device
> >was.
> >
> >I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my thoughts
> >on. I will never chip an animal, ever.
> >
> >Paul
> >
> I must be ignorant, because I'm not sure what you're referring to. Who
> implanted this chip in your cat, and for what purpose?
> ---
> Zob
>

In a lot of cases the local pound will chip incoming animals.

That said, I'm curious about the chip. We've been putting hardware into
humans for some time now with no ill effect. But in cats a little tiny
bit of sealed hardware becomes a problem?

Weird.

Outsider
June 23rd 08, 05:49 AM
T > wrote in
:

> In article >, zob <[email protected]
> cox.net> says...
>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:04:58 GMT, "Paul M. Cook" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the
>> >chip here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp
>> >end, piece of wire coming out of one end. This is not something I
>> >would ever want in a living body. I posted earlier about the cancer
>> >rates in chipped cats. I decided to go for it. The surgery was
>> >trivial, the incision is 1 inch long, the vet had no problem
>> >extracting it. The x-rays showed where the device was.
>> >
>> >I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my
>> >thoughts on. I will never chip an animal, ever.
>> >
>> >Paul
>> >
>> I must be ignorant, because I'm not sure what you're referring to.
>> Who implanted this chip in your cat, and for what purpose?
>> ---
>> Zob
>>
>
> In a lot of cases the local pound will chip incoming animals.
>
> That said, I'm curious about the chip. We've been putting hardware
> into humans for some time now with no ill effect. But in cats a little
> tiny bit of sealed hardware becomes a problem?
>
> Weird.
>
>



Well it _was_ printed on the Internet so they must be bad.

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 23rd 08, 07:04 AM
"T" > wrote in message
. ..
> In article >, zob <[email protected]
> cox.net> says...
>> On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:04:58 GMT, "Paul M. Cook" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >I had my cat Jack de-chipped. I am so glad I did, too. I have the chip
>> >here and it is one mean looking thing. 1/2 inch long, sharp end, piece
>> >of
>> >wire coming out of one end. This is not something I would ever want in
>> >a
>> >living body. I posted earlier about the cancer rates in chipped cats.
>> >I
>> >decided to go for it. The surgery was trivial, the incision is 1 inch
>> >long,
>> >the vet had no problem extracting it. The x-rays showed where the
>> >device
>> >was.
>> >
>> >I feel it was worth it for he peace of mind. I am just passing my
>> >thoughts
>> >on. I will never chip an animal, ever.
>> >
>> >Paul
>> >
>> I must be ignorant, because I'm not sure what you're referring to. Who
>> implanted this chip in your cat, and for what purpose?
>> ---
>> Zob
>>
>
> In a lot of cases the local pound will chip incoming animals.
>
> That said, I'm curious about the chip. We've been putting hardware into
> humans for some time now with no ill effect. But in cats a little tiny
> bit of sealed hardware becomes a problem?
>
> Weird.

Not at all weird. Cats, dogs, rats, people are all distinct creatures with
distinct physiologies. The fact that a rat gets cancer may or may not be
significant when discussing cats. That is simple biology. These chips are
a physical irritant, they cause constant irritation and over time that can
lead to cancer at the site of irritation. A rat won't live long enough to
produce the same result as a longer lived mammal.

If these devices were so safe there would be no need to fake lab studies. I
would rather be of the safer than sorry school. And the company producing
these is floundering and their idea to rescue themselves was to put these
things into human babies.

Paul

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 26th 08, 01:25 AM
http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2ebbud1&s=3

I'm posting a picture for those who may consider thios procedure. As you
can see by the photograph, the surgery was very minor and the wound rather
small. It did not cause my cat any undo stress.

Paul

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
June 26th 08, 01:25 AM
http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2ebbud1&s=3

I'm posting a picture for those who may consider thios procedure. As you
can see by the photograph, the surgery was very minor and the wound rather
small. It did not cause my cat any undo stress.

Paul

J a c k
August 29th 08, 03:59 AM
T wrote:

> That said, I'm curious about the chip. We've been putting hardware into
> humans for some time now with no ill effect. But in cats a little tiny
> bit of sealed hardware becomes a problem?


Can you show us years of data on human implants of data chips
amounting to multiples of the normal human life span?

No? Then don't be so hasty to pronounce them safe.

We are slowly accumulating such data for cats over a significant
period of years, and preliminary indications raise serious
questions about pet chips and cancers. We can afford to go slow
and to avoid subjecting our animal family members to
experimentation we would not accept for our human family members.

Every medical procedure has pluses and minuses. Your priorities
may be different than mine. I choose not to have chips in my
animals. They are not, after all, going anywhere--and I can tell
one from another without a scanner.


Jack