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Stan Brown
July 2nd 08, 09:40 AM
I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
advice.

I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
one-year-old neutered male from the shelter. I worry, though, that
it may not be a good idea because I'm gone every weekday for work for
9.5 hours counting commuting, and during the summer I'm often out
doing yard work. The last time I had a cat, I was working from home
so there was plenty of time to play with him and make him feel secure
as he adjusted to his new home. Then a couple of years later when I
had outside work again I didn't worry about leaving him.

But this time he'd be on his own most of the day, right from the get-
go. He'd be the only pet in the household, and I'm the only human.
And he'll be exclusively an indoor cat -- I'd do that anyway, but
it's especially important since he was declawed before the shelter
got him. What do y'all think?

And assuming that I go ahead with the adoption, is there a helpful
FAQ about choice of food, choice of litterbox and litter, and so
forth? I know I can look in the newsgroup archives, but there are so
many contradictory opinions that I just get confused. Is there some
good authoritative source?

Thanks!

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

Dakota
July 2nd 08, 11:00 AM
On Jul 2, 4:40*am, Stan Brown > wrote:
> I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
> advice.
>
> I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
> one-year-old neutered male from the shelter. *I worry, though, that
> it may not be a good idea because I'm gone every weekday for work for
> 9.5 hours counting commuting, and during the summer I'm often out
> doing yard work. *The last time I had a cat, I was working from home
> so there was plenty of time to play with him and make him feel secure
> as he adjusted to his new home. Then a couple of years later when I
> had outside work again I didn't worry about leaving him.
>
> But this time he'd be on his own most of the day, right from the get-
> go. He'd be the only pet in the household, and I'm the only human.
> And he'll be exclusively an indoor cat -- I'd do that anyway, but
> it's especially important since he was declawed before the shelter
> got him. *What do y'all think?
>
> And assuming that I go ahead with the adoption, is there a helpful
> FAQ about choice of food, choice of litterbox and litter, and so
> forth? I know I can look in the newsgroup archives, but there are so
> many contradictory opinions that I just get confused. Is there some
> good authoritative source?
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

Two cats keep each other company; one will probably be lonely and
isolated for that many hours and might get into things to amuse
himself, since they don't read, watch TV, or surf on the computer.
People have very strong opinions about food, but I've fed cats the all-
natural high-end, all the way down to the cheapest off-brand.

I've had cats live healthy lives to age 21 on Meow Mix and Purina and
had one die at age 10 from high-end pet food that contained the
Chinese poisonous substance, so it's a crapshoot, from my experience.

Now my adults get Purina indoors dry (has some greens in it) with some
canned Friskies or 9 Lives, kittens are getting either Purina or Meow
Mix kitten food with a tiny bit of canned.

When I made a lot of money I always bought the high-end stuff, and
since I've been struggling, I don't, so it's a practical choice for
me.

Cats have litter preferences, in some cases, so you may have to try
different ones. Again, I used to buy the very high end stuff, and now
I just buy Priority multi-cat from the Safeway, and they use it just
fine. My kittens don't like the Yesterday's News, although I really
tried to train them to it trying to be "green." I gave up and went
back to the standard stuff. I just have a large litterbox and one
that's a bit smaller and covered, and I have several friends who swear
by the newer electronic ones. Cat size is a contributing factor--I
had one cat so big he needed the jumbo box just to fit his body in
it.

I've worked most of my adult life, and I think that cats are
completely happy as long as they have company in the form of another
cat, and you make sure they are well-cared-for and loved.

Rene S.
July 2nd 08, 02:20 PM
Hello,

Because of your schedule, I'd suggest adopting two cats (perhaps
there's a bonded adult pair already at your shelter?) They could keep
each other company while you're out. I originally had just one cat but
now that I have two, I'll never go back to having just one.

Ah, the food issue. I'd suggest (and use myself) a grain free wet
food, such as Wellness or Nature's Variety. Here's a good article on
feline nutrtition: http://www.catinfo.org/

As for litter, as Dakota said, different cats may prefer different
litters. You might start by seeing what brand the shelter uses, since
the cat is used to that, and slowly transition to another brand. I
like Everclean unscented, but I started using the more "green"
scoopable Feline Pine and my cats like that too. You can even offer a
few boxes with different litters and see what your cat(s) prefer.

Good luck and let us know who you decide to adopt.

blkcatgal
July 2nd 08, 02:34 PM
How about adopting 2 cats??? They can keep each other company when you are
not home. Also, get some interactive-type toys to keep them occupied when
you aren't there.

Good luck....

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
>I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
> advice.
>
> I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
> one-year-old neutered male from the shelter. I worry, though, that
> it may not be a good idea because I'm gone every weekday for work for
> 9.5 hours counting commuting, and during the summer I'm often out
> doing yard work. The last time I had a cat, I was working from home
> so there was plenty of time to play with him and make him feel secure
> as he adjusted to his new home. Then a couple of years later when I
> had outside work again I didn't worry about leaving him.
>
> But this time he'd be on his own most of the day, right from the get-
> go. He'd be the only pet in the household, and I'm the only human.
> And he'll be exclusively an indoor cat -- I'd do that anyway, but
> it's especially important since he was declawed before the shelter
> got him. What do y'all think?
>
> And assuming that I go ahead with the adoption, is there a helpful
> FAQ about choice of food, choice of litterbox and litter, and so
> forth? I know I can look in the newsgroup archives, but there are so
> many contradictory opinions that I just get confused. Is there some
> good authoritative source?
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

July 2nd 08, 03:12 PM
On Jul 2, 8:34*am, "blkcatgal" > wrote:
> How about adopting 2 cats??? *They can keep each other company when you are
> not home. *Also, get some interactive-type toys to keep them occupied when
> you aren't there.
>
> Good luck....
>
> S.
> --
> **Visit me and my cats athttp://www.island-cats.com/**
> ---"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
>
> t...
>
>
>
> >I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
> > advice.
>
> > I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
> > one-year-old neutered male from the shelter. *I worry, though, that
> > it may not be a good idea because I'm gone every weekday for work for
> > 9.5 hours counting commuting, and during the summer I'm often out
> > doing yard work. *The last time I had a cat, I was working from home
> > so there was plenty of time to play with him and make him feel secure
> > as he adjusted to his new home. Then a couple of years later when I
> > had outside work again I didn't worry about leaving him.
>
> > But this time he'd be on his own most of the day, right from the get-
> > go. He'd be the only pet in the household, and I'm the only human.
> > And he'll be exclusively an indoor cat -- I'd do that anyway, but
> > it's especially important since he was declawed before the shelter
> > got him. *What do y'all think?
>
> > And assuming that I go ahead with the adoption, is there a helpful
> > FAQ about choice of food, choice of litterbox and litter, and so
> > forth? I know I can look in the newsgroup archives, but there are so
> > many contradictory opinions that I just get confused. Is there some
> > good authoritative source?
>
> > Thanks!
>
> > --
> > Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *http://OakRoadSystems.com
> > Shikata ga nai...- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Adopting a cat is a great idea! If you are afraid that the cat is
going to be lonely, then perhaps a playmate (another cat) would be a
good idea. If you do not want two cats, then I would see how it
goes. Try having the cat by itself for a while and see if the feline
shows any signs of depression. All cats are different and react
differently in situations. As far as cat health, food, litter box
material, and other things such as toys, I found a great book that
answers so many questions and has great advice on raising a happy
healthy cat. check it out on www.catbehaviorsecrets.com

GOOD LUCK with your future feline friend!!!!!!

cshenk
July 2nd 08, 05:47 PM
"Stan Brown" wrote

Hi Stan! You got lots of good advice there but I'll add the one disclaimer
on the second cat. Not all cats are happy having a second cat. My cat
Daisy (also a rescue kitty like you are contemplating) is an 'only cat' sort
but she's real happy to have a dog companion. Odd I know, but thats how she
is.

One way to tell a good match is if there is a second cat in his cage with
him. He's apt to like having a second cat around. Good pick would be that
second cat in with him already.

Generic advice, if he seems to get along with other cats but there isnt one
in the cage with him, try a second that is female first. More apt to get
along. You can test this at the facility.

Very good chance the rescue facility already has tested the cat for
compatibility with other pets. Ask. Daisy for example would select the
farthest part of her cage, from any other cats nearby (we didnt notice at
first but they showed us). She doesnt fight with other cats if they leave
her alone, but she will not tolerate others in her area and tends to be
terratorial. Conversely though, she sleeps *on* our dog and does the mutual
butt-sniffing with him.

No, I'm not suggesting a dog. You can't have one indoors for all day and
have a happy dog, nor is just leaving them out in the yard going to solve
anything (short of a farm, this can be abusive to do). My husband is
retired so always has someone around to take him out, minus the short
occasional times when we all go shopping (he's crate trained for those few
times).

Daisy would have been fine as a lone cat during the day if we had no dog.
Her nature leads to it better than a second cat.

Bryce
July 2nd 08, 10:29 PM
Stan Brown wrote:

> I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
> advice.
>
> I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
> one-year-old neutered male from the shelter. I worry, though, that
> it may not be a good idea because I'm gone every weekday for work for
> 9.5 hours counting commuting, and during the summer I'm often out
> doing yard work. The last time I had a cat, I was working from home
> so there was plenty of time to play with him and make him feel secure
> as he adjusted to his new home. Then a couple of years later when I
> had outside work again I didn't worry about leaving him.
>
> But this time he'd be on his own most of the day, right from the get-
> go. He'd be the only pet in the household, and I'm the only human.
> And he'll be exclusively an indoor cat -- I'd do that anyway, but
> it's especially important since he was declawed before the shelter
> got him. What do y'all think?
>
> And assuming that I go ahead with the adoption, is there a helpful
> FAQ about choice of food, choice of litterbox and litter, and so
> forth? I know I can look in the newsgroup archives, but there are so
> many contradictory opinions that I just get confused. Is there some
> good authoritative source?
>
> Thanks!
>
You have been clean for over eleven years. We never are
completely cured though. After all those years, your resolve
has weakened and you have already contacted a dealer. There
are many anecdotal reports that cat-keepers have lower blood
pressure, higher spirits, and may recover sooner from serious
illness. It has been shown that holding breath while cleaning
a litterbox improves lung function. Stan, after successfully
allowing your body to deteriorate for over a decade, do you
really want to risk slowing down (or even reversing) that trend??

Then go ahead and do it. Two may keep each other company, but
I don't think that's a requirement. Over the years, I have had
one to as many as four at a time. I think two is best. It
completely obscures whodunit when a bit of mischief happens and
they can take turns walking back and forth between you and the
keyboard.

I hope there's somebody to give you a little welcome-home bump
in the ankle soon! Let us know.

Outsider
July 2nd 08, 11:26 PM
Stan Brown > wrote in
t:

> I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
> advice.
>
> I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
> one-year-old neutered male from the shelter.
..
..
..
..
> Thanks!
>


I adopted two male littermates about a year old in January. I am out of
the house 9.5 to 11.5 hours a day. They keep each other great company
while I am gone and their interactions are just another source of fun for
me. One of them has bonded with me very much and the other is a bit more
nervous but is getting less so each day. When I get home they both come
out and great me for a few minutes and then either play in the living
room or go back to their own room and nap in their window. Two cats are
a slight bit more work and, of course, almost double the expense but it
is well worth it for me knowing they just don't get lonsome while I am
gone. It is not hard to find two cats in a single cage at any shelter
where you are asked to take both. Give this some consideration.

Andy

cybercat
July 3rd 08, 12:48 AM
"outsider" > wrote in message
...
> Stan Brown > wrote in
> t:
>
>> I know this is a dangerous admission on Usenet, :-) but I'd like
>> advice.
>>
>> I've been ten years without a cat, and I'm thinking of adopting a
>> one-year-old neutered male from the shelter.
> .
> .
> .
> .
>> Thanks!
>>
>
>
> I adopted two male littermates about a year old in January. I am out of
> the house 9.5 to 11.5 hours a day. They keep each other great company
> while I am gone and their interactions are just another source of fun for
> me. One of them has bonded with me very much and the other is a bit more
> nervous but is getting less so each day. When I get home they both come
> out and great me for a few minutes and then either play in the living
> room or go back to their own room and nap in their window. Two cats are
> a slight bit more work and, of course, almost double the expense but it
> is well worth it for me knowing they just don't get lonsome while I am
> gone. It is not hard to find two cats in a single cage at any shelter
> where you are asked to take both. Give this some consideration.
>

This is just such a great idea! I want to do this next time I adopt.

Phil P.
July 3rd 08, 12:57 AM
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> But this time he'd be on his own most of the day, right from the get-
> go. He'd be the only pet in the household, and I'm the only human.
> And he'll be exclusively an indoor cat -- I'd do that anyway, but
> it's especially important since he was declawed before the shelter
> got him. What do y'all think?


I think you should adopt two, bonded adult cats. Not only as playmates for
each other and to keep each company when you're not home, but also to make
the transition from the shelter and adaptation to your home much easier on
them. They would provide security and comfort for each other during the
transition period.

Since you're already concerned about a single cat being alone most of the
day, its very possible you'll adopt a companion for him. Its always better
to adopt two cats together that are already bonded and have a relationship
than adopting two singles and hope they get along. Its better for the cats-
and its better for you. You'll also be preventing two life-long companions
from being split up- as most shelters do.


> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA

If you can't find a pair in the Topkins County SPCA, I have four wonderful
pairs up for adoption. Too bad you live so far away.


http://maxshouse.com/Adoptions/JillJoJo-web.jpg

http://maxshouse.com/Adoptions/milo+moli_feature.htm

http://maxshouse.com/Adoptions/NicholasDustin.jpg

http://maxshouse.com/Adoptions/BennyParis-web.jpg


Best of luck,

Phil

boot
July 3rd 08, 02:36 AM
Hi Stan! Just wanted to throw in a couple of "cat facts" that might
help you make up your mind:

One: Cats are creatures of habit, they form routines quickly based on
what goes on regularly in their home: thus your cat will quickly
learn what time you come home, and will look forward to that time. If
your hours don't vary much, the cat will get used to that routine.

Two: Cats need 14 hours of sleep daily, so he will probably end up
using his time alone to get his deep sleep needs in.

There was a TV program that featured a problem with 2 siamese cats
that tore up the house while their owner was at work all day; the
consultant designed a kitty play area for them in the spare bedroom,
with things to climb on, cat walks, and dangling strings, etc. A
camera was mounted to see how they did, and they made good use of
their playground.

I empathize with your concerns. I am retired now, but don't like to
leave my cat for long periods alone. I think as they get older they
may not mind as much, because they aren't as active. Well, best of
luck, I hope you are both very happy.

Stan Brown
July 3rd 08, 03:01 AM
Thanks for the advice re leaving the cat alone.

I may not have made it clear in my first article that I was thinking
of adopting a *particular* one-year-old male, Milo. I saw him at the
display in Petsmart and fell for him.

Last night I went ahead and filled out the adoption papers after I
got to meet Milo. He was not effusively affectionate, but after all
he was in a strange environment. I picked him up and could tell he
was just tolerating it to be polite, so I put him down and he did the
head-bumping-ankle think, then flopped on his side on the floor to be
played with. So I think we will get along.

To answer the "adult pairs" issue, he was alone in the cage. When
the SPCA phoned today after checking my references I raised my
concern about his alone time and the lady said he was a very laid-
back cat, used to being alone, and she didn't expect there would be
any problem. As one poster here has mentioned, she also predicted
he'd probably use much of that time for sleeping.

A couple of you mentioned seeing how it goes and maybe getting him a
playmate. If he was part of a pair I would have adopted both, but
I'll be on the alert for symptoms of depression and if necessary I'll
get a second cat. Maybe I can take him with me to the shelter and
see how he reacts to various candidates -- if and when.

Thanks too for the advice to find out what type of litter the shelter
uses. I know cats don't like change, so I should probably start with
the food and litter that he's used to. I'll phone them tomorrow. I
have to buy all my supplies tomorrow, and then go pick him up Friday.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

MaryL
July 3rd 08, 03:16 PM
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> Thanks for the advice re leaving the cat alone.
>
> I may not have made it clear in my first article that I was thinking
> of adopting a *particular* one-year-old male, Milo. I saw him at the
> display in Petsmart and fell for him.
>
> Last night I went ahead and filled out the adoption papers after I
> got to meet Milo. He was not effusively affectionate, but after all
> he was in a strange environment. I picked him up and could tell he
> was just tolerating it to be polite, so I put him down and he did the
> head-bumping-ankle think, then flopped on his side on the floor to be
> played with. So I think we will get along.
>
> To answer the "adult pairs" issue, he was alone in the cage. When
> the SPCA phoned today after checking my references I raised my
> concern about his alone time and the lady said he was a very laid-
> back cat, used to being alone, and she didn't expect there would be
> any problem. As one poster here has mentioned, she also predicted
> he'd probably use much of that time for sleeping.
>
> A couple of you mentioned seeing how it goes and maybe getting him a
> playmate. If he was part of a pair I would have adopted both, but
> I'll be on the alert for symptoms of depression and if necessary I'll
> get a second cat. Maybe I can take him with me to the shelter and
> see how he reacts to various candidates -- if and when.
>
> Thanks too for the advice to find out what type of litter the shelter
> uses. I know cats don't like change, so I should probably start with
> the food and litter that he's used to. I'll phone them tomorrow. I
> have to buy all my supplies tomorrow, and then go pick him up Friday.
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

Concatulations on adopting Milo -- and congratulations to him, too. I did
want to comment on a couple of items in your message: First, please *do not
even think about* taking Milo to the shelter to see how he reacts to other
potential roommates. The setting would be entirely foreign to him at that
time, and his reaction would not be a good barometer for assessing
adoptions. More likely, he would become completely stressed-out in that
situation, and you could even be exposing him to the possibility of coming
into contact with disease or parasites. That is also one (but only one) of
the reasons that any new adoptee should be kept isolated from Milo if you
bring another cat home. Second, you should count on a considerable period
of integration before introducing Milo to another cat if you do decide to
adopt a companion. A second cat is a great idea, but they should not simply
be "thrown together." That sometimes works, but it is a prescription that
can also lead to disaster.

Again, congratulations to you both!

MaryL

Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
Recent pics: http://tinyurl.com/clal7

Rene S.
July 3rd 08, 05:38 PM
On Jul 3, 9:16*am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Stan Brown" > wrote in message
>
> t...
>
>
>
> > Thanks for the advice re leaving the cat alone.
>
> > I may not have made it clear in my first article that I was thinking
> > of adopting a *particular* one-year-old male, Milo. *I saw him at the
> > display in Petsmart and fell for him.
>
> > Last night I went ahead and filled out the adoption papers after I
> > got to meet Milo. *He was not effusively affectionate, but after all
> > he was in a strange environment. I picked him up and could tell he
> > was just tolerating it to be polite, so I put him down and he did the
> > head-bumping-ankle think, then flopped on his side on the floor to be
> > played with. So I think we will get along.
>
> > To answer the "adult pairs" issue, he was alone in the cage. *When
> > the SPCA phoned today after checking my references I raised my
> > concern about his alone time and the lady said he was a very laid-
> > back cat, used to being alone, and she didn't expect there would be
> > any problem. As one poster here has mentioned, she also predicted
> > he'd probably use much of that time for sleeping.
>
> > A couple of you mentioned seeing how it goes and maybe getting him a
> > playmate. If he was part of a pair I would have adopted both, but
> > I'll be on the alert for symptoms of depression and if necessary I'll
> > get a second cat. *Maybe I can take him with me to the shelter and
> > see how he reacts to various candidates -- if and when.
>
> > Thanks too for the advice to find out what type of litter the shelter
> > uses. I know cats don't like change, so I should probably start with
> > the food and litter that he's used to. *I'll phone them tomorrow. *I
> > have to buy all my supplies tomorrow, and then go pick him up Friday.
>
> > --
> > Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *http://OakRoadSystems.com
> > Shikata ga nai...
>
> Concatulations on adopting Milo -- and congratulations to him, too. *I did
> want to comment on a couple of items in your message: *First, please *do not
> even think about* taking Milo to the shelter to see how he reacts to other
> potential roommates. *The setting would be entirely foreign to him at that
> time, and his reaction would not be a good barometer for assessing
> adoptions. *More likely, he would become completely stressed-out in that
> situation, and you could even be exposing him to the possibility of coming
> into contact with disease or parasites. *

Well said, Mary. If you decide to adopt a second cat, you should
describe your cat in detail (if it's not already in your file), and
the shelter can match you with another cat. For instance, since he's
laid back, another laid back or younger cat might be a good match.

Good luck with your adoption!

Rene

Stan Brown
July 3rd 08, 11:35 PM
Thu, 3 Jul 2008 09:16:56 -0500 from MaryL -
OUT-THE-LITTER>:
> *do not
> even think about* taking Milo to the shelter to see how he reacts to other
> potential roommates. The setting would be entirely foreign to him at that
> time, and his reaction would not be a good barometer for assessing
> adoptions.

That makes sense. In any event, I wouldn't do anything right away.
First I want to let him adapt to his new home and feel secure here.
And from what the SPCA were saying he may be perfectly happy on his
own during the day. (Dexter the Wonder Cat was the only cat in the
house for the last 6 or 7 years of his life, wile I worked in an
office, and he was fine.)

I called the SPCA today to ask about his food preferences and litter
preferences. They said he's not at all fussy -- they've had him on
Arm & Hammer clumping as well as shredded newspaper. For food they
were doing Hills (because it's free to them) but Petsmart does
something else. They recommended starting him on Purina Indoor Cat.

I'm excited to pick him up tomorrow. It's ten years since I had a
cat in the home. Last night I went through the house looking for
potential kitty disaster areas, and I think we're pretty well safe.
I do have a motion-sensor trash can, and I figure it's only a matte
of me till he figures out how to open it. :-)


--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

blkcatgal
July 3rd 08, 11:45 PM
Good luck, Stan. I think Milo is very lucky that he found you...or that you
found him! You'll be a great cat-dad.

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> Thu, 3 Jul 2008 09:16:56 -0500 from MaryL -
> OUT-THE-LITTER>:
>> *do not
>> even think about* taking Milo to the shelter to see how he reacts to
>> other
>> potential roommates. The setting would be entirely foreign to him at
>> that
>> time, and his reaction would not be a good barometer for assessing
>> adoptions.
>
> That makes sense. In any event, I wouldn't do anything right away.
> First I want to let him adapt to his new home and feel secure here.
> And from what the SPCA were saying he may be perfectly happy on his
> own during the day. (Dexter the Wonder Cat was the only cat in the
> house for the last 6 or 7 years of his life, wile I worked in an
> office, and he was fine.)
>
> I called the SPCA today to ask about his food preferences and litter
> preferences. They said he's not at all fussy -- they've had him on
> Arm & Hammer clumping as well as shredded newspaper. For food they
> were doing Hills (because it's free to them) but Petsmart does
> something else. They recommended starting him on Purina Indoor Cat.
>
> I'm excited to pick him up tomorrow. It's ten years since I had a
> cat in the home. Last night I went through the house looking for
> potential kitty disaster areas, and I think we're pretty well safe.
> I do have a motion-sensor trash can, and I figure it's only a matte
> of me till he figures out how to open it. :-)
>
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

MaryL
July 4th 08, 12:09 AM
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> I'm excited to pick him up tomorrow. It's ten years since I had a
> cat in the home. Last night I went through the house looking for
> potential kitty disaster areas, and I think we're pretty well safe.
> I do have a motion-sensor trash can, and I figure it's only a matte
> of me till he figures out how to open it. :-)
>
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

Do you have a shredder? If so, be sure to turn it off when you are not
using it. That's good practice, anyway, but there have been a few
(fortunately, very *few*) reports of cats being injured when pushing their
paws down the slot on an active shredder. So, that's something else to add
to the list when cat-proofing a house or apartment.

MaryL

Bryce
July 4th 08, 12:25 AM
Stan Brown wrote:

> Thu, 3 Jul 2008 09:16:56 -0500 from MaryL -
> OUT-THE-LITTER>:
>> *do not
>> even think about* taking Milo to the shelter to see how he reacts to
>> other
>> potential roommates. The setting would be entirely foreign to him at
>> that time, and his reaction would not be a good barometer for assessing
>> adoptions.
>
> That makes sense. In any event, I wouldn't do anything right away.
> First I want to let him adapt to his new home and feel secure here.
> And from what the SPCA were saying he may be perfectly happy on his
> own during the day. (Dexter the Wonder Cat was the only cat in the
> house for the last 6 or 7 years of his life, wile I worked in an
> office, and he was fine.)
>
> I called the SPCA today to ask about his food preferences and litter
> preferences. They said he's not at all fussy -- they've had him on
> Arm & Hammer clumping as well as shredded newspaper. For food they
> were doing Hills (because it's free to them) but Petsmart does
> something else. They recommended starting him on Purina Indoor Cat.
>
> I'm excited to pick him up tomorrow. It's ten years since I had a
> cat in the home. Last night I went through the house looking for
> potential kitty disaster areas, and I think we're pretty well safe.
> I do have a motion-sensor trash can, and I figure it's only a matte
> of me till he figures out how to open it. :-)
>
I recall coming home one evening to find my nearly-new flat-panel
monitor face down on the floor. They don't drop well. None of
my furkids would own up to it. Since then, I put the screen face
down on the desktop when not in use. Much more stable.

Congrats on Milo! The hospital on Mayfield Road wishes you well.

Stan Brown
July 4th 08, 03:04 PM
Thu, 3 Jul 2008 18:09:21 -0500 from MaryL -
OUT-THE-LITTER>:
> Do you have a shredder? If so, be sure to turn it off when you are not
> using it. That's good practice, anyway, but there have been a few
> (fortunately, very *few*) reports of cats being injured when pushing their
> paws down the slot on an active shredder. So, that's something else to add
> to the list when cat-proofing a house or apartment.

That's good advice, and as a matter of fact I already do that because
I'm afraid of one day dropping an important document, say while
opening the mail, and accidentally shredding it.

I'm more concerned about my motion-sensor trash can. I usually leave
that turned on, but if a certain someone jumps on the counter and
then waves a paw over the can, or pokes a head over the can, it will
open for him. So I have to remember to turn it off when I'm not in
the kitchen.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

Outsider
July 4th 08, 03:23 PM
Stan Brown > wrote in
t:


>> Do you have a shredder? If so, be sure to turn it off when you are
>> not using it.
..
..
..
> That's good advice, and as a matter of fact I already do that because
> I'm afraid of one day dropping an important document, say while
> opening the mail, and accidentally shredding it.


Oh yeah! And you just _know_ the damn thing will travel three feet
sideways to accomplish this!

Stan Brown
July 5th 08, 02:27 PM
Thanks for everyone for your advice. I'll try to post pictures when I
can. (Milo is a one-year-old neutered male gray/brown tabby. I had
thought he had no claws, but I found out yesterday that he does still
have them. No, I'm not even thinking about having him declawed.)

I picked Milo up yesterday and we got home around 4 PM. I was
curious to see how he'd adapt.

Well, he is *not* one of those cats that hide under the bed for the
first few weeks. He prowled around (exploring, not angry),
occasionally flopping down on the floor for a few minutes or sitting
in a window for a few minutes. He was fascinated with the neighbors
doing yard work. I let him do what he wanted, but frequently when I
saw him I spoke to him or petted him.

I showed him the litter box in the basement, and he used it
immediately. This morning I sifted out three clumps, so it looks like
he has also used it when not supervised.

It was about three hours after we got home that he finally jumped
spontaneously into my lap. But after a few minutes he was in
"explorer mode" again.

Around 9 PM we were both ready for sleep, but he was not happy with
all the firecrackers in the neighborhood. Every time he settled down
on my bed another series started off, and he'd jump to the window
sill to investigate -- using my pillow as a launching pad. :-) Of
course I talked to him and petted him a lot.

This morning when I woke up he was on my bed asleep, and since then
he's been alternating cat naps with prowling around inspecting the
house. I was watching TV at one point, and he came over making a
particular noise that I think is his "pick me up!" signal, because
when I did he snuggled right in and started purring.

I think we're going to be just fine together. I still need to get
him a scratching post and something to climb on.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

blkcatgal
July 5th 08, 04:10 PM
Sounds like you have found an excellent friend! Congratulations!

S.
--
**Visit me and my cats at http://www.island-cats.com/ **
---
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> Thanks for everyone for your advice. I'll try to post pictures when I
> can. (Milo is a one-year-old neutered male gray/brown tabby. I had
> thought he had no claws, but I found out yesterday that he does still
> have them. No, I'm not even thinking about having him declawed.)
>
> I picked Milo up yesterday and we got home around 4 PM. I was
> curious to see how he'd adapt.
>
> Well, he is *not* one of those cats that hide under the bed for the
> first few weeks. He prowled around (exploring, not angry),
> occasionally flopping down on the floor for a few minutes or sitting
> in a window for a few minutes. He was fascinated with the neighbors
> doing yard work. I let him do what he wanted, but frequently when I
> saw him I spoke to him or petted him.
>
> I showed him the litter box in the basement, and he used it
> immediately. This morning I sifted out three clumps, so it looks like
> he has also used it when not supervised.
>
> It was about three hours after we got home that he finally jumped
> spontaneously into my lap. But after a few minutes he was in
> "explorer mode" again.
>
> Around 9 PM we were both ready for sleep, but he was not happy with
> all the firecrackers in the neighborhood. Every time he settled down
> on my bed another series started off, and he'd jump to the window
> sill to investigate -- using my pillow as a launching pad. :-) Of
> course I talked to him and petted him a lot.
>
> This morning when I woke up he was on my bed asleep, and since then
> he's been alternating cat naps with prowling around inspecting the
> house. I was watching TV at one point, and he came over making a
> particular noise that I think is his "pick me up!" signal, because
> when I did he snuggled right in and started purring.
>
> I think we're going to be just fine together. I still need to get
> him a scratching post and something to climb on.
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

cybercat
July 5th 08, 04:51 PM
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> Thanks for everyone for your advice. I'll try to post pictures when I
> can. (Milo is a one-year-old neutered male gray/brown tabby. I had
> thought he had no claws, but I found out yesterday that he does still
> have them. No, I'm not even thinking about having him declawed.)
>
> I picked Milo up yesterday and we got home around 4 PM. I was
> curious to see how he'd adapt.
>
> Well, he is *not* one of those cats that hide under the bed for the
> first few weeks. He prowled around (exploring, not angry),
> occasionally flopping down on the floor for a few minutes or sitting
> in a window for a few minutes. He was fascinated with the neighbors
> doing yard work. I let him do what he wanted, but frequently when I
> saw him I spoke to him or petted him.
>
> I showed him the litter box in the basement, and he used it
> immediately. This morning I sifted out three clumps, so it looks like
> he has also used it when not supervised.
>
> It was about three hours after we got home that he finally jumped
> spontaneously into my lap. But after a few minutes he was in
> "explorer mode" again.
>
> Around 9 PM we were both ready for sleep, but he was not happy with
> all the firecrackers in the neighborhood. Every time he settled down
> on my bed another series started off, and he'd jump to the window
> sill to investigate -- using my pillow as a launching pad. :-) Of
> course I talked to him and petted him a lot.
>
> This morning when I woke up he was on my bed asleep, and since then
> he's been alternating cat naps with prowling around inspecting the
> house. I was watching TV at one point, and he came over making a
> particular noise that I think is his "pick me up!" signal, because
> when I did he snuggled right in and started purring.
>
> I think we're going to be just fine together. I still need to get
> him a scratching post and something to climb on.
>
Milo sounds GREAT! And you sound like a great cat companion.

We clip claws once a month or so, and you have had cats before,
but have you ever had an Alpin Scratcher? Every cat I have ever
known loved these, and preferred to scratch them over anything
else. You can get them at PetsSmart or any pet supply place:

http://www.cosmicpet.com/scratchers.htm

Here's to a long and happy friendship for you and Milo!

Stan Brown
July 6th 08, 05:41 AM
Sat, 5 Jul 2008 11:51:45 -0400 from cybercat >:
> Milo sounds GREAT! And you sound like a great cat companion.

:-)

> We clip claws once a month or so, and you have had cats before,
> but have you ever had an Alpin Scratcher? Every cat I have ever
> known loved these, and preferred to scratch them over anything
> else. You can get them at PetsSmart or any pet supply place:
>
> http://www.cosmicpet.com/scratchers.htm

This is very timely. I visited Petsmart today, but forgot my coupons
so I didn't buy anything. I don't know yet whether he's susceptible
to catnip, but that scratcher looks like a good bet to try.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

Lesley
July 6th 08, 04:16 PM
On 5 Jul, 21:41, Stan Brown > wrote:

> but that scratcher looks like a good bet to try.
>
>My cats wouldn't use a conventional scratching post (apart from to stand on so they could reach the back of the armchair to scratch that!) but when introduced to a Cosmic cat scratcher -which is something like the Alpine only not sloped they were straight in with no hesitation and have used them ever since

Of course this is typical for cats- the damn things aren't made in the
UK, the first few I got were part of a job lot that the local pet
store got and sold off cheaply and I have since managed to get half a
dozen or so from Ebay, which were nothing like as cheap and I am down
to my last one so I am going to have to start searching again

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

cybercat
July 6th 08, 04:50 PM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
...
> On 5 Jul, 21:41, Stan Brown > wrote:
>
>> but that scratcher looks like a good bet to try.
>>
>>My cats wouldn't use a conventional scratching post (apart from to stand
>>on so they could reach the back of the armchair to scratch that!) but when
>>introduced to a Cosmic cat scratcher -which is something like the Alpine
>>only not sloped they were straight in with no hesitation and have used
>>them ever since
>
> Of course this is typical for cats- the damn things aren't made in the
> UK, the first few I got were part of a job lot that the local pet
> store got and sold off cheaply and I have since managed to get half a
> dozen or so from Ebay, which were nothing like as cheap and I am down
> to my last one so I am going to have to start searching again
>
> Lesley
>
If you want, you can email me privately and I will pick one up for you and
send it on, you
can reimburse for shipping and cost. I got a slanted scratcher (Alpine
brand) at Petsmart
for $10 last week. They are very light, I don't know how much shipping would
be but
we could figure it out with a shipping calculator. I am in Raleigh, NC.
Might be cheaper
to ship two. Anyway, if you are interested, just let me know. Everything
here is very
convenient and retail is down so low, things are cheap too. (The Alpine used
to be
$13.)

Rene S.
July 7th 08, 05:01 PM
> We clip claws once a month or so, and you have had cats before,
> but have you ever had an Alpin Scratcher? Every cat I have ever
> known loved these, and preferred to scratch them over anything
> else. You can get them at PetsSmart or any pet supply place:
>
> http://www.cosmicpet.com/scratchers.htm
>
> Here's to a long and happy friendship for you and Milo!

I second the Alpine Scratcher. When I socialized cats at the shelter,
nearly every cat loved this scratcher. It was a popular item.

Stan Brown
July 8th 08, 12:53 PM
Sun, 6 Jul 2008 00:41:49 -0400 from Stan Brown
>:
> Sat, 5 Jul 2008 11:51:45 -0400 from cybercat >:
> > but have you ever had an Alpin Scratcher? Every cat I have ever
> > known loved these, and preferred to scratch them over anything
> > else. You can get them at PetsSmart or any pet supply place:
> >
> > http://www.cosmicpet.com/scratchers.htm
>
> This is very timely. I visited Petsmart today, but forgot my coupons
> so I didn't buy anything. I don't know yet whether he's susceptible
> to catnip, but that scratcher looks like a good bet to try.

Petsmart didn't have an Alpine brand, but something similar. Milo
didn't scratch it that much, but he licked it quite a lot trying to
get the catnip out.

He was *very* laid back the rest of the evening.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...