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Max Pfleger
July 17th 08, 07:23 AM
My wife volunteers to help with the cats at a large animal shelter. We
have a cat and toy poodle at home.

What are the risks of her bringing a disease home from the shelter and
infecting one of our pets? Which diseases should we be particularly
worried about? What precautions should we take?

Any help would be appreciated. We have tried to get this information
from the shelter numerous times, but have not gotten any info at all so
far. She is knee deep in sick cats and their fluids for hours each day,
so we are quite concerned.

Pointers to any reputable medical articles would also be great.

Matthew[_3_]
July 17th 08, 01:18 PM
any disease can be brought back except ones that are bite transmitted

make sure you clean your hands with strong cleaner

your shoes and clothes can bring fleas carrying the diseases in

What I always did was have a set of clothes to work at the shelter I wore a
jump suit over them. I left the clothes at the shelter where the shelter
washed them for me. I wore booties and medical gloves and masks when
working around sick animals

I changed my clothes before I got home and threw them in the washer as soon
as I walked in the door and used tide with bleach to clean them, My shoes I
sprayed with an aerosol flea and tick killer and left them outside for a
little bit till they dried

Make sure all your animals have all their vaccinations plus flea, tick
medications regularly and make sure you don't start working there till the
waiting period is up but from what I read that is too late

I am making it sound bad but my furballs are my children and I am extremely
cautious when it comes to them got rid of two wives for them. I treated
working at one like working at chemical testing site

And of course the shelter won't tell you it would be a liability if they did

What medical articles no offense it should be common sense just look at a
hospital you go in healthy with something simple and can come out sick with
a secondary infection

"Max Pfleger" > wrote in message
g.com...
> My wife volunteers to help with the cats at a large animal shelter. We
> have a cat and toy poodle at home.
>
> What are the risks of her bringing a disease home from the shelter and
> infecting one of our pets? Which diseases should we be particularly
> worried about? What precautions should we take?
>
> Any help would be appreciated. We have tried to get this information
> from the shelter numerous times, but have not gotten any info at all so
> far. She is knee deep in sick cats and their fluids for hours each day,
> so we are quite concerned.
>
> Pointers to any reputable medical articles would also be great.
>

MaryL
July 17th 08, 02:32 PM
"Max Pfleger" > wrote in message
g.com...
> My wife volunteers to help with the cats at a large animal shelter. We
> have a cat and toy poodle at home.
>
> What are the risks of her bringing a disease home from the shelter and
> infecting one of our pets? Which diseases should we be particularly
> worried about? What precautions should we take?
>
> Any help would be appreciated. We have tried to get this information
> from the shelter numerous times, but have not gotten any info at all so
> far. She is knee deep in sick cats and their fluids for hours each day,
> so we are quite concerned.
>
> Pointers to any reputable medical articles would also be great.
>

I did some volunteer work at our shelter some years ago. I did not work
specifically with cats that were known to be sick, but I still had concerns
about bring disease home. I have an attached garage that leads directly
into the utility room (with washer and dryer). So, I would remove my shoes
and leave them in the garage. I used those shoes only for the shelter. I
kept a bathrobe in the utility room. As soon as I got into the utility
room, I would remove my clothes and toss them into the washer. I put the
robe on and immediately headed for the bathroom and took a bath.

MaryL

Rene S.
July 17th 08, 04:40 PM
> I did some volunteer work at our shelter some years ago. *I did not work
> specifically with cats that were known to be sick, but I still had concerns
> about bring disease home. *I have an attached garage that leads directly
> into the utility room (with washer and dryer). *So, I would remove my shoes
> and leave them in the garage. *I used those shoes only for the shelter. *I
> kept a bathrobe in the utility room. *As soon as I got into the utility
> room, I would remove my clothes and toss them into the washer. *I put the
> robe on and immediately headed for the bathroom and took a bath.

I did something similar to MaryL, though at the time I volunteered I
live in an apartment. The bathroom was right next to the door, so I'd
take my shoes off outside of the door and dash into the bathroom,
where I had a plastic bag and a clean set of clothes already laid out.
I'd shower and change, putting the dirty clothes inside the bag and
closing it up until I could do laundry.

Like Matthew said, common sense is really all you need.