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View Full Version : lump on back.. how to determine fibrosarcoma?


Brian Link
July 30th 08, 10:43 PM
....besides a biopsy, that is.

(I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)

So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
a feel for what the lump could be.

It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.

What else might it be? Abscess maybe?

We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
for Tiger.

Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
very active and otherwise a picture of health.

BLink
--------------------------
"The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"

cybercat
July 30th 08, 10:43 PM
"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>
> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>

Take him to a shelter. Anywhere would be better than with you, since you
know that you will not get him treatment, or even tests. [There is always a
way. Sell something on ebay, take ANY job. What would you do if this were
your child?

Back into my bozo bin with you. Ass.

cybercat
July 30th 08, 10:46 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Brian Link" > wrote in message
> ...
>> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>>

And another thing--what a stupid ****ing question. How would you suggest
finding out? A ouija board, maybe?

MaryL
July 30th 08, 11:14 PM
"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>
> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>
> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
> a feel for what the lump could be.
>
> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>
> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>
> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
> for Tiger.
>
> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>
> BLink
> --------------------------

Brian,

This is an impossible question to direct to a newsgroup. There is simply no
way to diagnose a cat this way. Even a vet could not do that. Tiger really
needs to be examined by a vet, and it needs to be done ASAP. If you are
lucky, it will be a cyst that is no problem. If not, you may catch
something in the early stages when treatment is both more effective and less
costly. Somehow or other, you need to find a way to get proper treatment
for a cat that has given you 14 years and hopefully will have many more.
Many vets will let us pay on an extended payment plan, especially if you
have established a long-term relationship. There are also some low-interest
credit cards available. But *please* recognize that evaluation by a
competent vet is not only "desirable"; it is essential.

MaryL

Brian Link
July 31st 08, 12:17 AM
On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 17:43:55 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
>> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>>
>> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
>> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>>
>
>Take him to a shelter. Anywhere would be better than with you, since you
>know that you will not get him treatment, or even tests. [There is always a
>way. Sell something on ebay, take ANY job. What would you do if this were
>your child?
>
>Back into my bozo bin with you. Ass.
>

Oh, PLEASE, put me back into your bozo bin! PLEASE! I'd love to post
something someday and actually find a useful response instead of your
obviously whiskey-fuelled trolls.

I would do something if this was my child. It is not, and there is no
medicaid or Cobra insurance that covers housepets. God you're an
idiot.

Put him in a shelter? Think they'll give him chemo? Or even diagnose
anything? That's preferable to me trying to find out some other
alternative or waiting till I can afford treatment?

You don't really give a **** about cats you heartless bitch. You don't
give a **** about people either.

You won't put me in your "bozo bin". I wouldn't be so lucky. I'll put
you in mine though - it's called "plonk". In the meantime, please die
in a fire.

BLink
"God created all tribes of men, and certainly had a righteous purpose in creating each"
- Geronimo

Brian Link
July 31st 08, 12:24 AM
On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 17:14:02 -0500, "MaryL"
-OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:

>
>"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
>> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>>
>> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
>> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>>
>> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
>> a feel for what the lump could be.
>>
>> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
>> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
>> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
>> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>>
>> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>>
>> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
>> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
>> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
>> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
>> for Tiger.
>>
>> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
>> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>>
>> BLink
>> --------------------------
>
>Brian,
>
>This is an impossible question to direct to a newsgroup. There is simply no
>way to diagnose a cat this way. Even a vet could not do that. Tiger really
>needs to be examined by a vet, and it needs to be done ASAP. If you are
>lucky, it will be a cyst that is no problem. If not, you may catch
>something in the early stages when treatment is both more effective and less
>costly. Somehow or other, you need to find a way to get proper treatment
>for a cat that has given you 14 years and hopefully will have many more.
>Many vets will let us pay on an extended payment plan, especially if you
>have established a long-term relationship. There are also some low-interest
>credit cards available. But *please* recognize that evaluation by a
>competent vet is not only "desirable"; it is essential.
>
>MaryL

Thanks Mary. That's the kind of feedback I was looking for.

I guess I'll start hitting up family members for some cash - the visit
is only "just" beyond our reach - I need to find out how much they
charge for the syringe biopsy.

Even then though - we had major surgery for Roy, and the sarcoma came
back. After $1000 and a month of rehabilitation, he got only an
additional year before we had to have him put down.

Damn. They're so strong and smart, and really delicate at the same
time.

BLink
"God created all tribes of men, and certainly had a righteous purpose in creating each"
- Geronimo

MaryL
July 31st 08, 12:48 AM
"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 17:14:02 -0500, "MaryL"
> -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
>>> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>>>
>>> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
>>> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>>>
>>> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
>>> a feel for what the lump could be.
>>>
>>> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
>>> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
>>> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
>>> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>>>
>>> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>>>
>>> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
>>> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
>>> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
>>> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
>>> for Tiger.
>>>
>>> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
>>> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>>>
>>> BLink
>>> --------------------------
>>
>>Brian,
>>
>>This is an impossible question to direct to a newsgroup. There is simply
>>no
>>way to diagnose a cat this way. Even a vet could not do that. Tiger
>>really
>>needs to be examined by a vet, and it needs to be done ASAP. If you are
>>lucky, it will be a cyst that is no problem. If not, you may catch
>>something in the early stages when treatment is both more effective and
>>less
>>costly. Somehow or other, you need to find a way to get proper treatment
>>for a cat that has given you 14 years and hopefully will have many more.
>>Many vets will let us pay on an extended payment plan, especially if you
>>have established a long-term relationship. There are also some
>>low-interest
>>credit cards available. But *please* recognize that evaluation by a
>>competent vet is not only "desirable"; it is essential.
>>
>>MaryL
>
> Thanks Mary. That's the kind of feedback I was looking for.
>
> I guess I'll start hitting up family members for some cash - the visit
> is only "just" beyond our reach - I need to find out how much they
> charge for the syringe biopsy.
>
> Even then though - we had major surgery for Roy, and the sarcoma came
> back. After $1000 and a month of rehabilitation, he got only an
> additional year before we had to have him put down.
>
> Damn. They're so strong and smart, and really delicate at the same
> time.
>
> BLink
> "God created all tribes of men, and certainly had a righteous purpose in
> creating each"
> - Geronimo

Thanks, Brian. Please keep us updated with results. We will all hope that
this is something benign and inconsequential. I had a cat that developed a
*huge* cyst when he was about 16 or 17 years old. Fortunately, all we had
to do was have it drained and there were no further problems. I hope
Tiger's will be something like that. (The cyst, as I remember it, was large
and black. It was on the side of his face and protruded upward. It was
also soft, movable, and did not seem to cause discomfort. However, it *was*
important to have it drained. The vet had me watch it for awhile but then
drained it because it was growing so large that it could have split and
caused infection. This was a great many years ago -- and my very first
cat -- so I no longer remember some of the details.)

MaryL

cshenk
July 31st 08, 01:38 AM
"MaryL" wrote

>>>> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
>>>> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
>>>> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
>>>> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>>>>
>>>> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?

Looking back now, have deleted several messages without really reading
them. Mea culpa.

Obviuously a vet visit is 'best' but here's what I have experienced.

Pulpy but not firm. More apt to be an abcess it seems and it will get firm
if not treated. Not expensive in the long run. Pretty much they lanced it
then there was an antibiotic that had to be given for I think 10 days with a
syringe. Have to see the vet to treat it.

In a house with multiple cats (some or all still naturally clawed atleast at
the back feet) this can happen from a puncture wound which leaves no outside
side any of us would see after a day or so. Can take a few weeks to build
up. Basically they make an puncture would then it seals up and leaves
infection behind 'under the skin' which slowly grows. Same can happen to us
humans.

Not to be ignored, but not a cancer. Should not wait to treat. Potential
blood poisioning from infection.

I've had a few occurances of this over the years with cats as i do not agree
with declawing and the only cats in my home who have been declawed, came to
me that way.

One scrap of advice from a vet many years ago. Not sure if related but not
'horrible' to pass on. If you have normal cats with normal claws, change
the cat litter OFTEN so they scritch about in a fairly clean environment and
carry less 'ick' that that can cause this on their claws. I do not know if
this is true, but it seemed very sensible to me in a multi-cat home and have
always followed it. I've rarely had problems since.

Hopefully this helps. It was meant to at least!

MaryL
July 31st 08, 02:10 AM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> "MaryL" wrote
>
>>>>> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
>>>>> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
>>>>> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
>>>>> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>>>>>
>>>>> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>
> Looking back now, have deleted several messages without really reading
> them. Mea culpa.
>
> Obviuously a vet visit is 'best' but here's what I have experienced.
>
> Pulpy but not firm. More apt to be an abcess it seems and it will get
> firm if not treated. Not expensive in the long run. Pretty much they
> lanced it then there was an antibiotic that had to be given for I think 10
> days with a syringe. Have to see the vet to treat it.
>
> In a house with multiple cats (some or all still naturally clawed atleast
> at the back feet) this can happen from a puncture wound which leaves no
> outside side any of us would see after a day or so. Can take a few weeks
> to build up. Basically they make an puncture would then it seals up and
> leaves infection behind 'under the skin' which slowly grows. Same can
> happen to us humans.
>
> Not to be ignored, but not a cancer. Should not wait to treat. Potential
> blood poisioning from infection.
>
> I've had a few occurances of this over the years with cats as i do not
> agree with declawing and the only cats in my home who have been declawed,
> came to me that way.
>
> One scrap of advice from a vet many years ago. Not sure if related but
> not 'horrible' to pass on. If you have normal cats with normal claws,
> change the cat litter OFTEN so they scritch about in a fairly clean
> environment and carry less 'ick' that that can cause this on their claws.
> I do not know if this is true, but it seemed very sensible to me in a
> multi-cat home and have always followed it. I've rarely had problems
> since.
>
> Hopefully this helps. It was meant to at least!
>

The original message came from Brian, not from me. That looks like good
information, though.

MaryL

Sherry
July 31st 08, 06:04 AM
On Jul 30, 4:43*pm, Brian Link > wrote:
> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>
> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>
> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
> a feel for what the lump could be.
>
> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>
> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>
> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
> for Tiger.
>
> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>
> BLink
> --------------------------
> "The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"

Vax-related sarcomas can appear as long as three years after the last
vaccination. It's very aggressive. The tumor will begin growing
"fingers"
down the back of the cat, and that makes it impossible to remove if
you
wait too long. There's a much better chance of removal if you don't
delay.
I am *not* an expert on the subject, but I do know a little about it
because
my daughter's cat has one. You really have no choice, IMO, but to see
a vet. It doesn't sound like an abscess to me. IME, abscesses *hurt*
-- my cats never let me touch one.

Sherry

news[_2_]
July 31st 08, 03:09 PM
"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>
> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>
> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
> a feel for what the lump could be.

There isn't.

Sherry
July 31st 08, 03:58 PM
On Jul 30, 4:43*pm, Brian Link > wrote:
> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>
> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>
> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
> a feel for what the lump could be.
>
> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>
> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>
> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
> for Tiger.
>
> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>
> BLink
> --------------------------
> "The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"

The thing is, you *have* to afford it. I realize I don't know your
situation, but you *did* just post 2 weeks ago about buying a new
computer, and from the phrase "much larger investment", I assume it's
not cheap.
I've seen people bring animals to the shelter with the "I can't
afford" excuse, and I
can't help looking beyond into the parking lot and seeing the gas-
guzzling, late model SUV they drove up in. Then it becomes a suspect
case of "I don't want to afford."
You can figure it out. A thousand dollars is easy to get if you've got
any credit at all. I've even had a vitual garage sale on e-bay once
and came up with nearly that much.
I do wish Tiger well. It could, like you say, be an abscess, or a
fatty tumor, for which biopsy & removal would probably be around $400
(here, but I realize vet scale varies greatly) He's managed to stay
healthy for fourteen years. You owe it to him.

Sherry

cybercat
July 31st 08, 05:33 PM
"Sherry" > wrote in message
...
On Jul 30, 4:43 pm, Brian Link > wrote:
> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>
> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>
> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
> a feel for what the lump could be.
>
> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>
> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>
> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
> for Tiger.
>
> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>
> BLink
> --------------------------
> "The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"

>The thing is, you *have* to afford it. I realize I don't know your
>situation, but you *did* just post 2 weeks ago about buying a new
>computer, and from the phrase "much larger investment", I assume it's
>not cheap.

Precisely. Again, if it were a child, what would he do? But worse, to have
the audacity to post about his intended neglect in a group where people
really care about their animals. Ugh.

Brian Link
August 2nd 08, 02:00 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 07:58:12 -0700 (PDT), Sherry >
wrote:

>On Jul 30, 4:43*pm, Brian Link > wrote:
>> ...besides a biopsy, that is.
>>
>> (I'm currently unemployed, and we can't afford an exam right now for
>> Tiger, let alone any surgery or testing.)
>>
>> So while I'm worrying, I wonder whether there's some other way to get
>> a feel for what the lump could be.
>>
>> It's about nickel-sized though oblong, above the muscle but below the
>> skin. It's located next to the spine but not on it, about an inch
>> anterior to the pelvis. It's "pulpy-feeling", can be moved around, and
>> doesn't appear to cause any discomfort.
>>
>> What else might it be? Abscess maybe?
>>
>> We lost a cat to fibrosarcoma several years back, and from the first
>> time we located Roy's mass it was very solid-feeling, pretty different
>> than Tiger's. I've been reading that Vaccination-related FS most often
>> appears within a few months of vaccination, and it's been a few years
>> for Tiger.
>>
>> Thanks for any ideas (and well-wishes). Tiger's around 14 but still
>> very active and otherwise a picture of health.
>>
>> BLink
>> --------------------------
>> "The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"
>
>The thing is, you *have* to afford it. I realize I don't know your
>situation, but you *did* just post 2 weeks ago about buying a new
>computer, and from the phrase "much larger investment", I assume it's
>not cheap.
>I've seen people bring animals to the shelter with the "I can't
>afford" excuse, and I
>can't help looking beyond into the parking lot and seeing the gas-
>guzzling, late model SUV they drove up in. Then it becomes a suspect
>case of "I don't want to afford."
>You can figure it out. A thousand dollars is easy to get if you've got
>any credit at all. I've even had a vitual garage sale on e-bay once
>and came up with nearly that much.
>I do wish Tiger well. It could, like you say, be an abscess, or a
>fatty tumor, for which biopsy & removal would probably be around $400
>(here, but I realize vet scale varies greatly) He's managed to stay
>healthy for fourteen years. You owe it to him.
>
>Sherry

Thanks, Sherry. It's hard to respond because I'm so ****ed about the
abuse I've gotten here.

I can't find any post where I mentioned buying a new computer.. I'm
wondering what you're thinking of. Lemme know where I said that.

This goes to a central puzzle with pet-owners: "pets: more important
than life?". Unemployed, I'm still getting money from side-gigs and
other sources. I can choose to buy tools for my trade (a computer, for
instance) and essentials (mortgage) or save my cat.

Now, it's not to that point right now. If Tiger has Fibrosarcoma
(though I'm far less worried about that after reading up on it)
there's precious little I can do for him. Buy him a few months,
possibly. 14 years is a good run for a cat.

But when looking at finances, as much as I love Tiger, I'm not willing
to sacrifice my home to him, my son's college education, nor am I
willing to forestall getting a job that can pay the mortgage and make
me competitive in the job market on his behalf. If he were 5 or 6,
that would be a struggle. At his age, he's had a good life. Radical
surgery (of the type suggested for fibrosarcoma) would lay him up for
weeks, and most likely only buy him back those weeks of longevity.

If someone told me "you're gonna die in 2 years. You can either have
this surgery which will leave you in crippling pain for six months and
buy you six months more, or just let the disease take its course and
die in 2 years", I think I'd take the non-surgery.

I will sacrifice (and have sacrificed) for my cats. Abbey's cancer
surgery was $1800 and gave her 2 years with a 1 month recuperation
period. That was money that I had, and it was well-spent. But at the
heart of it, these are wonderful but short-lived animals, who get no
real value out of painful convalescence.

If we'd left Tiger where we found him (actually, where my son found
him), he'd have been a farm-cat that would have died years earlier in
the jaws of a coyote. He's an important little creature, who's learned
our mysterious human ways, but the hard truth is that he's not as
important as my having a job and house to live in. He's not a person.

If you could save a baby or a cat from a burning building, which would
you choose?

I guess I should find some web forums for cat-health. Having assholes
like Cybercat give me **** when I'm so worried about my friend Tiger,
and doing the best I can, means I prolly should just cross off
r.p.c.h+b from my list of resources.

BLink
"The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest
exercises in moral philosophy; that is,
the search for a superior moral justification
for selfishness."

- John Kenneth Galbraith

MaryL
August 2nd 08, 03:01 AM
"Brian Link" > wrote in message
...
<snip>
> Now, it's not to that point right now. If Tiger has Fibrosarcoma
> (though I'm far less worried about that after reading up on it)
> there's precious little I can do for him. Buy him a few months,
> possibly. 14 years is a good run for a cat.
<snip>
> BLink
>

Brian, don't be so quick to think of 14 years as if Tiger were almost at the
end of his life based on longevity. At least, it sounds like you are
thinking along those lines (as if Tiger didn't have long to live even
without a medical problem). Many cats live *much* longer lives than that.
My cat that lived to age 20 did not even begin to show any signs of aging
until he was 18-1/2. Many cats live well into their 20s if they are indoor
cats that receive good care. That is even true of some outdoor cats, but
the percentages are very different.

MaryL

Rhonda[_3_]
August 3rd 08, 04:10 AM
Brian Link wrote:

> Thanks, Sherry. It's hard to respond because I'm so ****ed about the
> abuse I've gotten here.
>
> I can't find any post where I mentioned buying a new computer.. I'm
> wondering what you're thinking of. Lemme know where I said that.


Brian,

Just because I like a challenge... it was on mn.general on July 15.

Rhonda

Brian Link
August 4th 08, 12:31 AM
On Sun, 03 Aug 2008 03:10:35 GMT, Rhonda
> wrote:

>
>
>Brian Link wrote:
>
>> Thanks, Sherry. It's hard to respond because I'm so ****ed about the
>> abuse I've gotten here.
>>
>> I can't find any post where I mentioned buying a new computer.. I'm
>> wondering what you're thinking of. Lemme know where I said that.
>
>
>Brian,
>
>Just because I like a challenge... it was on mn.general on July 15.
>
>Rhonda

Okay - I put up the white flag. At the time I wrote that post I fully
expected to be employed within the week. That obviously didn't happen.
Have you ever shopped for something you couldn't currently afford? No?
I haven't bought a computer because I'm broke and still unemployed.
Not a bad idea to shop, though, especially if there's some inexpensive
upgrade that could make my at-home training more efficient.

Still boils down to Maslow's pyramid: First thing, I need to afford my
home. Then I need to afford food for my family. Next is looking at the
tools I need to get work again. After those things are taken care of,
I can think about paying for vet-care.

Tiger is poorly-served by my being unemployed, especially given the
usurous fees our vet requires.FIrst thing is to get a job, next is
taking care of my family, and next is taking care of the pets.

Good catch, though.

BLink
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"The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"