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jmc
August 10th 08, 01:47 AM
Quite possible nobody knows the answer to this, since luxating patellas
are so rare in cats...

Meep has this problem. Both hind legs. Pretty sure she's also starting
to get arthritis, based on the way she moves sometimes. She's 12.
She's getting Dr. Fosters & Smith Joint Care 2.

My understanding is, increased exercise is best for arthritis. I also
know that when a horse has luxating patellas (stifle lock), exercise -
hill work, mostly - is indicated to strengthen the muscles and reduce
the problem.

But the problem is different in cats, I understand, so I'm not sure if
exercise is indicated for stifle lock in cats.

We've moved from a single-story house to a three-story house; been here
about a month. I'm wondering whether this will help or hurt Meep's
issues? She's not hesitating to climb stairs (litterbox is now in the
basement, her food is on the main floor, and we sleep on the second
floor), but the way she climbs the stairs sometimes makes me worry about
her. Then again, I'm a hypochondriac when it comes to her :)

I'm also worried I might hurt her unintentionally, when we play with her
string. Floors are hardwood. She jumps after it with wild abandon, and
I'm afraid she'll hurt herself. I think in her mind, she's still a
kitten :) (in my mind, I'm still about 19, so I can relate <g>).

So, anybody have any experience with this, or advice?

jmc

Phil P.
August 10th 08, 05:09 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Quite possible nobody knows the answer to this, since luxating patellas
> are so rare in cats...
>
> Meep has this problem. Both hind legs. Pretty sure she's also starting
> to get arthritis, based on the way she moves sometimes. She's 12.
> She's getting Dr. Fosters & Smith Joint Care 2.
>
> My understanding is, increased exercise is best for arthritis. I also
> know that when a horse has luxating patellas (stifle lock), exercise -
> hill work, mostly - is indicated to strengthen the muscles and reduce
> the problem.
>
> But the problem is different in cats, I understand, so I'm not sure if
> exercise is indicated for stifle lock in cats.

No. Rest. See below.


>
> We've moved from a single-story house to a three-story house; been here
> about a month. I'm wondering whether this will help or hurt Meep's
> issues? She's not hesitating to climb stairs (litterbox is now in the
> basement, her food is on the main floor, and we sleep on the second
> floor), but the way she climbs the stairs sometimes makes me worry about
> her. Then again, I'm a hypochondriac when it comes to her :)
>
> I'm also worried I might hurt her unintentionally, when we play with her
> string. Floors are hardwood. She jumps after it with wild abandon, and
> I'm afraid she'll hurt herself. I think in her mind, she's still a
> kitten :) (in my mind, I'm still about 19, so I can relate <g>).
>
> So, anybody have any experience with this, or advice?
>
> jmc

Patellar luxations in cats are usually graded 1-4. Did your vet give Meep's
a grade? Sounds like a Grade 2 or possibly a cruciate ligament injury to me-
which is not all that common but its more likey in an older cat. Here's how
PLs are graded:

Grade 1: infrequent luxation, infrequent lameness, leg strait, patella tends
to be in proper location.
Grade 2: frequent luxation, patella usually out of place, rotation of the
limb present but overall the cat does well.
Grade 3: patella luxated and fixed in luxated position, animal still most
often uses limb but lameness may be present, abnormal rotations of limb
present.
Grade 4: patella luxated and fixed with severe twisting of limb and moderate
lameness.

Which one do you think best describes Meep's?

Grade 1 and some Grade 2s usually require only rest- and if necessary,
confinement to enforce the rest until the inflammation subsides. More
serious Grade 2s and some Grade 3s usually require pain medication. Most
Grade 3s & all Grade 4s almost always require surgery.

Phil

jmc
August 10th 08, 09:42 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (8/10/2008 12:09 AM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Quite possible nobody knows the answer to this, since luxating patellas
>> are so rare in cats...
>>
>> Meep has this problem. Both hind legs. Pretty sure she's also starting
>> to get arthritis, based on the way she moves sometimes. She's 12.
>> She's getting Dr. Fosters & Smith Joint Care 2.
>>
>> My understanding is, increased exercise is best for arthritis. I also
>> know that when a horse has luxating patellas (stifle lock), exercise -
>> hill work, mostly - is indicated to strengthen the muscles and reduce
>> the problem.
>>
>> But the problem is different in cats, I understand, so I'm not sure if
>> exercise is indicated for stifle lock in cats.
>
> No. Rest. See below.
>
>
>> We've moved from a single-story house to a three-story house; been here
>> about a month. I'm wondering whether this will help or hurt Meep's
>> issues? She's not hesitating to climb stairs (litterbox is now in the
>> basement, her food is on the main floor, and we sleep on the second
>> floor), but the way she climbs the stairs sometimes makes me worry about
>> her. Then again, I'm a hypochondriac when it comes to her :)
>>
>> I'm also worried I might hurt her unintentionally, when we play with her
>> string. Floors are hardwood. She jumps after it with wild abandon, and
>> I'm afraid she'll hurt herself. I think in her mind, she's still a
>> kitten :) (in my mind, I'm still about 19, so I can relate <g>).
>>
>> So, anybody have any experience with this, or advice?
>>
>> jmc
>
> Patellar luxations in cats are usually graded 1-4. Did your vet give Meep's
> a grade? Sounds like a Grade 2 or possibly a cruciate ligament injury to me-
> which is not all that common but its more likey in an older cat. Here's how
> PLs are graded:
>
> Grade 1: infrequent luxation, infrequent lameness, leg strait, patella tends
> to be in proper location.
> Grade 2: frequent luxation, patella usually out of place, rotation of the
> limb present but overall the cat does well.
> Grade 3: patella luxated and fixed in luxated position, animal still most
> often uses limb but lameness may be present, abnormal rotations of limb
> present.
> Grade 4: patella luxated and fixed with severe twisting of limb and moderate
> lameness.
>
> Which one do you think best describes Meep's?
>
> Grade 1 and some Grade 2s usually require only rest- and if necessary,
> confinement to enforce the rest until the inflammation subsides. More
> serious Grade 2s and some Grade 3s usually require pain medication. Most
> Grade 3s & all Grade 4s almost always require surgery.
>
> Phil
>
>
>

Vet didn't give a grade. She was originally diagnosed in England,
circa, oh, 2003 or so. I'd say Grade 1, perhaps 1.5. It doesn't stick
much - in fact hasn't in months that I've seen. When it does, she does
limp, and comes to me - I can pick up that leg in such a way as to pop
it back, then she walks off sound.

However, when diagnosed (she landed badly from a jump, necessitating a
vet visit), vet commented that it was easy for her to pop 'em out. I
know that rest is indicated if she's had an "episode", what I'm asking
about is essentially "maintenance".

With horses, exercise is indicated to strengthen the muscles and tendons
that help hold the kneecap in the proper position. I've cared for
horses with stifle lock, twice. One was a Standardbred filly who locked
terrible bad, even cantering, and I believe she did eventually get the
operation. The other was a young Arab gelding who locked mildly, vet
had me riding him up and down hills. He went on to be a capable team
penning horse, I believe, and did not require surgery.

Not sure what "twisting of the limb" means. Her leg bones are somewhat
bowed, and she walks cow-hocked. Always has. I believe her "deformed"
leg structure is why her kneecaps can pop out of position.

jmc

Phil P.
August 11th 08, 10:25 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...

> Vet didn't give a grade. She was originally diagnosed in England,
> circa, oh, 2003 or so. I'd say Grade 1, perhaps 1.5. It doesn't stick
> much - in fact hasn't in months that I've seen. When it does, she does
> limp, and comes to me - I can pick up that leg in such a way as to pop
> it back, then she walks off sound.
>
> However, when diagnosed (she landed badly from a jump, necessitating a
> vet visit), vet commented that it was easy for her to pop 'em out. I
> know that rest is indicated if she's had an "episode", what I'm asking
> about is essentially "maintenance".

You might to try to keep her from jumping down - if that's possible) to
reduce the risks of an episode- and probably try to limit (as if that's
even possible) her activity for a few days after an episode.


>
> With horses, exercise is indicated to strengthen the muscles and tendons
> that help hold the kneecap in the proper position. I've cared for
> horses with stifle lock, twice. One was a Standardbred filly who locked
> terrible bad, even cantering, and I believe she did eventually get the
> operation. The other was a young Arab gelding who locked mildly, vet
> had me riding him up and down hills. He went on to be a capable team
> penning horse, I believe, and did not require surgery.
>
> Not sure what "twisting of the limb" means.

Paws facing outward.


Her leg bones are somewhat
> bowed, and she walks cow-hocked. Always has.

PL is also genetic in some cats- its inherited. The jump and subsequent
injury may have just aggravated or exacerbated a preexisting condition.

I believe her "deformed"
> leg structure is why her kneecaps can pop out of position.

How long has this been happening?

Phil

jmc
August 12th 08, 01:05 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Phil P. exclaimed (8/11/2008 5:25 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>> Vet didn't give a grade. She was originally diagnosed in England,
>> circa, oh, 2003 or so. I'd say Grade 1, perhaps 1.5. It doesn't stick
>> much - in fact hasn't in months that I've seen. When it does, she does
>> limp, and comes to me - I can pick up that leg in such a way as to pop
>> it back, then she walks off sound.
>>
>> However, when diagnosed (she landed badly from a jump, necessitating a
>> vet visit), vet commented that it was easy for her to pop 'em out. I
>> know that rest is indicated if she's had an "episode", what I'm asking
>> about is essentially "maintenance".
>
> You might to try to keep her from jumping down - if that's possible) to
> reduce the risks of an episode- and probably try to limit (as if that's
> even possible) her activity for a few days after an episode.
>
>
>> With horses, exercise is indicated to strengthen the muscles and tendons
>> that help hold the kneecap in the proper position. I've cared for
>> horses with stifle lock, twice. One was a Standardbred filly who locked
>> terrible bad, even cantering, and I believe she did eventually get the
>> operation. The other was a young Arab gelding who locked mildly, vet
>> had me riding him up and down hills. He went on to be a capable team
>> penning horse, I believe, and did not require surgery.
>>
>> Not sure what "twisting of the limb" means.
>
> Paws facing outward.
>
>
> Her leg bones are somewhat
>> bowed, and she walks cow-hocked. Always has.
>
> PL is also genetic in some cats- its inherited. The jump and subsequent
> injury may have just aggravated or exacerbated a preexisting condition.
>
> I believe her "deformed"
>> leg structure is why her kneecaps can pop out of position.
>
> How long has this been happening?
>
> Phil
>
>

She's been bowlegged/cowhocked her whole life. Her hind paws do point
outwards. What is PL? Did you mean LP? She was diagnosed with
luxating patellas in 2004, I think, when she was about 8.

It's been quite some time since she last came up lame, and asked me to
fix it, and that was in our single-story home.

Yea, keeping her from jumping around is an exercise in futility. We're
on 3 stories now, and no way to block her from any of them. I tried
buying her a spiral tree to replace the one she has to jump in to, but
she won't use it at all :(

jmc