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AKT
August 12th 08, 07:14 PM
I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:

How much does one cost?

What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?

How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?

Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
etc? Does that mean another surgery?

Thanks.

Matthew[_3_]
August 12th 08, 07:42 PM
"AKT" > wrote in message
...
>I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>
> How much does one cost?

depends 25 to 75 sometimes lees sometimes more depends on wher eyou are
in the world
>
> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?
>
any of them


> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?
>
none pinch your skin how long does ittake to stop hurting


> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
> etc? Does that mean another surgery?
>
electronically can be changed best advice add your vets info and phone
number to it also just in case you forget


> Thanks.

Rene S.
August 12th 08, 08:08 PM
> How much does one cost?

It depends where you go. It can range from $20-50-ish.

> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?

The choice really is up to you. If you're more comfortable having your
vet do it, do it there. I chose to get mine done at the local shelter
($20 donation). I'd rather give the money to them vs a vet's office.

> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?

Very simple procedure. They inject a small device, about the size of a
grain of rice, between the shoulders. Quick and nearly painless. No
downtime at all.

> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
> etc? Does that mean another surgery?

When you get the chip implanted, the office will give you paperwork.
You need to fill out this paperwork and return it to the chip provider
to put in their master database. You'll also need to send a check in
to cover the fee(s). If your address changes, call the chip company
and they will update your address.

BTW, it's worth checking into what brand of chip companies before you
have it done. I chose Avis, as it's become one of the most common
brands. With Avis, there's a one-time fee to register your pet. With
other companies, like Home Again, you'll an annual fee. Just something
to consider.

Rene

Ivor Jones[_2_]
August 12th 08, 08:09 PM
In ,
AKT > typed, for some strange, unexplained reason:
: I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
:
: How much does one cost?

It varies depending on where you go. At our shelter we microchip all cats
when they leave, the cost is borne by us and the adopting owner makes a
donation.

: What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to
: a shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?

It's not a difficult technique but you want it done by somebody who has
been properly trained. I'd go for a vet if you're at all anxious.

: How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after
: it?

No, none at all. It's no more than an injection, albeit with a rather
large needle (think blood donation size).

: Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
: etc? Does that mean another surgery?

No, you simply update your details on the database, which is held by the
microchip company.

Ivor

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
August 12th 08, 09:09 PM
"AKT" > wrote in message
...
>I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>
> How much does one cost?
>
> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?
>
> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?
>
> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
> etc? Does that mean another surgery?

I had my cat's chip removed. They call it the "cancer chip" and the company
that makes it is a very dubious enterprise to say the least. If you ask me,
don't do it. Cats don't typically run away and get lost like dogs do.

Paul

Manfred Mann
August 12th 08, 09:23 PM
On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 14:42:47 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>
>"AKT" > wrote in message
...
>>I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>>
>> How much does one cost?
>
> depends 25 to 75 sometimes lees sometimes more depends on wher eyou are
>in the world
>>
>> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
>> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?
>>
>any of them
I'd suggest going through your vet. 1. the vet has a record of the
information, and 2 I got a cat chpped at my vet it was $69.00
complete no extra charge, my newest cat was chipped at the shelter
and it was included in the price but also came with a hefty yearly
renewal charge.

Also when I got the last cat I was concerned about how well the
chip was inserted (I had to have the vet fix it later on.)



>
>
>> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?
>>
>none pinch your skin how long does ittake to stop hurting
Think of injection with a huge honkin' needle.....


>
>
>> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
>> etc? Does that mean another surgery?
>>
>electronically can be changed best advice add your vets info and phone
>number to it also just in case you forget
>
>
>> Thanks.
>
My vet has a complete record of all my chips.

Manfred Mann
August 12th 08, 09:32 PM
On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 20:09:28 +0100, "Ivor Jones"
> wrote:

>In ,
>AKT > typed, for some strange, unexplained reason:
>: I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>:
>: How much does one cost?
>
>It varies depending on where you go. At our shelter we microchip all cats
>when they leave, the cost is borne by us and the adopting owner makes a
>donation.

And be forewarned, the shelter does not lit a finger to assist
you when the chip isn't inserted right.
>: Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
>: etc? Does that mean another surgery?
>
>No, you simply update your details on the database, which is held by the
>microchip company.
Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
compromised?

(Think TJX and other massive breaches.)

(Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
your pet breaks into your home.)


>
>Ivor

jmc
August 12th 08, 10:04 PM
Suddenly, without warning, AKT exclaimed (8/12/2008 2:14 PM):
> I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>
> How much does one cost?
>

Meep's was done in 1999, in England, so my cost won't be useful.

> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?
>

Don't think it matters.
> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?
>

Tiny. No worse than having a shot, no down time. Meep didn't even notice.

> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
> etc? Does that mean another surgery?
>

The only thing the chip provides is a number. In order for that number
to be useful, it has to be in a database somewheres. Here in the US,
once you've paid the initial fees, you can update the dbs for life. I
registered Meep at www.homeagain.com and akccar.org back in 2001, and
then left the US in 2003. We just came back, and I was able to get into
both, online, and update her information. Didn't cost me anything to do
the updates.

FYI, many countries have national registries. This is much better,
imho, because the vet knows to look in one place to find the pet, if
they have a chip.

Also FYI, neither Meep nor I have particularly noticed the chip for all
these years. Sometimes when I give her a deep shoulder massage I can
feel it, but she doesn't notice that I can :)

> Thanks.

You are welcome.

jmc & Meep the TravelCat

jmc
August 12th 08, 10:07 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 4:09 PM):
> "AKT" > wrote in message
> ...
>> I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>>
>> How much does one cost?
>>
>> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
>> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?
>>
>> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?
>>
>> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
>> etc? Does that mean another surgery?
>
> I had my cat's chip removed. They call it the "cancer chip" and the company
> that makes it is a very dubious enterprise to say the least. If you ask me,
> don't do it. Cats don't typically run away and get lost like dogs do.
>
> Paul
>
>

Meep's had her chip for nearly 10 years now, no problems at all. She
enjoys deep shoulder massages, so if something was growing there, I'd
certainly notice. So would the vet on her yearly visit.

Dubious "they" statements... can you provide a reliable source on who
"they" are, and statistics on how many animals have gotten cancer from
these implants (not just cats, but horses and dogs get these chips)?

jmc

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
August 12th 08, 10:29 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 4:09 PM):
>> "AKT" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
>>>
>>> How much does one cost?
>>>
>>> What's the best (cost+safety) place to get one? I mean should I go to a
>>> shelter, or a vet, or a place like Petsmart?
>>>
>>> How big a procedure is it, is there a significant "down time" after it?
>>>
>>> Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the address/phone
>>> etc? Does that mean another surgery?
>>
>> I had my cat's chip removed. They call it the "cancer chip" and the
>> company that makes it is a very dubious enterprise to say the least. If
>> you ask me, don't do it. Cats don't typically run away and get lost like
>> dogs do.
>>
>> Paul
>>
>>
>
> Meep's had her chip for nearly 10 years now, no problems at all. She
> enjoys deep shoulder massages, so if something was growing there, I'd
> certainly notice. So would the vet on her yearly visit.
>
> Dubious "they" statements... can you provide a reliable source on who
> "they" are, and statistics on how many animals have gotten cancer from
> these implants (not just cats, but horses and dogs get these chips)?



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 3, 2008

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Group's Latest Report Sets Record Straight on Chip Implants, Cancer, and
more

Opponents of the VeriChip implant are launching a new offensive against
the controversial human microchip this week, amid reports that VeriChip
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titled "Microchip Implants: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions"
released today by CASPIAN Consumer Privacy reveals dirty laundry the
company would probably rather keep hidden as it seeks a buyer for its
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The 42-page report was authored by CASPIAN director Dr. Katherine
Albrecht, a Harvard-educated privacy expert and long-time critic of the
VeriChip. The highlight of the report is an eleven-page section titled
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deception engaged by VeriChip executives in an effort to downplay the
fact that implantable microchips cause cancer in laboratory animals.

The report reveals how news outlets like Time Magazine, Business Week,
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publications has repeated misstatements from VeriChip company
executives, in many cases printing the inaccurate statements verbatim
and unchallenged.

"These were not subjective issues, they were plainly verifiable issues
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VeriChip's media efforts have done little to salvage the company's
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shun the device that many are now calling the "cancer chip."

Investors have also distanced themselves from the failing company, with
VeriChip's stock plummeting from a high of $10.62 last year to just over
$2.00 today.

VeriChip's VP of business development, Jay McKeage, acknowledged the
implant division suffers from "a substantial cash burn" and is "not
sustainable on its own." As a result, he says, VeriChip plans to "shop
the VeriMed / Health Link [human implantable chip] business around
widely" in hopes that another company will take the unpopular product
off its hands.

However, with recent blog headlines like "VeriChip Death Watch" making
the rounds, Albrecht has a hard time imagining who, if anyone, will want
to buy the business.

"This is a company that has engaged in a consistent pattern of making
false and misleading statements," she said. "It has lied to the public,
to the media, to its shareholders, and to regulatory agencies," she
said, citing additional evidence from the report indicating that
VeriChip hid cancer evidence from the FDA when the agency reviewed the
implant's safety in 2004.

"We laid out all the evidence in our report," she added. "We want to
make sure no one else gets burned by VeriChip."

================================================== ===========
ABOUT THE REPORT

CASPIAN's new report, "Microchip Implants: Answers to Frequently Asked
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The report concludes with a list of recommendations for patients, pet
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The new report is available for free download on the group's
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While on the website, readers are encouraged to download Dr. Albrecht's
comprehensive 52-page overview of the studies, "Microchip-Induced Tumors
in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990-2006,"
and to review scanned copies of the original documents.


================================================== ===================
ABOUT CASPIAN

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering) is a
grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes since 1999
and irresponsible RFID use since 2002. With thousands of members in all 50
U.S. states and over 30 countries worldwide, CASPIAN seeks to educate
consumers about marketing strategies that invade their
privacy and encourage privacy-conscious shopping habits across the retail
spectrum.

http://www.spychips.com/
http://www.antichips.com/
http://www.nocards.org/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

================================================== ===================

To subscribe or unsubscribe to the Caspian-newsletter-l mailing list, click
the following link or copy and paste it into your browser:
http://mailman.nocards.org/mailman/listinfo/caspian-newsletter-l

If you have difficulty with the web-based interface, you may also
subscribe or unsubscribe via email by writing to:


================================================== ===================

Janet
August 12th 08, 11:08 PM
"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message

> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
> your pet breaks into your home.)

Um, why would a missing cat trigger a home invasion? Very strange way to
select a target on the part of the burglars.

Matthew[_3_]
August 12th 08, 11:25 PM
"Janet" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
>
>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>
> Um, why would a missing cat trigger a home invasion? Very strange way to
> select a target on the part of the burglars.


I think this person is not playing with a full deck

Manfred Mann
August 12th 08, 11:52 PM
On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 18:08:10 -0400, "Janet" >
wrote:

>
>"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
>
>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>
>Um, why would a missing cat trigger a home invasion? Very strange way to
>select a target on the part of the burglars.
>
Here is a hint: the perp gets your personal information: knows that
your house will be empty since you'll be looking for the lost
pet YOU JUST REPORTED TO THEM.

If he broke into the computer to get your personal inforamtion he
also knows that you just reported the pet missing.

So your house will be empty so the perp can take his time.

I don't know where you live but here in this part of the US of A
people watch for on line ads for lost pets and then prey on the
vulnerable owners. I'm glad you live in an area that doesn't
have those problems.

Manfred Mann
August 12th 08, 11:56 PM
On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 18:25:58 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:
>
>
>I think this person is not playing with a full deck
>
Maybe you should look into people who are victimized
after placing lost pet ads.

Here in this part of the US of A it's a huge problem.

And in this tough economny people are stealing even
more dogs and cats.

Matthew[_3_]
August 13th 08, 12:39 AM
"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 18:25:58 -0400, "Matthew"
> > wrote:
>>
>>
>>I think this person is not playing with a full deck
>>
> Maybe you should look into people who are victimized
> after placing lost pet ads.
>
> Here in this part of the US of A it's a huge problem.
>
> And in this tough economny people are stealing even
> more dogs and cats.

Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that and I
watch the news all the time
Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more than
your phone number on the lost ad
And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
pedigrees and that has been going on for decades

Janet
August 13th 08, 01:09 AM
"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 18:08:10 -0400, "Janet" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
>>
>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>
>>Um, why would a missing cat trigger a home invasion? Very strange way to
>>select a target on the part of the burglars.
>>
> Here is a hint: the perp gets your personal information: knows that
> your house will be empty since you'll be looking for the lost
> pet YOU JUST REPORTED TO THEM.
>
> If he broke into the computer to get your personal inforamtion he
> also knows that you just reported the pet missing.
>
> So your house will be empty so the perp can take his time.
>
> I don't know where you live but here in this part of the US of A
> people watch for on line ads for lost pets and then prey on the
> vulnerable owners. I'm glad you live in an area that doesn't
> have those problems.
>

Where I live, many people never lock their doors, and some people I know go
on vacation and leave the doors unlocked.

Outsider
August 13th 08, 01:20 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in
:

>
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 4:09
>> PM):
>>> "AKT" > wrote in message
>>.
..
..
.......Biased nonsense deleted
..
>
> ================================================== ===================



Doesn't your aluminum skull-cap protect you againt the chip's bad effects?

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
August 13th 08, 04:47 AM
"outsider" > wrote in message
...
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in
> :
>
>>
>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 4:09
>>> PM):
>>>> "AKT" > wrote in message
>>>.
> .
> .
> ......Biased nonsense deleted
> .
>>
>> ================================================== ===================
>
>
>
> Doesn't your aluminum skull-cap protect you againt the chip's bad effects?

Right. Faked test results of a cancer study. Positively crazy to assume
they had anything to hide. I'm sure there is a perfectly reasonable
explanation.

Paul

Ivor Jones[_2_]
August 13th 08, 04:59 AM
In ,
Manfred Mann > typed, for some strange, unexplained
reason:
: On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 20:09:28 +0100, "Ivor Jones"
: > wrote:
:
: >In ,
: >AKT > typed, for some strange, unexplained reason:
: >: I have a few newbie questions re microchip identification:
: >:
: >: How much does one cost?
: >
: >It varies depending on where you go. At our shelter we microchip all
: >cats when they leave, the cost is borne by us and the adopting owner
: >makes a donation.
:
: And be forewarned, the shelter does not lit a finger to assist
: you when the chip isn't inserted right.

Maybe where you live, not here. We do it right.

: >: Finally, what happens if we move and have to change the
: >: address/phone etc? Does that mean another surgery?
: >
: >No, you simply update your details on the database, which is held by
: >the microchip company.

: Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
: compromised?
:
: (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)

No different from any of the other million-and-one databases you're on,
then.

: (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
: and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
: your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
: you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
: your pet breaks into your home.)

That's not how it works. You find a cat, take it to a vet or some other
organisation with a scanner. *They* contact the database and inform the
owner, the owner's details are not released to the finder.


Ivor

J a c k
August 13th 08, 05:24 AM
Manfred Mann wrote:


> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
> compromised?
>
> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>
> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
> your pet breaks into your home.)


What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You can't
be followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable as
a target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
content of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed
on the chip?

What exactly would be the threat?


Jack

Manfred Mann
August 13th 08, 07:48 AM
On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:
>Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that and I
>watch the news all the time
>Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more than
>your phone number on the lost ad
>And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>
Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.

I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.

Manfred Mann
August 13th 08, 07:51 AM
On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 20:09:41 -0400, "Janet" >
wrote:

>
>"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
...
>> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 18:08:10 -0400, "Janet" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
>>>
>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>
>>>Um, why would a missing cat trigger a home invasion? Very strange way to
>>>select a target on the part of the burglars.
>>>
>> Here is a hint: the perp gets your personal information: knows that
>> your house will be empty since you'll be looking for the lost
>> pet YOU JUST REPORTED TO THEM.
>>
>> If he broke into the computer to get your personal inforamtion he
>> also knows that you just reported the pet missing.
>>
>> So your house will be empty so the perp can take his time.
>>
>> I don't know where you live but here in this part of the US of A
>> people watch for on line ads for lost pets and then prey on the
>> vulnerable owners. I'm glad you live in an area that doesn't
>> have those problems.
>>
>
>Where I live, many people never lock their doors, and some people I know go
>on vacation and leave the doors unlocked.
>

I'm glad you live a crime free location, around here people have
two, three, four locks etc. bars on the windows, alarms, etc.
and they still come home to find their house/apartment broken into.

CatNipped[_2_]
August 13th 08, 02:01 PM
"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
> Manfred Mann wrote:
>
>
>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>> compromised?
>>
>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>
>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while you're
>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>
>
> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You can't be
> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable as a
> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the content
> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
> chip?
>
> What exactly would be the threat?
>
>
> Jack

With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft - I
spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

J a c k
August 13th 08, 02:53 PM
Manfred Mann wrote:


> I'm glad you live a crime free location, around here people have
> two, three, four locks etc. bars on the windows, alarms, etc.
> and they still come home to find their house/apartment broken into.


Aha! A place where the good people are disarmed by misguided anti-gun
laws, and only the criminals have weapons. What are you doing about it?


Jack

Maia Rutledge
August 13th 08, 03:50 PM
On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:

>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>> compromised?
>>>
>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>
>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while you're
>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>
>>
>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You can't be
>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable as a
>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the content
>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>> chip?
>>
>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>
>>
>> Jack
>
>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft - I
>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>
>Hugs,
>
>CatNipped
>
Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
cats they would be stolen.

Manfred Mann
August 13th 08, 03:52 PM
On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:53:31 -0500, J a c k >
wrote:

>Manfred Mann wrote:
>
>
>> I'm glad you live a crime free location, around here people have
>> two, three, four locks etc. bars on the windows, alarms, etc.
>> and they still come home to find their house/apartment broken into.
>
>
>Aha! A place where the good people are disarmed by misguided anti-gun
>laws, and only the criminals have weapons. What are you doing about it?
>
>
>Jack

And in this instance gun ownership would make no difference. The
cats/dogs are stolen while they are in the yards in the vicinity.

Or they are stolen while you're at work.

Matthew[_3_]
August 13th 08, 06:01 PM
"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
> > wrote:
>>Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that and I
>>watch the news all the time
>>Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more than
>>your phone number on the lost ad
>>And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>>pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>>
> Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
> they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.
>
> I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.
>

Dud get on some medication

Matthew[_3_]
August 13th 08, 06:03 PM
"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> > wrote:
>
>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>> compromised?
>>>>
>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>
>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>> you're
>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>
>>>
>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You can't
>>> be
>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable as
>>> a
>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the content
>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>>> chip?
>>>
>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>
>>>
>>> Jack
>>
>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft - I
>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>
>>Hugs,
>>
>>CatNipped
>>
> Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
> there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
> cats they would be stolen.


What do you live in New York by China town or something. They do have
medication to help that paranoia

jmc
August 13th 08, 10:04 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 11:47 PM):
> "outsider" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 4:09
>>>> PM):
>>>>> "AKT" > wrote in message
>>>> .
>> .
>> .
>> ......Biased nonsense deleted
>> .
>>> ================================================== ===================
>>
>>
>> Doesn't your aluminum skull-cap protect you againt the chip's bad effects?
>
> Right. Faked test results of a cancer study. Positively crazy to assume
> they had anything to hide. I'm sure there is a perfectly reasonable
> explanation.
>
> Paul
>
>

Well, I haven't followed up on the provided links (thank you) but I'm
still doubting the veracity. Aside from the fact that VeriChip is only
*one* microchip company, and not even the biggest. Or second biggest.

I did a bit of my own research, both pro and con. You've already
provided plenty of con. I found this - the quote in the first paragraph
is especially important, I think:

"Dr. Cheryl London, a veterinarian oncologist at Ohio State University,
noted: "It's much easier to cause cancer in mice than it is in people.
So it may be that what you're seeing in mice represents an exaggerated
phenomenon of what may occur in people."

Tens of thousands of dogs have been chipped, she said, and veterinary
pathologists haven't reported outbreaks of related sarcomas in the area
of the neck, where canine implants are often done. (Published reports
detailing malignant tumors in two chipped dogs turned up in AP's
four-month examination of research on chips and health. In one dog, the
researchers said cancer appeared linked to the presence of the embedded
chip; in the other, the cancer's cause was uncertain.)"

From: http://tinyurl.com/2k2b47 - washingtonpost.com

Also: http://tinyurl.com/5kvcmc knoxnews.com, article from vet

My cat has been chipped for nearly 10 years, and because I've been
posted overseas multiple times, I know quite a lot of people who have
chipped pets (it is a requirement of entry for many countries). I know
not one person - NOT ONE - who's pet has gotten cancer from their chip.
And nearly everyone I know has a chipped pet!

Now, it is quite possible that the specific Verichip microchip has a
problem, for whatever reason. Even if that is true, that doesn't mean
Avid or HomeAgain chips have the same defect.

Nobody's going to break into my home if she gets lost, because I'll only
provide a phone number (cell phone!) on any "lost pet" poster, and if
her chip is read at a vet or shelter, it contains only her ID number -
they have to look my info up in the database(s). She has a collar. It
has only her name and chip number on it, so they'd have to take Meep to
a shelter or vet to get it read, and then the shelter or vet would call
me directly - they would not provide that information to the person who
found her.


If you want to believe something, you will *always* find information on
the 'net confirming your belief. It is much harder to keep an open mind
and look at BOTH SIDES and then decide what you will believe.

After reading information telling both sides of the story:

Meep keeps her chip.

jmc

jmc
August 13th 08, 10:08 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Manfred Mann exclaimed (8/13/2008 2:48 AM):
> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
> > wrote:
>> Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that and I
>> watch the news all the time
>> Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more than
>> your phone number on the lost ad
>> And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>> pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>>
> Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
> they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.
>
> I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.
>

What, do you live near a live testing lab or something? I'm beginning
to smell a troll here.

I live in a relatively high crime area (DC suburbs). There are plenty
of cats and the occasional dog wandering around our neighborhood - many
with collars so I know they're not feral - and nobody's stealing them.

jmc

AMUN[_4_]
August 13th 08, 10:50 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Manfred Mann exclaimed (8/13/2008 2:48 AM):
>> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
>> > wrote:
>>> Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that and
>>> I watch the news all the time
>>> Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more
>>> than your phone number on the lost ad
>>> And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>>> pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>>>
>> Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
>> they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.
>>
>> I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.
>>
>
> What, do you live near a live testing lab or something? I'm beginning to
> smell a troll here.
>
> I live in a relatively high crime area (DC suburbs). There are plenty of
> cats and the occasional dog wandering around our neighborhood - many with
> collars so I know they're not feral - and nobody's stealing them.
>
> jmc


Ahhh, but maybe they are being stolen from other neighborhoods and being
hidden in yours.
Cat thieves are smart that way.

Cheryl[_4_]
August 13th 08, 11:22 PM
"Rene S." > wrote in message
...
>
>
> BTW, it's worth checking into what brand of chip companies before you
> have it done. I chose Avis, as it's become one of the most common
> brands. With Avis, there's a one-time fee to register your pet. With
> other companies, like Home Again, you'll an annual fee. Just something
> to consider.
>
> Rene
>

I chose AVID, too, for the same reason. Plus they have a multiple pet policy
where you pay something like $40 for up to 10 pets. Don't quote me on that
cost because I can't remember what it was.
http://www.avidmicrochip.com/

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
August 13th 08, 11:48 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 11:47 PM):
>> "outsider" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in
>>> :
>>>
>>>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/12/2008 4:09
>>>>> PM):
>>>>>> "AKT" > wrote in message
>>>>> .
>>> .
>>> .
>>> ......Biased nonsense deleted
>>> .
>>>> ================================================== ===================
>>>
>>>
>>> Doesn't your aluminum skull-cap protect you againt the chip's bad
>>> effects?
>>
>> Right. Faked test results of a cancer study. Positively crazy to assume
>> they had anything to hide. I'm sure there is a perfectly reasonable
>> explanation.
>>
>> Paul
>
> Well, I haven't followed up on the provided links (thank you) but I'm
> still doubting the veracity. Aside from the fact that VeriChip is only
> *one* microchip company, and not even the biggest. Or second biggest.
>
> I did a bit of my own research, both pro and con. You've already provided
> plenty of con. I found this - the quote in the first paragraph is
> especially important, I think:
>
> "Dr. Cheryl London, a veterinarian oncologist at Ohio State University,
> noted: "It's much easier to cause cancer in mice than it is in people. So
> it may be that what you're seeing in mice represents an exaggerated
> phenomenon of what may occur in people."
>
> Tens of thousands of dogs have been chipped, she said, and veterinary
> pathologists haven't reported outbreaks of related sarcomas in the area of
> the neck, where canine implants are often done. (Published reports
> detailing malignant tumors in two chipped dogs turned up in AP's
> four-month examination of research on chips and health. In one dog, the
> researchers said cancer appeared linked to the presence of the embedded
> chip; in the other, the cancer's cause was uncertain.)"
>
> From: http://tinyurl.com/2k2b47 - washingtonpost.com
>
> Also: http://tinyurl.com/5kvcmc knoxnews.com, article from vet
>
> My cat has been chipped for nearly 10 years, and because I've been posted
> overseas multiple times, I know quite a lot of people who have chipped
> pets (it is a requirement of entry for many countries). I know not one
> person - NOT ONE - who's pet has gotten cancer from their chip. And nearly
> everyone I know has a chipped pet!
>
> Now, it is quite possible that the specific Verichip microchip has a
> problem, for whatever reason. Even if that is true, that doesn't mean
> Avid or HomeAgain chips have the same defect.
>
> Nobody's going to break into my home if she gets lost, because I'll only
> provide a phone number (cell phone!) on any "lost pet" poster, and if her
> chip is read at a vet or shelter, it contains only her ID number - they
> have to look my info up in the database(s). She has a collar. It has
> only her name and chip number on it, so they'd have to take Meep to a
> shelter or vet to get it read, and then the shelter or vet would call me
> directly - they would not provide that information to the person who found
> her.
>
>
> If you want to believe something, you will *always* find information on
> the 'net confirming your belief. It is much harder to keep an open mind
> and look at BOTH SIDES and then decide what you will believe.


I presented that only for your information. What you decide to do with it
is your decision. I am very glad I opted for the removal. My mother had my
cat chipped when he was under her care as a youngster before I took him in.
She did it with the very best of intentions and I am sure you did as well.
But as any doctor or vet will tell you, a source of constant irritation has
the potential to become a cancerous tumor at some point. It is unavoidable
fact. Cancer is not a probability but a possibility and it is a risk I
weighed as one I did not wish to take. Chipping cats is relatively new and
there simply is not sufficient statitsical evidence to make any claims of
safety. So I chose the path of prevention. The same risk is involved in
vaccinations resulting in some site induced fibrocarcinomas. One of my
sister's cats had a leg amputated due to just such an event. But in that
case, the risk of disease outweighs the risk of potential cancer in my mind.

I think everyone should be educated oin the subject and that was my
intention.

Paul

No Name
August 14th 08, 12:23 AM
Per Maia Rutledge:
>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>cats they would be stolen.

We've been waiting, hoping for three years now.... but no
luck.... no vacations.... and significant lost blood.

Could you arrange for somebody to come around to our
neighborhood? -)
--
Kolon Skorupski

jmc
August 14th 08, 01:11 AM
Suddenly, without warning, AMUN exclaimed (8/13/2008 5:50 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Manfred Mann exclaimed (8/13/2008 2:48 AM):
>>> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
>>> > wrote:
>>>> Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that and
>>>> I watch the news all the time
>>>> Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more
>>>> than your phone number on the lost ad
>>>> And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>>>> pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>>>>
>>> Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
>>> they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.
>>>
>>> I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.
>>>
>> What, do you live near a live testing lab or something? I'm beginning to
>> smell a troll here.
>>
>> I live in a relatively high crime area (DC suburbs). There are plenty of
>> cats and the occasional dog wandering around our neighborhood - many with
>> collars so I know they're not feral - and nobody's stealing them.
>>
>> jmc
>
>
> Ahhh, but maybe they are being stolen from other neighborhoods and being
> hidden in yours.
> Cat thieves are smart that way.
>
>

lol. I know! Maybe the thieves stealing Manfred's neighbors cats
actually lives hereabouts!

Geeze. I wish they'd steal our squirrels, instead.

jmc

jmc
August 14th 08, 01:14 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Cheryl exclaimed (8/13/2008 6:22 PM):
> "Rene S." > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>>
>> BTW, it's worth checking into what brand of chip companies before you
>> have it done. I chose Avis, as it's become one of the most common
>> brands. With Avis, there's a one-time fee to register your pet. With
>> other companies, like Home Again, you'll an annual fee. Just something
>> to consider.
>>
>> Rene
>>
>
> I chose AVID, too, for the same reason. Plus they have a multiple pet
> policy where you pay something like $40 for up to 10 pets. Don't quote
> me on that cost because I can't remember what it was.
> http://www.avidmicrochip.com/
>

I don't think HomeAgain has an annual fee. I just updated Meep's info
(originally input in 2002) and it didn't cost me a dime. I paid back in
2002, and nothing since. I'm not sure, but I don't think any of them
care about the brand of chip. Meep has an Avid, and neither AKCCAR or
HomeAgain twitched when I originally entered her info.

jmc

jmc

jmc
August 14th 08, 01:19 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/13/2008 6:48 PM):
>
> Chipping cats is relatively new and
> there simply is not sufficient statitsical evidence to make any claims of
> safety. So I chose the path of prevention. The same risk is involved in
> vaccinations resulting in some site induced fibrocarcinomas. One of my
> sister's cats had a leg amputated due to just such an event. But in that
> case, the risk of disease outweighs the risk of potential cancer in my mind.
>
> I think everyone should be educated oin the subject and that was my
> intention.
>
> Paul
>
>

No problem with the education but "relatively new"? Pets have been
being chipped for over 10 years now. Probably millions of pets worldwide
have been chipped. That's hardly new.

The vaccination carcinomas are another thing altogether. And all my
vets, worldwide, have responded by changing around the vaccination
sites, and minimizing the number of vaccinations Meep gets. She got
none this year, my vet telling me that they only do the 3way every three
years now, instead of yearly, and won't vaccinate for leukemia unless
she's an outdoor cat (which she is not).

jmc

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
August 14th 08, 01:36 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Paul M. Cook exclaimed (8/13/2008 6:48 PM):
>>
>> Chipping cats is relatively new and there simply is not sufficient
>> statitsical evidence to make any claims of safety. So I chose the path
>> of prevention. The same risk is involved in vaccinations resulting in
>> some site induced fibrocarcinomas. One of my sister's cats had a leg
>> amputated due to just such an event. But in that case, the risk of
>> disease outweighs the risk of potential cancer in my mind.
>>
>> I think everyone should be educated oin the subject and that was my
>> intention.
>>
>> Paul
>
> No problem with the education but "relatively new"? Pets have been being
> chipped for over 10 years now. Probably millions of pets worldwide have
> been chipped. That's hardly new.

It is very new when you consider that it would require several generations
of chipped cats studied to make any valuable statistical claim. 10 years is
nothing, and since I follow pet news I know it has been pushed for felines
for much less of those 10 years. I distinctly recall asking a vet about it
and his response was it was something suggests for dogs only as cats just
didn't need them as they rarely got lost. When I was a kid growing up with
dogs it seemed like no matter how hard we tried to secure the yard, the dogs
occasionally got out. I recall several trips to the pound to retrieve them.
Chipping a dog is something I might just consider for one because they have
different physiologies than cats and they don't tend to live as long making
cancer less of a risk..

>
> The vaccination carcinomas are another thing altogether. And all my vets,
> worldwide, have responded by changing around the vaccination sites, and
> minimizing the number of vaccinations Meep gets. She got none this year,
> my vet telling me that they only do the 3way every three years now,
> instead of yearly, and won't vaccinate for leukemia unless she's an
> outdoor cat (which she is not).

Indeed, yes. and 10 years ago that was completely *not* the prevailing
wisdom. Up until recently vets were routinely super-dosing cats with as
many as 6 vaccines at one time. Now they don't tend to do that. My vet is
very up to date and when I brought little Noel in for her shots, she agreed
we would spread them out over a couple of months. See how things change in
10 years? Some vets are even advising against some vaccines that are still
consider routine - rabies comes to mind. So no, 10 years is a blip. 10
years ago we were all told the secret to being cancer free was to eat oat
bran. Now they say it is useless.

As for Verichip - you have to wonder about a company whose solution to
flagging sales is to get a law passed requiring human children to be
chipped.

Paul

Cheryl[_4_]
August 14th 08, 02:25 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Cheryl exclaimed (8/13/2008 6:22 PM):
>> "Rene S." > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>>
>>> BTW, it's worth checking into what brand of chip companies before you
>>> have it done. I chose Avis, as it's become one of the most common
>>> brands. With Avis, there's a one-time fee to register your pet. With
>>> other companies, like Home Again, you'll an annual fee. Just something
>>> to consider.
>>>
>>> Rene
>>>
>>
>> I chose AVID, too, for the same reason. Plus they have a multiple pet
>> policy where you pay something like $40 for up to 10 pets. Don't quote
>> me on that cost because I can't remember what it was.
>> http://www.avidmicrochip.com/
>>
>
> I don't think HomeAgain has an annual fee. I just updated Meep's info
> (originally input in 2002) and it didn't cost me a dime. I paid back in
> 2002, and nothing since. I'm not sure, but I don't think any of them care
> about the brand of chip. Meep has an Avid, and neither AKCCAR or
> HomeAgain twitched when I originally entered her info.
>
The $40 or whatever I paid was a one time fee. This is just to say that
just implanting the chip isn't the only cost involved. I was a little
surprised to find out I had to pay more on top of the cost of implanting it.
I can't remember that cost either, but I think it was something like $35 per
cat.

Janet
August 14th 08, 03:50 AM
"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 20:09:41 -0400, "Janet" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
...
>>> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 18:08:10 -0400, "Janet" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Manfred Mann" > wrote in message
>>>>
>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>>> you're searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>
>>>>Um, why would a missing cat trigger a home invasion? Very strange way
>>>>to
>>>>select a target on the part of the burglars.
>>>>
>>> Here is a hint: the perp gets your personal information: knows that
>>> your house will be empty since you'll be looking for the lost
>>> pet YOU JUST REPORTED TO THEM.
>>>
>>> If he broke into the computer to get your personal inforamtion he
>>> also knows that you just reported the pet missing.
>>>
>>> So your house will be empty so the perp can take his time.
>>>
>>> I don't know where you live but here in this part of the US of A
>>> people watch for on line ads for lost pets and then prey on the
>>> vulnerable owners. I'm glad you live in an area that doesn't
>>> have those problems.
>>>
>>
>>Where I live, many people never lock their doors, and some people I know
>>go
>>on vacation and leave the doors unlocked.
>>
>
> I'm glad you live a crime free location, around here people have
> two, three, four locks etc. bars on the windows, alarms, etc.
> and they still come home to find their house/apartment broken into.
>

Maybe you should move.

dgk
August 14th 08, 01:40 PM
On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:

>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>
>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>> compromised?
>>>>
>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>
>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while you're
>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>
>>>
>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You can't be
>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable as a
>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the content
>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>>> chip?
>>>
>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>
>>>
>>> Jack
>>
>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft - I
>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>
>>Hugs,
>>
>>CatNipped
>>
>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>cats they would be stolen.

Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
would make any money?

Maia Rutledge
August 14th 08, 02:51 PM
On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:

>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>
>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>
>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>
>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while you're
>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You can't be
>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable as a
>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the content
>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>>>> chip?
>>>>
>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Jack
>>>
>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft - I
>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>
>>>Hugs,
>>>
>>>CatNipped
>>>
>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>cats they would be stolen.
>
>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>would make any money?

Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
Especially if it is a rare breed.

Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.

Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
read the police logs in the paper.

Matthew[_3_]
August 14th 08, 05:47 PM
"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>
>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>>>> you're
>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>> can't be
>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable
>>>>> as a
>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>> content
>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>>>>> chip?
>>>>>
>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Jack
>>>>
>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft -
>>>>I
>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>
>>>>Hugs,
>>>>
>>>>CatNipped
>>>>
>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>
>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>would make any money?
>
> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>
> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>
> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
> read the police logs in the paper.
>
May be get on some meds

AMUN[_4_]
August 14th 08, 06:55 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, AMUN exclaimed (8/13/2008 5:50 PM):
>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Suddenly, without warning, Manfred Mann exclaimed (8/13/2008 2:48 AM):
>>>> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>> Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that
>>>>> and I watch the news all the time
>>>>> Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more
>>>>> than your phone number on the lost ad
>>>>> And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>>>>> pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>>>>>
>>>> Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
>>>> they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.
>>>>
>>>> I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.
>>>>
>>> What, do you live near a live testing lab or something? I'm beginning
>>> to smell a troll here.
>>>
>>> I live in a relatively high crime area (DC suburbs). There are plenty
>>> of cats and the occasional dog wandering around our neighborhood - many
>>> with collars so I know they're not feral - and nobody's stealing them.
>>>
>>> jmc
>>
>>
>> Ahhh, but maybe they are being stolen from other neighborhoods and being
>> hidden in yours.
>> Cat thieves are smart that way.
>
> lol. I know! Maybe the thieves stealing Manfred's neighbors cats
> actually lives hereabouts!
>
> Geeze. I wish they'd steal our squirrels, instead.
>


Oh sure.
Then you would be posting in alt.pet.squirrels, about how terrible it is in
your neighborhood

jmc
August 15th 08, 10:38 PM
Suddenly, without warning, AMUN exclaimed (8/14/2008 1:55 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, AMUN exclaimed (8/13/2008 5:50 PM):
>>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Suddenly, without warning, Manfred Mann exclaimed (8/13/2008 2:48 AM):
>>>>> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:39:49 -0400, "Matthew"
>>>>> > wrote:
>>>>>> Well I am in the USA and this is the first I have heard of that
>>>>>> and I watch the news all the time
>>>>>> Second every site that deal with pets always tell you never put more
>>>>>> than your phone number on the lost ad
>>>>>> And the thieves are not stealing regular animals they are stealing
>>>>>> pedigrees and that has been going on for decades
>>>>>>
>>>>> Wake up and smell the coffee.....here in this corner of the US of A
>>>>> they are stealing EVERY DOG OR CAT THAT IS OUTSIDE.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm glad you live in a place with no crime.
>>>>>
>>>> What, do you live near a live testing lab or something? I'm beginning
>>>> to smell a troll here.
>>>>
>>>> I live in a relatively high crime area (DC suburbs). There are plenty
>>>> of cats and the occasional dog wandering around our neighborhood - many
>>>> with collars so I know they're not feral - and nobody's stealing them.
>>>>
>>>> jmc
>>>
>>> Ahhh, but maybe they are being stolen from other neighborhoods and being
>>> hidden in yours.
>>> Cat thieves are smart that way.
>> lol. I know! Maybe the thieves stealing Manfred's neighbors cats
>> actually lives hereabouts!
>>
>> Geeze. I wish they'd steal our squirrels, instead.
>>
>
>
> Oh sure.
> Then you would be posting in alt.pet.squirrels, about how terrible it is in
> your neighborhood
>
>

Not meee! I'd be askin' if I could help!

:)

jmc

AMUN[_4_]
August 15th 08, 10:47 PM
"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>
>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>>>> you're
>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>> can't be
>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable
>>>>> as a
>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>> content
>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>>>>> chip?
>>>>>
>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Jack
>>>>
>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft -
>>>>I
>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>
>>>>Hugs,
>>>>
>>>>CatNipped
>>>>
>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>
>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>would make any money?
>
> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>
> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>
> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
> read the police logs in the paper.
>


Gee whiz, if I were you I wouldn't be so paranoid about your cats and be
more concerned about the net hackers going through all the info on your
computer and seeing all those <wink wink, nudge nudge>"private" videos and
pictures while you are reading this.
Whoops did I just type that ?

Maia Rutledge
August 16th 08, 02:13 AM
On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 17:47:10 -0400, "AMUN" >
wrote:

>
>"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
>> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>>>>> you're
>>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>>> can't be
>>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there about
>>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable
>>>>>> as a
>>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>>> content
>>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on the
>>>>>> chip?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Jack
>>>>>
>>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a theft -
>>>>>I
>>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>>
>>>>>Hugs,
>>>>>
>>>>>CatNipped
>>>>>
>>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>>
>>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>>would make any money?
>>
>> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
>> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>>
>> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>>
>> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
>> read the police logs in the paper.
>>
>
>
>Gee whiz, if I were you I wouldn't be so paranoid about your cats and be
>more concerned about the net hackers going through all the info on your
>computer and seeing all those <wink wink, nudge nudge>"private" videos and
>pictures while you are reading this.
>Whoops did I just type that ?
>
That is what firewalls are for.

AMUN[_4_]
August 16th 08, 01:51 PM
"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 17:47:10 -0400, "AMUN" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
>>> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>>>>>> you're
>>>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>>>> can't be
>>>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there
>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more desirable
>>>>>>> as a
>>>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>>>> content
>>>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> chip?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Jack
>>>>>>
>>>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a
>>>>>>theft -
>>>>>>I
>>>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Hugs,
>>>>>>
>>>>>>CatNipped
>>>>>>
>>>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>>>
>>>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>>>would make any money?
>>>
>>> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
>>> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>>>
>>> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>>>
>>> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
>>> read the police logs in the paper.
>>>
>>
>>
>>Gee whiz, if I were you I wouldn't be so paranoid about your cats and be
>>more concerned about the net hackers going through all the info on your
>>computer and seeing all those <wink wink, nudge nudge>"private" videos and
>>pictures while you are reading this.
>>Whoops did I just type that ?
>>
> That is what firewalls are for.


Yup,...that's what "THEY" want you to think.
Just like the fallacy that owners info can be downloaded from ID chips.

More danger of your abducted kitty being tortured by the kidnappers (bamboo
under the claws is a favorite) and forced to tell everything about the
owner.
You never wonder WHY, cats sit beside you when you type at the keyboard or
get their front paws on a desk looking at what's there.

They're Me(ow)morizing all your private info.

Matthew[_3_]
August 16th 08, 03:02 PM
"AMUN" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 17:47:10 -0400, "AMUN" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
>>>> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone number
>>>>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone finds
>>>>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and while
>>>>>>>>> you're
>>>>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>>>>> can't be
>>>>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there
>>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more
>>>>>>>> desirable
>>>>>>>> as a
>>>>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>>>>> content
>>>>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>> chip?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Jack
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a
>>>>>>>theft -
>>>>>>>I
>>>>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Hugs,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>CatNipped
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>>>>
>>>>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>>>>would make any money?
>>>>
>>>> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
>>>> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>>>>
>>>> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>>>>
>>>> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
>>>> read the police logs in the paper.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Gee whiz, if I were you I wouldn't be so paranoid about your cats and be
>>>more concerned about the net hackers going through all the info on your
>>>computer and seeing all those <wink wink, nudge nudge>"private" videos
>>>and
>>>pictures while you are reading this.
>>>Whoops did I just type that ?
>>>
>> That is what firewalls are for.
>
>
> Yup,...that's what "THEY" want you to think.
> Just like the fallacy that owners info can be downloaded from ID chips.
>
> More danger of your abducted kitty being tortured by the kidnappers
> (bamboo under the claws is a favorite) and forced to tell everything about
> the owner.
> You never wonder WHY, cats sit beside you when you type at the keyboard or
> get their front paws on a desk looking at what's there.
>
> They're Me(ow)morizing all your private info.
>


Hey AMUN don't tell him but I got all his info from his cats they told me
he wears a pink tu tu and spanks his monkey to the song the final countdown
;-)

AMUN[_4_]
August 16th 08, 06:47 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
ng.com...
>
> "AMUN" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 17:47:10 -0400, "AMUN" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
>>>>> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone
>>>>>>>>>> number
>>>>>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone
>>>>>>>>>> finds
>>>>>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and
>>>>>>>>>> while
>>>>>>>>>> you're
>>>>>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>>>>>> can't be
>>>>>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there
>>>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more
>>>>>>>>> desirable
>>>>>>>>> as a
>>>>>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>>>>>> content
>>>>>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on
>>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>>> chip?
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Jack
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a
>>>>>>>>theft -
>>>>>>>>I
>>>>>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Hugs,
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>CatNipped
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>>>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>>>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>>>>>would make any money?
>>>>>
>>>>> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
>>>>> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>>>>>
>>>>> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>>>>>
>>>>> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
>>>>> read the police logs in the paper.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Gee whiz, if I were you I wouldn't be so paranoid about your cats and be
>>>>more concerned about the net hackers going through all the info on your
>>>>computer and seeing all those <wink wink, nudge nudge>"private" videos
>>>>and
>>>>pictures while you are reading this.
>>>>Whoops did I just type that ?
>>>>
>>> That is what firewalls are for.
>>
>>
>> Yup,...that's what "THEY" want you to think.
>> Just like the fallacy that owners info can be downloaded from ID chips.
>>
>> More danger of your abducted kitty being tortured by the kidnappers
>> (bamboo under the claws is a favorite) and forced to tell everything
>> about the owner.
>> You never wonder WHY, cats sit beside you when you type at the keyboard
>> or get their front paws on a desk looking at what's there.
>>
>> They're Me(ow)morizing all your private info.
>>
>
>
> Hey AMUN don't tell him but I got all his info from his cats they told
> me he wears a pink tu tu and spanks his monkey to the song the final
> countdown ;-)
>


I wouldn't take that info as gospel, and you could be spreading mistruths.
.....The cat COULD be colorblind.

Kathy[_2_]
August 17th 08, 03:23 AM
In regard to the stolen cat person - dogs are more likely to be stolen. A
cat is not usually as valuable - not that some aren't. But people with
potentially valuable cats do not leave them in a place where they would be
liable to be taken or wander. Dogs, on the other hand are left to sleep in
the backs of trucks before dog shows and are stolen. I've seen that in the
news lately. Cat people would have the good sense to sneak then into a
motel...JMHO, naturally.
Kathy and Woodgie >^..^<(who is emotionally valuable, but not dollar wise)

Matthew[_3_]
August 17th 08, 08:01 AM
"AMUN" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> ng.com...
>>
>> "AMUN" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 17:47:10 -0400, "AMUN" >
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>"Maia Rutledge" > wrote in message
...
>>>>>> On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 08:40:44 -0400, dgk > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 10:50:13 -0400, Maia Rutledge
> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:01:40 -0500, "CatNipped"
> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>"J a c k" > wrote in message
. ..
>>>>>>>>>> Manfred Mann wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> Which raises the question: have any of these databases been
>>>>>>>>>>> compromised?
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> (Think TJX and other massive breaches.)
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> (Speaking of breaches, any chips that only disclose a phone
>>>>>>>>>>> number
>>>>>>>>>>> and code but give out no personal information? i.e. someone
>>>>>>>>>>> finds
>>>>>>>>>>> your missing pet, gets your information (name, address), and
>>>>>>>>>>> while
>>>>>>>>>>> you're
>>>>>>>>>>> searcheing for your pet, the person purporting to have found
>>>>>>>>>>> your pet breaks into your home.)
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> What? Your home isn't visible? You are not in the phone book? You
>>>>>>>>>> can't be
>>>>>>>>>> followed to your home many times in a given week? What is there
>>>>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>>>>> having a cat that makes you either more vulnerable or more
>>>>>>>>>> desirable
>>>>>>>>>> as a
>>>>>>>>>> target? Is your VISA card number listed in the chip data? Is the
>>>>>>>>>> content
>>>>>>>>>> of your safe, your refrigerator, or your DVD collection listed on
>>>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>>>> chip?
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> What exactly would be the threat?
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Jack
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>With five cats I think I'd be less desirable as the victim of a
>>>>>>>>>theft -
>>>>>>>>>I
>>>>>>>>>spend all my money on cat food and vet visits! ;>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Hugs,
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>CatNipped
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Well in this part of the US of A with the economy the way it is
>>>>>>>>there is a very good chance that if your cats are outdoor
>>>>>>>>cats they would be stolen.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Just out of curiosity, what would someone do with a stolen cat that
>>>>>>>would make any money?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sell it. Did you really not grasp that?
>>>>>> Especially if it is a rare breed.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Oh and they can hold it for ransom too.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Maybe you should pull your head out of the sand and
>>>>>> read the police logs in the paper.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Gee whiz, if I were you I wouldn't be so paranoid about your cats and
>>>>>be
>>>>>more concerned about the net hackers going through all the info on your
>>>>>computer and seeing all those <wink wink, nudge nudge>"private" videos
>>>>>and
>>>>>pictures while you are reading this.
>>>>>Whoops did I just type that ?
>>>>>
>>>> That is what firewalls are for.
>>>
>>>
>>> Yup,...that's what "THEY" want you to think.
>>> Just like the fallacy that owners info can be downloaded from ID chips.
>>>
>>> More danger of your abducted kitty being tortured by the kidnappers
>>> (bamboo under the claws is a favorite) and forced to tell everything
>>> about the owner.
>>> You never wonder WHY, cats sit beside you when you type at the keyboard
>>> or get their front paws on a desk looking at what's there.
>>>
>>> They're Me(ow)morizing all your private info.
>>>
>>
>>
>> Hey AMUN don't tell him but I got all his info from his cats they told
>> me he wears a pink tu tu and spanks his monkey to the song the final
>> countdown ;-)
>>
>
>
> I wouldn't take that info as gospel, and you could be spreading mistruths.
> ....The cat COULD be colorblind.
>


ROFLMAO

AKT
August 28th 08, 05:44 AM
Thanks for all the info in the thread. I am thinking about a chip. We
live pretty close to a Banfield/Petsmart, so I inquired there. They
told me their cost is $30 for lifetime upkeep of data . Also, they use
*two* chips which conform to different frequency standards [darn, what
is it about our way of doing things that we create this mess
everywhere? :) ].

Seems fine, does it not?