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cshenk
August 15th 08, 07:20 PM
Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and would
never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just unaware of how to
train a cat to not damage things or skin. So, how about a few tips and
tricks you all use?

I might learn a few new ones too!

Most of my cat training is practically instinct now so it's hard to really
recall what I do. Just that most start out using them and within a short
while, drift to acceptable behavior uses.

Lets see. If they scratch one of us, we stop playing right away. Pretty
fast they learn if they want to play, they cant scratch. If they scratch
bad enough to draw blood, they get a *very mild* manicure right away. Just
a tiny bit of the tips and not every finger, just enough to get the point
across and faintly dull them. Daisy got the hint the first time after
playing too rough once with me. Daisy however is a very smart cat. Most
take (umm, thinking) a month or so to really absorb that one? It's also why
I trim only a tiny bit and not all the toes, so can do it again if the cat
is a little stubborn. (Never trim too far!)

If a cat starts shredding something inapproriate, distract them but dont
actually play with them or feed them to distract them. That teaches them
that 'good things happen when I do this'. I just get up and make some sort
of loudish noises like singing off key but not directed 'at' the cat, just
near it. Do have lots of stuff around that they are allowed to poke at and
give them lots of approval for using them. There's a particular scatter rug
Daisy likes for example and we smile and give her a little treat now and
again when she's using it to idle-y half sleep and kneed with her claws.

CatNipped[_2_]
August 15th 08, 08:50 PM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and would
> never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just unaware of how to
> train a cat to not damage things or skin. So, how about a few tips and
> tricks you all use?
>
> I might learn a few new ones too!
>
> Most of my cat training is practically instinct now so it's hard to really
> recall what I do. Just that most start out using them and within a short
> while, drift to acceptable behavior uses.
>
> Lets see. If they scratch one of us, we stop playing right away. Pretty
> fast they learn if they want to play, they cant scratch. If they scratch
> bad enough to draw blood, they get a *very mild* manicure right away.
> Just a tiny bit of the tips and not every finger, just enough to get the
> point across and faintly dull them. Daisy got the hint the first time
> after playing too rough once with me. Daisy however is a very smart cat.
> Most take (umm, thinking) a month or so to really absorb that one? It's
> also why I trim only a tiny bit and not all the toes, so can do it again
> if the cat is a little stubborn. (Never trim too far!)
>
> If a cat starts shredding something inapproriate, distract them but dont
> actually play with them or feed them to distract them. That teaches them
> that 'good things happen when I do this'. I just get up and make some
> sort of loudish noises like singing off key but not directed 'at' the cat,
> just near it. Do have lots of stuff around that they are allowed to poke
> at and give them lots of approval for using them. There's a particular
> scatter rug Daisy likes for example and we smile and give her a little
> treat now and again when she's using it to idle-y half sleep and kneed
> with her claws.

I start clipping their claws when they're kittens and give them treats
afterwards - they actually look forward to their mani/pedi every two weeks.
With claws trimmed there are never any accidents (like when they're sliding
off your lap and instinctive grab on with their claws). It makes play among
them safer too. When I adopt an adult cat I gently manipulate their paws as
I pet them, then start pushing their claws out, then start clipping when
they're comfortable with having their paws handled (and, again, give them
lots of treats).

Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching posts in
each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and horizontal, all
very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and praise them when they
use one.

Hugs,

CatNipped

cshenk
August 15th 08, 10:20 PM
"CatNipped" wrote

>> Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and would
>> never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just unaware of how to
>> train a cat to not damage things or skin. So, how about a few tips and
>> tricks you all use?

> I start clipping their claws when they're kittens and give them treats
> afterwards - they actually look forward to their mani/pedi every two
> weeks.

Humm! A totally different approach and workable it seems!

> With claws trimmed there are never any accidents (like when they're
> sliding off your lap and instinctive grab on with their claws). It makes
> play among them safer too. When I adopt an adult cat I gently manipulate
> their paws as I pet them, then start pushing their claws out, then start
> clipping when they're comfortable with having their paws handled (and,
> again, give them lots of treats).

Heheh I like that. I do play with their paws gently and most of them like
it (only the 2 horribly declawed ones didnt and even one of them took to
loving his little 'foot massage' once we both learned gently what felt good
to him)

> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching posts in
> each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and horizontal, all
> very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and praise them when they
> use one.

I have always gotten good carpets so they are able to be used for this.
Berber loop types mostly. That means most of the floors are 'scratching
post acceptable'. I have one bit of furniture that I worry a little about (a
silk covered sofa) but if it gets damaged, 'oh well'. I can have it
recovered. Daisy seems smarter than most cats and doesnt bother that one.
In fact, Daisy trained faster than any other cat I have ever had for all
that she acts a bit feral in other ways.... (In her heart, seems a lap kitty
who's been abused and will not allow herself to be picked up but will
happily roll over for a tummy rub if you are sitting on the floor by her).

One of my doors has a nice sisal box (surrounded by nice molding, we made
this years ago) down low. I replaced the sisal just 2 months ago, putting
catnip leaves behind it then the framing wood back up. Call it a built in
catscratch pad. Takes about 10 mins to do that once the wood is cut. (the
wood takes about 30 mins or so to make a neat frame when you first make it).
It's about 4 inches up from the door bottom and 21"x 28".

Not mentioned here as OT, but Don and I are pretty handy DIY sorts.

Now, On topic is a project we did yesterday. Daisy loves the screened porch
at night but the ledges were a wee bit thin for her. She's a little
overweight but dropping nicely at a decent safe pace. (Frame of cat would
be a 7-8 lb and she was 12 whe we got her, now about 10).

We made a little 'step ladder' so she can just walk up there to to the ledge
then at her favorite spot, added an extension covered with some carpet
remnants. The ledge without the extension is about 6 inches deep, roughly 3
ft up, and 44 feet long. Some sections have the posts that hold up the
roof, but they are still leaving a good 3 inches of rail around them which
she manages with ease. Her 'ladder' is about 8ft from her new perch. A
second one (perch and ladder) are in the plans for along the 4ft or so
section by the screen door that she cant reach from the other section and
due to rain pattern there, will be a faster drying sisal on the wood frame
top. I have some spools of fairly thick sisal rope to use for the post that
holds the current and planned perches. I am looking over my old
marlinspikemanship (roap fancy stuff) to design the pattern for that.

Janet
August 16th 08, 03:11 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message

> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching posts in
> each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and horizontal, all
> very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and praise them when they
> use one.
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

My adopoted cat has no interest in catnip OR in the scratching things I've
gotten for her. She does like to inflict damage on good furniture, if I get
behind on nail-clipping.

Xas
August 17th 08, 06:03 AM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and would
> never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just unaware of how to
> train a cat to not damage things or skin. So, how about a few tips and
> tricks you all use?
>
> I might learn a few new ones too!
>
> Most of my cat training is practically instinct now so it's hard to really
> recall what I do. Just that most start out using them and within a short
> while, drift to acceptable behavior uses.
>
> Lets see. If they scratch one of us, we stop playing right away. Pretty
> fast they learn if they want to play, they cant scratch. If they scratch
> bad enough to draw blood, they get a *very mild* manicure right away.
> Just a tiny bit of the tips and not every finger, just enough to get the
> point across and faintly dull them. Daisy got the hint the first time
> after playing too rough once with me. Daisy however is a very smart cat.
> Most take (umm, thinking) a month or so to really absorb that one? It's
> also why I trim only a tiny bit and not all the toes, so can do it again
> if the cat is a little stubborn. (Never trim too far!)
>
> If a cat starts shredding something inapproriate, distract them but dont
> actually play with them or feed them to distract them. That teaches them
> that 'good things happen when I do this'. I just get up and make some
> sort of loudish noises like singing off key but not directed 'at' the cat,
> just near it. Do have lots of stuff around that they are allowed to poke
> at and give them lots of approval for using them. There's a particular
> scatter rug Daisy likes for example and we smile and give her a little
> treat now and again when she's using it to idle-y half sleep and kneed
> with her claws.
Train them the way their mother would - yowl at them when they stick the
claws in and make little cat spitting noises. If they persist, try a light
smack or flick on the paw, about the same force a mother cat would use for a
reprimand. Not enough to hurt, but enough to show you're not happy. But, it
has to be immediate. No doubt some people will wig out at this advice, but
remember, cats *do* smack each other when they are slightly annoyed. They
are not politically correct about smacking the kids. It's their early
warning signal. It means watch your step or there's worse to come. And
yes, you are the cat's mother now.
bp

CatNipped[_2_]
August 18th 08, 02:56 PM
"Janet" > wrote in message
...
>
> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>
>> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching posts
>> in each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and horizontal,
>> all very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and praise them when
>> they use one.
>>
>> Hugs,
>>
>> CatNipped
>
> My adopoted cat has no interest in catnip OR in the scratching things I've
> gotten for her. She does like to inflict damage on good furniture, if I
> get behind on nail-clipping.

Usually the problem, when they don't like scratching posts, is the type
you've provided (cats are as picky about those as they are about food).
There is the stand-up kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and wood, then
there's the horizontal kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and a kind of
cardboard that some cats like. Be sure any scratching post has a wide
enough base that it doesn't tip or sway when the cat puts his whole weight
on it. If it is unstable he won't use it. If catnip doesn't work you might
try some Valerian root - some cats prefer that even over catnip.

Hugs,

CatNipped

cybercat
August 18th 08, 08:59 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> "Janet" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>>
>>> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching posts
>>> in each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and
>>> horizontal, all very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and
>>> praise them when they use one.
>>>
>>> Hugs,
>>>
>>> CatNipped
>>
>> My adopoted cat has no interest in catnip OR in the scratching things
>> I've gotten for her. She does like to inflict damage on good furniture,
>> if I get behind on nail-clipping.
>
> Usually the problem, when they don't like scratching posts, is the type
> you've provided (cats are as picky about those as they are about food).
> There is the stand-up kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and wood, then
> there's the horizontal kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and a kind of
> cardboard that some cats like. Be sure any scratching post has a wide
> enough base that it doesn't tip or sway when the cat puts his whole weight
> on it. If it is unstable he won't use it. If catnip doesn't work you
> might try some Valerian root - some cats prefer that even over catnip.
>

Alpine Scratcher works every time.

jmc
August 18th 08, 11:07 PM
Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (8/18/2008 3:59 PM):
> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Janet" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>>>
>>>> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching posts
>>>> in each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and
>>>> horizontal, all very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and
>>>> praise them when they use one.
>>>>
>>>> Hugs,
>>>>
>>>> CatNipped
>>> My adopoted cat has no interest in catnip OR in the scratching things
>>> I've gotten for her. She does like to inflict damage on good furniture,
>>> if I get behind on nail-clipping.
>> Usually the problem, when they don't like scratching posts, is the type
>> you've provided (cats are as picky about those as they are about food).
>> There is the stand-up kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and wood, then
>> there's the horizontal kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and a kind of
>> cardboard that some cats like. Be sure any scratching post has a wide
>> enough base that it doesn't tip or sway when the cat puts his whole weight
>> on it. If it is unstable he won't use it. If catnip doesn't work you
>> might try some Valerian root - some cats prefer that even over catnip.
>>
>
> Alpine Scratcher works every time.
>

Not with Meep. Carpet or nuttin' for her. Won't touch Sissal. Even
tried, and failed to improve her opinion of it, once.

She has shown some interest in scratching the wood banister in our new
house though. First time ever she's scratched at something that does
not belong to just her. I think it's because she can stretch high to do
it. Guess I'll need to find a cat tree that has a very long wooden post.

jmc

jmc
August 18th 08, 11:13 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Xas exclaimed (8/17/2008 1:03 AM):
>
> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and
>> would never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just unaware
>> of how to train a cat to not damage things or skin. So, how about a
>> few tips and tricks you all use?
>>
>> I might learn a few new ones too!
>>
>> Most of my cat training is practically instinct now so it's hard to
>> really recall what I do. Just that most start out using them and
>> within a short while, drift to acceptable behavior uses.
>>
>> Lets see. If they scratch one of us, we stop playing right away.
>> Pretty fast they learn if they want to play, they cant scratch. If
>> they scratch bad enough to draw blood, they get a *very mild* manicure
>> right away. Just a tiny bit of the tips and not every finger, just
>> enough to get the point across and faintly dull them. Daisy got the
>> hint the first time after playing too rough once with me. Daisy
>> however is a very smart cat. Most take (umm, thinking) a month or so
>> to really absorb that one? It's also why I trim only a tiny bit and
>> not all the toes, so can do it again if the cat is a little stubborn.
>> (Never trim too far!)
>>
>> If a cat starts shredding something inapproriate, distract them but
>> dont actually play with them or feed them to distract them. That
>> teaches them that 'good things happen when I do this'. I just get up
>> and make some sort of loudish noises like singing off key but not
>> directed 'at' the cat, just near it. Do have lots of stuff around
>> that they are allowed to poke at and give them lots of approval for
>> using them. There's a particular scatter rug Daisy likes for example
>> and we smile and give her a little treat now and again when she's
>> using it to idle-y half sleep and kneed with her claws.
> Train them the way their mother would - yowl at them when they stick the
> claws in and make little cat spitting noises. If they persist, try a
> light smack or flick on the paw, about the same force a mother cat would
> use for a reprimand. Not enough to hurt, but enough to show you're not
> happy. But, it has to be immediate. No doubt some people will wig out
> at this advice, but remember, cats *do* smack each other when they are
> slightly annoyed. They are not politically correct about smacking the
> kids. It's their early warning signal. It means watch your step or
> there's worse to come. And yes, you are the cat's mother now.
> bp

Variety of methods with Meep. First, I bought the scratching post
before I even brought the kitten home.

Then, whenever she'd go to scratch on anything, I'd carry her over to
the post and set her front paws on it, praising her lavishly when she
scratched on it. Result: Aside from her recent interest in our wooden
banister, in 12 years and something like 5 moves (and lord knows how
many hotel rooms, she's truly Meep the TravelCat), she's never, ever
scratched on anything but her own stuff.

Scratching people, I used the "yowl, tap and ignore" method. If she
scratched me in play, I'd yowl, tap her gently on the paw or nose, then
completely ignore her. Same with biting.

She was very cute though. She learned quickly that biting was *not
allowed* but that licking was OK. When she was younger, she did not
like to be picked up. When I'd pick her up, she'd make this quick
"bite" movement with her head towards my arm, then lick it furiously.
It was soo cute. She now loves being picked up, so hasn't done that in
years.

More recently, I've been teaching her not to knead with her claws. If
she pricks me, I pick her up and clip her claws. In the beginning it
wasn't really training, just self-protection. But, she's learned to
avoid getting her claws clipped, by keeping them sheathed when she's on
my lap :)

jmc

cybercat
August 18th 08, 11:36 PM
"jmc" > wrote
>> Alpine Scratcher works every time.
>
> Not with Meep. Carpet or nuttin' for her. Won't touch Sissal. Even
> tried, and failed to improve her opinion of it, once.

Alpine Scratcher is not sisal. Have you tried it?
>
> She has shown some interest in scratching the wood banister in our new
> house though. First time ever she's scratched at something that does not
> belong to just her. I think it's because she can stretch high to do it.
> Guess I'll need to find a cat tree that has a very long wooden post.
>

yes, it seems that would be a good idea.

jmc
August 19th 08, 02:00 AM
Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (8/18/2008 6:36 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote
>>> Alpine Scratcher works every time.
>> Not with Meep. Carpet or nuttin' for her. Won't touch Sissal. Even
>> tried, and failed to improve her opinion of it, once.
>
> Alpine Scratcher is not sisal. Have you tried it?

If it's one of those cardboard things, yes. If it's not, what is it?
Probably have, tried lots over the years.

>> She has shown some interest in scratching the wood banister in our new
>> house though. First time ever she's scratched at something that does not
>> belong to just her. I think it's because she can stretch high to do it.
>> Guess I'll need to find a cat tree that has a very long wooden post.
>>
>
> yes, it seems that would be a good idea.
>
>
I'm sure the landlady would appreciate it :)

jmc

CatNipped[_2_]
August 19th 08, 02:49 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (8/18/2008 3:59 PM):
>> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Janet" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>>>>
>>>>> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching
>>>>> posts in each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and
>>>>> horizontal, all very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and
>>>>> praise them when they use one.
>>>>>
>>>>> Hugs,
>>>>>
>>>>> CatNipped
>>>> My adopoted cat has no interest in catnip OR in the scratching things
>>>> I've gotten for her. She does like to inflict damage on good furniture,
>>>> if I get behind on nail-clipping.
>>> Usually the problem, when they don't like scratching posts, is the type
>>> you've provided (cats are as picky about those as they are about food).
>>> There is the stand-up kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and wood,
>>> then there's the horizontal kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and a
>>> kind of cardboard that some cats like. Be sure any scratching post has
>>> a wide enough base that it doesn't tip or sway when the cat puts his
>>> whole weight on it. If it is unstable he won't use it. If catnip
>>> doesn't work you might try some Valerian root - some cats prefer that
>>> even over catnip.
>>>
>>
>> Alpine Scratcher works every time.
>
> Not with Meep. Carpet or nuttin' for her. Won't touch Sissal. Even
> tried, and failed to improve her opinion of it, once.
>
> She has shown some interest in scratching the wood banister in our new
> house though. First time ever she's scratched at something that does not
> belong to just her. I think it's because she can stretch high to do it.
> Guess I'll need to find a cat tree that has a very long wooden post.
>
> jmc

Mine *lurve* this one (from PetsMart):
http://www.possibleplaces.com/catnipped/Nipped/100_0735.jpg - it has one
sisal post, one carpeted post, and one wooden post. It's *very* stable - 20
pound Sammy can get a running start, jump onto the sisal post and climb up
into the little house on top, without it even wobbling.

Hugs,

CatNipped

cybercat
August 19th 08, 05:04 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote>
> Mine *lurve* this one (from PetsMart):
> http://www.possibleplaces.com/catnipped/Nipped/100_0735.jpg - it has one
> sisal post, one carpeted post, and one wooden post. It's *very* stable -
> 20 pound Sammy can get a running start, jump onto the sisal post and climb
> up into the little house on top, without it even wobbling.

It's pretty, too!

CatNipped[_2_]
August 19th 08, 05:30 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "CatNipped" > wrote>
>> Mine *lurve* this one (from PetsMart):
>> http://www.possibleplaces.com/catnipped/Nipped/100_0735.jpg - it has one
>> sisal post, one carpeted post, and one wooden post. It's *very* stable -
>> 20 pound Sammy can get a running start, jump onto the sisal post and
>> climb up into the little house on top, without it even wobbling.
>
> It's pretty, too!

Thanks! We usually don't buy stuff like this at PetsMart since they are
*so* overpriced. But I hadn't seen any other tree like this anywhere else,
so we shelled out the bucks for it then and there.

This is one we've been eying on eBay:
http://www.auctiva.com/hostedimages/showimage.aspx?gid=375968&image=90779375&images=90779375,90779378,90779382&formats=0,0,0&format=0

or

http://tinyurl.com/5eqp6a

And it costs less than the one we got at PetsMart (until you add in the
shipping cost). I just don't know how well it's made, but doesn't it look
*FUN*!!?

Hugs,

CatNipped

jmc
August 19th 08, 11:04 PM
Suddenly, without warning, CatNipped exclaimed (8/19/2008 9:49 AM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (8/18/2008 3:59 PM):
>>> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> "Janet" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> "CatNipped" > wrote in message
>>>>>
>>>>>> Other than that I just do the usual - have one or more scratching
>>>>>> posts in each room of the house (all shapes and sizes, vertical and
>>>>>> horizontal, all very stable), keep fresh catnip rubbed on each, and
>>>>>> praise them when they use one.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Hugs,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> CatNipped
>>>>> My adopoted cat has no interest in catnip OR in the scratching things
>>>>> I've gotten for her. She does like to inflict damage on good furniture,
>>>>> if I get behind on nail-clipping.
>>>> Usually the problem, when they don't like scratching posts, is the type
>>>> you've provided (cats are as picky about those as they are about food).
>>>> There is the stand-up kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and wood,
>>>> then there's the horizontal kind: carpet covered, sisal covered, and a
>>>> kind of cardboard that some cats like. Be sure any scratching post has
>>>> a wide enough base that it doesn't tip or sway when the cat puts his
>>>> whole weight on it. If it is unstable he won't use it. If catnip
>>>> doesn't work you might try some Valerian root - some cats prefer that
>>>> even over catnip.
>>>>
>>> Alpine Scratcher works every time.
>> Not with Meep. Carpet or nuttin' for her. Won't touch Sissal. Even
>> tried, and failed to improve her opinion of it, once.
>>
>> She has shown some interest in scratching the wood banister in our new
>> house though. First time ever she's scratched at something that does not
>> belong to just her. I think it's because she can stretch high to do it.
>> Guess I'll need to find a cat tree that has a very long wooden post.
>>
>> jmc
>
> Mine *lurve* this one (from PetsMart):
> http://www.possibleplaces.com/catnipped/Nipped/100_0735.jpg - it has one
> sisal post, one carpeted post, and one wooden post. It's *very* stable - 20
> pound Sammy can get a running start, jump onto the sisal post and climb up
> into the little house on top, without it even wobbling.
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped
>
>

I've seen that one. If that second looong post was anything but sissal,
I'd get it. There's a great big cat show hereabouts next month, so I'm
going for the vendors, not for the foofie kitties. I want to get
something tall but easy to climb for my getting-creaky-like-me kitty.

jmc

cshenk
August 20th 08, 03:01 AM
"Xas" wrote

> Train them the way their mother would - yowl at them when they stick the
> claws in and make little cat spitting noises. If they persist, try a light
> smack or flick on the paw, about the same force a mother cat would use for
> a reprimand. Not enough to hurt, but enough to show you're not happy. But,
> it has to be immediate. No doubt some people will wig out at this advice,
> but remember, cats *do* smack each other when they are slightly annoyed.
> They are not politically correct about smacking the kids. It's their
> early warning signal. It means watch your step or there's worse to come.
> And yes, you are the cat's mother now.

LOL! I never really thought of it that way. A very *light* sort of thing
with a 'You ****ed me off' sort of voice right at the moment is also
something I do if they are in my lap. I dont yell, but I have a deep (for a
woman) voice and drive it deeper and and let anger show as I tap the
offending paw with 2 fingers. Then, I shuffle them off and don't wanna play
(wont even if i wanna) for a little bit.

My apologies, some of this has as said, become instinct after so many years
of cats.

I not only do not declaw, I no longer need to regular clip unless the cat is
aged and getting kitty alzheimers sort of thing (side note, older cats who
seem to have that often have medical issues causing it so if an older cat
starts clawing, vet time! Not mentioned often but first sign I saw of one
with a kidney problem many moons ago)

cshenk
August 20th 08, 03:23 AM
"jmc" wrote

> Variety of methods with Meep. First, I bought the scratching post before
> I even brought the kitten home.

Hehehehe not uncommon!

> Then, whenever she'd go to scratch on anything, I'd carry her over to the
> post and set her front paws on it, praising her lavishly when she
> scratched on it. Result: Aside from her recent interest in our wooden
> banister, in 12 years and something like 5 moves (and lord knows how many
> hotel rooms, she's truly Meep the TravelCat), she's never, ever scratched
> on anything but her own stuff.

It works. They love approval as much as we do.

> Scratching people, I used the "yowl, tap and ignore" method. If she
> scratched me in play, I'd yowl, tap her gently on the paw or nose, then
> completely ignore her. Same with biting.
>
> She was very cute though. She learned quickly that biting was *not
> allowed* but that licking was OK. When she was younger, she did not like
> to be picked up. When I'd pick her up, she'd make this quick "bite"
> movement with her head towards my arm, then lick it furiously. It was soo
> cute. She now loves being picked up, so hasn't done that in years.

I am working on this with Daisy at *her* pace. No one knows her history but
we can assume from her behavior that she was 'abused' by kids? She does not
accept them well but runs vice attacks. She is very reactive to under age
10 kids.

> More recently, I've been teaching her not to knead with her claws. If she
> pricks me, I pick her up and clip her claws. In the beginning it wasn't
> really training, just self-protection. But, she's learned to avoid
> getting her claws clipped, by keeping them sheathed when she's on my lap
> :)

Close here on that. I just nip off a tiny bit so if needed for a later
lesson, I do not run out of 'claw room'.

John Doe
September 2nd 08, 09:05 AM
"cshenk" > wrote:

> Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and
> would never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just
> unaware of how to train a cat to not damage things or skin. So,
> how about a few tips and tricks you all use?

Clipping them is not difficult if you catch the cat when taking a
nap.

Stan Brown
September 3rd 08, 01:02 AM
Tue, 02 Sep 2008 08:05:46 GMT from John Doe
>:
> "cshenk" > wrote:
>
> > Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and
> > would never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just
> > unaware of how to train a cat to not damage things or skin. So,
> > how about a few tips and tricks you all use?
>
> Clipping them is not difficult if you catch the cat when taking a
> nap.

Is that for real? I can't imagine acat not waking up the moment
someone grabs its paws.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

John Doe
September 3rd 08, 03:34 AM
Stan Brown > wrote:

> Tue, 02 Sep 2008 08:05:46 GMT from John Doe

>> "cshenk" > wrote:
>>
>> > Hi! Thought of a slightly new thread. Most here are like me and
>> > would never declaw a cat. People who do that often are just
>> > unaware of how to train a cat to not damage things or skin. So,
>> > how about a few tips and tricks you all use?
>>
>> Clipping them is not difficult if you catch the cat when taking a
>> nap.
>
> Is that for real? I can't imagine a cat not waking up the moment
> someone grabs its paws.

Yeah, also might be difficult not to imagine grabbing its paws. Takes
me some concentration to remember to be gentle and speak gently to it
as I am preparing to clip its claws since it's a tense moment. I am
constrained by the amount of time the cat is able to become fully
alert. Grabbing it wouldn't work. Some cats can go from asleep to 3
feet in the air when they are startled. But the grogginess of a nap
can last a little while depending on you and the house cat.

I put the cat between my legs and sit on it, with my feet somewhat
crossed so that it cannot back out. Then you can use one arm to block
the cat from moving forwards and that hand to hold one of its paws at
the same time. The area should be brightly lit ahead of time and the
clippers ready. If necessary, you can tack a small piece of packaging
tape on the paw you aren't clipping first. If you really want to clip
its claws and you want to make it easier, you could probably easily
make/find a sock or something for the unclipped paw, for while you are
clipping the other paw. And you might want to wear jeans. For me,
maybe the most difficult thing is remembering to notice when it's
taking a nap and have the time to do the clipping.

Good luck.


--
The first big front wheel rollerblades.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2565924423/