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Stacey Weinberger
August 30th 08, 12:28 AM
Hi,

When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a fan.
Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them with a
mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it help them
after that?

Thanks,

Stacey

--

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"It's all about the wood."

dejablues[_4_]
August 30th 08, 02:52 AM
"Stacey Weinberger" > wrote in message
m...
> Hi,
>
> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
> cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a fan.
> Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them with a
> mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it help
> them after that?

Is that the temperature outside or the temperature inside your house? Are
they laying about in distress and panting? Do they have a cool place to lie
(tile floor, bathtub) and plenty of cold water to drink?
If you are uncomfortably hot, your cats probably feel worse, so get some
A/C. Wetting them is probably not a good idea. A wet cat has a tougher time
cooling down than a dry cat. The wet coat holds the hair against the skin
and prevents air flow.

Stacey Weinberger
August 30th 08, 03:41 AM
>> Hi,
>>
>> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
>> cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a fan.
>> Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them with a
>> mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it help
>> them after that?
>
> Is that the temperature outside or the temperature inside your house? Are
> they laying about in distress and panting? Do they have a cool place to
> lie (tile floor, bathtub) and plenty of cold water to drink?
> If you are uncomfortably hot, your cats probably feel worse, so get some
> A/C. Wetting them is probably not a good idea. A wet cat has a tougher
> time cooling down than a dry cat. The wet coat holds the hair against the
> skin and prevents air flow.

That's the temp outside. They aren't lying in distress or panting. They
are on the floor spread out looking hot especially Snowball who is part
Himmy. I looked into AC ($500 plus) and can't afford it or the high bills.
Plus I don't want to leave it on while I'm at work. It gets hot in the
latter part of the day until the sun sets over the trees. There are just
three days at a time when it is really hot then the marine layer kicks in.
It's cooler downstairs during the day but they don't think to go there. Yes
there is a bathtub and sink but no tile floor.

dejablues[_4_]
August 30th 08, 04:11 AM
"Stacey Weinberger" > wrote in message
m...
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
>>> cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a
>>> fan. Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them
>>> with a mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it
>>> help them after that?
>>
>> Is that the temperature outside or the temperature inside your house? Are
>> they laying about in distress and panting? Do they have a cool place to
>> lie (tile floor, bathtub) and plenty of cold water to drink?
>> If you are uncomfortably hot, your cats probably feel worse, so get some
>> A/C. Wetting them is probably not a good idea. A wet cat has a tougher
>> time cooling down than a dry cat. The wet coat holds the hair against the
>> skin and prevents air flow.
>
> That's the temp outside. They aren't lying in distress or panting. They
> are on the floor spread out looking hot especially Snowball who is part
> Himmy. I looked into AC ($500 plus) and can't afford it or the high
> bills.

Small room AC units cost a lot less than $500.00 bucks. The newer ones have
thermostats that you can set so ...

> Plus I don't want to leave it on while I'm at work.

you can leave it on and it only kicks in when the room reaches a certain
temperature.


> It gets hot in the latter part of the day until the sun sets over the
> trees. There are just three days at a time when it is really hot then the
> marine layer kicks in.


Never heard of a marine layer, I just know that I could never live without
AC, and wouldn't force my cats to , even if I had to eat mac-n-cheese all
summer!


> It's cooler downstairs during the day but they don't think to go there.

Then they must be fine where they are?


> there is a bathtub and sink but no tile floor.
>

Stacey Weinberger
August 30th 08, 04:31 AM
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way
>>>> to cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a
>>>> fan. Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them
>>>> with a mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will
>>>> it help them after that?
>>>
>>> Is that the temperature outside or the temperature inside your house?
>>> Are they laying about in distress and panting? Do they have a cool
>>> place to lie (tile floor, bathtub) and plenty of cold water to drink?
>>> If you are uncomfortably hot, your cats probably feel worse, so get some
>>> A/C. Wetting them is probably not a good idea. A wet cat has a tougher
>>> time cooling down than a dry cat. The wet coat holds the hair against
>>> the skin and prevents air flow.
>>
>> That's the temp outside. They aren't lying in distress or panting. They
>> are on the floor spread out looking hot especially Snowball who is part
>> Himmy. I looked into AC ($500 plus) and can't afford it or the high
>> bills.
>
> Small room AC units cost a lot less than $500.00 bucks. The newer ones
> have thermostats that you can set so ...
>
>> Plus I don't want to leave it on while I'm at work.
>
> you can leave it on and it only kicks in when the room reaches a certain
> temperature.
>
>
>> It gets hot in the latter part of the day until the sun sets over the
>> trees. There are just three days at a time when it is really hot then the
>> marine layer kicks in.
>
>
> Never heard of a marine layer, I just know that I could never live without
> AC, and wouldn't force my cats to , even if I had to eat mac-n-cheese all
> summer!
>
>
>> It's cooler downstairs during the day but they don't think to go there.
>
> Then they must be fine where they are?

They probably are but I just worry about them sometimes! They just "look"
hot. I didn't know AC did that, but I never grew up with it and never lived
in a house or an apt. with it. I'm about at the mac and cheese stage as it
is! I live in the San Francisco bay area. The marine layer is the coolness
from the ocean and the fog coming back in. Heat waves never really last
more than three days. The boys do eat well though (a little plug for
myself!). They both have health issues. Sebastian has FLUTD under control
and Snowball can't have any grain or vegetable matter. They are both on
Wysong Au Jus with Feline Instincts TC for the supplements and a little
water added (Sebastian's surgeon is the one who recommended doing this to
keep him diluted). This diet (found through either the IBD list or the
FLUTD list, I forget) works for both of them. I adopted a semi feral cat
Moon (after getting dumped by owners twice) who get canned Wellness
supplemented with California Natural dry. Her furs are very soft on this
diet. Her previous owner just fed her IAMS dry.

dejablues[_4_]
August 30th 08, 04:58 AM
"Stacey Weinberger" > wrote in message
m...
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way
>>>>> to cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have
>>>>> a fan. Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray
>>>>> them with a mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but
>>>>> will it help them after that?
>>>>
>>>> Is that the temperature outside or the temperature inside your house?
>>>> Are they laying about in distress and panting? Do they have a cool
>>>> place to lie (tile floor, bathtub) and plenty of cold water to drink?
>>>> If you are uncomfortably hot, your cats probably feel worse, so get
>>>> some A/C. Wetting them is probably not a good idea. A wet cat has a
>>>> tougher time cooling down than a dry cat. The wet coat holds the hair
>>>> against the skin and prevents air flow.
>>>
>>> That's the temp outside. They aren't lying in distress or panting.
>>> They are on the floor spread out looking hot especially Snowball who is
>>> part Himmy. I looked into AC ($500 plus) and can't afford it or the
>>> high bills.
>>
>> Small room AC units cost a lot less than $500.00 bucks. The newer ones
>> have thermostats that you can set so ...
>>
>>> Plus I don't want to leave it on while I'm at work.
>>
>> you can leave it on and it only kicks in when the room reaches a certain
>> temperature.
>>
>>
>>> It gets hot in the latter part of the day until the sun sets over the
>>> trees. There are just three days at a time when it is really hot then
>>> the marine layer kicks in.
>>
>>
>> Never heard of a marine layer, I just know that I could never live
>> without AC, and wouldn't force my cats to , even if I had to eat
>> mac-n-cheese all summer!
>>
>>
>>> It's cooler downstairs during the day but they don't think to go there.
>>
>> Then they must be fine where they are?
>
> They probably are but I just worry about them sometimes! They just "look"
> hot. I didn't know AC did that, but I never grew up with it and never
> lived in a house or an apt. with it. I'm about at the mac and cheese
> stage as it is! I live in the San Francisco bay area. The marine layer
> is the coolness from the ocean and the fog coming back in. Heat waves
> never really last more than three days. The boys do eat well though (a
> little plug for myself!). They both have health issues. Sebastian has
> FLUTD under control and Snowball can't have any grain or vegetable matter.
> They are both on Wysong Au Jus with Feline Instincts TC for the
> supplements and a little water added (Sebastian's surgeon is the one who
> recommended doing this to keep him diluted). This diet (found through
> either the IBD list or the FLUTD list, I forget) works for both of them.
> I adopted a semi feral cat Moon (after getting dumped by owners twice)
> who get canned Wellness supplemented with California Natural dry. Her
> furs are very soft on this diet. Her previous owner just fed her IAMS
> dry.

Getting them to drink enough water is important, but can be difficult. I
have a cat that is prone to FLUTD (had PU surgery in June) , so I constantly
change the water in the dishes and fill the sinks and let the taps drip in
the bathtubs, anything to get them to drink!

cshenk
August 30th 08, 06:33 AM
> "Stacey Weinberger" wrote

>> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
>> cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a fan.
>> Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them with a
>> mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it help
>> them after that?

Stacy, get a few fans and set them so they make a gentle breeze bouncing off
a wall and back to where they may lay.

Stampir
August 30th 08, 11:18 PM
"dejablues" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Stacey Weinberger" > wrote in message
> m...
>> Hi,
>>
>> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
>> cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a fan.
>> Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them with a
>> mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it help
>> them after that?
>
> Is that the temperature outside or the temperature inside your house? Are
> they laying about in distress and panting? Do they have a cool place to
> lie (tile floor, bathtub) and plenty of cold water to drink?
> If you are uncomfortably hot, your cats probably feel worse, so get some
> A/C. Wetting them is probably not a good idea. A wet cat has a tougher
> time cooling down than a dry cat. The wet coat holds the hair against the
> skin and prevents air flow.

It depends how dry the air is. Try taking a swim in the pool in Vegas during
the summer and getting out -- the fact you dry out quickly is because of
evaporation which removes heat and keeps you cool a fact of physics that
works for felines as well. That's why Tigers like to swim!

CatNipped[_2_]
September 2nd 08, 05:59 PM
"Stacey Weinberger" > wrote in message
m...
> Hi,
>
> When it's a hot day, in the upper 80s/lower 90s what is the best way to
> cool off your cats. My house is not air conditioned but I do have a fan.
> Is it okay to wipe them down with a damp wash cloth? Spray them with a
> mister? I know they won't be happy about it at first but will it help
> them after that?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Stacey

Cats evolved in the desert, so they are probably more able to cope with the
heat than you are. If you don't have A/C, they have should have already
shedded their winter coat and are prepared for the hot weather. Their hair
grows in two layers, undercoat and overcoat (even short-haired cats have an
"undercoat"), and it is able to insulate from both heat and cold. I
wouldn't wet them down, that would counteract the insulating properties of
their coats. Unless they are in distress (panting and lethargic), I'd say
they are probably just fine. They won't be as active in the heat, and they
usually eat less because of that.

Needless to say, always have fresh water available for them to drink -
putting an ice cube in their water bowl is often appreciated and will get
them to drink more. Also, since cats evolved in the desert, they are
"oportunistic" drinkers - they drink some water whenever they find a new
"watering hole". Because of that, I've found that, if I move my cats' water
bowls around to different spots, they drink more water than if their bowls
remain in the same spot. Also, I have a Drinkwell Fountain for them since a
few of mine like to drink from running water sources.

Hugs,

CatNipped


>
> --
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> "It's all about the wood."
>

Richard Evans
September 2nd 08, 06:41 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote:

>
>Cats evolved in the desert, so they are probably more able to cope with the
>heat than you are. If you don't have A/C, they have should have already
>shedded their winter coat and are prepared for the hot weather. Their hair
>grows in two layers, undercoat and overcoat (even short-haired cats have an
>"undercoat"), and it is able to insulate from both heat and cold.


From a Discovery Channel documentary on cats many years ago, I recall
they they have very high tolerance for heat. There was footage of a
cat snoozing comfortably above a blacksmith's forge at a distance that
seemed like it should have fried him.

cybercat
September 2nd 08, 08:11 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote
>
> From a Discovery Channel documentary on cats many years ago, I recall
> they they have very high tolerance for heat. There was footage of a
> cat snoozing comfortably above a blacksmith's forge at a distance that
> seemed like it should have fried him.

Still, they are not fond of stuffy summer heat. Mine found a way to lie on
the hardwoods or slate or tile the summer our AC failed, even though we had
fans all over.

CatNipped[_2_]
September 2nd 08, 08:24 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> "CatNipped" > wrote:
>
>>
>>Cats evolved in the desert, so they are probably more able to cope with
>>the
>>heat than you are. If you don't have A/C, they have should have already
>>shedded their winter coat and are prepared for the hot weather. Their
>>hair
>>grows in two layers, undercoat and overcoat (even short-haired cats have
>>an
>>"undercoat"), and it is able to insulate from both heat and cold.
>
>
> From a Discovery Channel documentary on cats many years ago, I recall
> they they have very high tolerance for heat. There was footage of a
> cat snoozing comfortably above a blacksmith's forge at a distance that
> seemed like it should have fried him.

Yep! Temperatures in the dessert can reach triple digits during the day and
then plummet to near freezing at night. This is why cats sleep up to 18
hours a day - while evolving, they survived by sleeping both through the
heat of the day and through the frigid nights and hunted at dawn and dusk
(thus are they crepuscular, not, as many believe, nocturnal). It also
explains why cats are "obligate carnivores" - there was very little
vegetation available for animals larger than mouse size, and the only
vegetation they ingested was that which had already been partially digested
by their prey. It's also why most cats die from kidney failure - people
don't understand that they need to get most of their fluid intake with their
food rather than from drinking water; since there was *very* little free
water in their environment for them to drink, they do not naturally seek
water.

Hugs,

CatNipped

CatNipped[_2_]
September 2nd 08, 08:33 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Richard Evans" > wrote
>>
>> From a Discovery Channel documentary on cats many years ago, I recall
>> they they have very high tolerance for heat. There was footage of a
>> cat snoozing comfortably above a blacksmith's forge at a distance that
>> seemed like it should have fried him.
>
> Still, they are not fond of stuffy summer heat. Mine found a way to lie on
> the hardwoods or slate or tile the summer our AC failed, even though we
> had fans all over.

True - "surviving" is a whole lot different from "enjoying"! ;>

But what probably was a factor in your case was that they had not had
sufficient time to adjust from AC to non-AC heat as they would have had you
not had AC at all. Mine don't really go through a lot of shedding since DH
keeps our house set on deep-freeze year round! They'd probably be very put
out if my AC ever konked out (heaven forbid)!

Hugs,

CatNipped