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jmcquown[_2_]
September 3rd 08, 03:04 PM
I'm taking part of the "I can relate" thread and starting it over here,
mostly to reply to something Sherry posted. Hope you don't mind!

Sherry wrote:
> On Aug 30, 7:21?am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>>>
>>>> My doctor is now waffling about whether or not I need surgery. I
>>>> think he's figured out I don't have health insurance.
>>
>
> was causing him a lot of discomfort. But the surgeon then wanted to do
> a colonoscopy! WHY?
> On a patient who was already quickly deteriorating from kidney
> failure. BECAUSE HE HAD
> MEDICARE, AND A SUPPLEMENT THAT PAID 100%. I swear there are docs that
> MILK
> medicare and do procedures on people that are just not necessary.
>
Oh, tell me about it! For a while Mom was refusing to take her prescription
meds. She takes a ton of them every day, some of them several times a day.
I looked all of them up and it appeared to me there was some duplication.
(And yes, they were all prescribed by the same guy.) I'm no doctor. Maybe
there is a good reason for her to be taking (just throwing this out as an
example) two different medicines for high blood pressure. But I also think
the sheer number of pills she has to take every day is overwhelming, which
is why she balks at taking them.

So I called her doctor. I explained the situation to his nurse. I told
her Mom feels okay, she's not having any symptoms or anything. I was told
she'd have to come in and bring all her prescriptions with her and they'd
see if things could be changed. Why do they have to see her?!

I'll tell you what I think. They charge $175 for an office visit. There's
a big sign at reception: "Uninsured patients must pay $175 office visit fee
at the time of service." But see, she has Medicare. And TriCare for Life
pays what Medicare doesn't cover. So if she walks in the door, boom! They
get to bill $175.

When I was here in the spring she had a problem. A short term prescription
got it cleared up. Still, they wanted her to come back every 2 weeks! I
ask you again, WHY? Two guesses and the first one doesn't count ;)

BTW, since I told Mom I was going to take her to the doctor she promised to
(and has been good about) take her pills again. LOL

> How do YOU feel? Do you have a lot of discomfort? If so, I don't think
> your doc should approach it
> like it's an elective surgery or something, asking you what *you*
> want! I would guess that if you
> were covered by a good insurance policy, you'd already be scheduled.
>
Yeah, that's what I figure too. I feel okay. I'm back on an antibiotic,
though, because this past Monday I thought I was maybe feeling twinges of
the same discomfort that started this whole thing back in June. The doctor
had told me to call immediately if I even *thought* it was coming back.

> I'm sorry for the rant. I realize this is none of my bizwax but it
> really hits a nerve. You deserve the
> same care as anyone else, and your ability to pay should NOT factor
> into your diagnosis or care plan.
> Sherry


Rant away! I'm right there with you on this. As for my medical bills, I'll
what I can, when I can. The bitch of it is I can't even *think* about
getting even a part time job, because taking care of Mom is a full time gig,
you know?

Jill

Mark Edwards
September 3rd 08, 03:26 PM
[medical annoyances]

When I had the weekend stay in the hospital, I dreaded the bill.

When the bill came in, it stated "paid by insurance" for the entire
amount. I heaved a sigh of relief.

Well, except for a portion of the radiology. And a portion of the fees for
two doctors I saw for ten minutes. And a portion of the fee for
consultation with an opthamologist who I never saw at all...

This "nickel and dime" billing afterwards is one of the things that really
gets on my nerves.


Hugs and Purrs,
Mark
--
Proof of Sanity Forged Upon Request

jmcquown[_2_]
September 3rd 08, 03:37 PM
Mark Edwards wrote:
> [medical annoyances]
>
> When the bill came in, it stated "paid by insurance" for the entire
> amount. I heaved a sigh of relief.
>
> Well, except for a portion of the radiology. And a portion of the
> fees for two doctors I saw for ten minutes. And a portion of the fee
> for consultation with an opthamologist who I never saw at all...
>
Contest that!!!

> This "nickel and dime" billing afterwards is one of the things that
> really gets on my nerves.
>
>
> Hugs and Purrs,
> Mark


Here's the deal. I was approved by the hospital for 100% financial aid.
For services provided BY the hospital. Which includes practically nothing.
The room charges and nursing staff and nurses aides are included. That's
about it.

Pretty much everything else is handled by (and billed by) outside providers.
Oh, there are doctors they call "hospitalers". They don't have private
practices. They're also all residents or interns under supervision.
Everything else, the radiologist, all the labs for blood work, etc. isn't
part of the hospital charges. So while it's great the hospital isn't going
to charge me as thought I were staying in a hotel with room service (heh)
the majority of the bills are from all these outside providers. One doctor
who was on call that weekend spent maybe 2 minutes with me and sent me a
bill for $900. It's ridiculous. He didn't DO anything.

Jill

tanadashoes
September 3rd 08, 07:48 PM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
. ..
>
> Rant away! I'm right there with you on this. As for my medical bills,
> I'll what I can, when I can. The bitch of it is I can't even *think*
> about getting even a part time job, because taking care of Mom is a full
> time gig, you know?
>
>

The doctors here gripe their heads off about Tricare insurance. Some won't
take any Tricare standard (Mandy and me) or Tricare Extra, but man they want
those Tricare Prime and Tricare for Life (Rob) patients. They can really
pad the bills for them. However, most Tricare Prime get seen at the
military clinics. The rest of us aren't good enough for them.

Pam S. who spends a lot of her time disgusted by the greed of the medical
profession

September 3rd 08, 07:57 PM
Mark Edwards > wrote:

> When the bill came in, it stated "paid by insurance" for the entire
> amount. I heaved a sigh of relief.

> Well, except for a portion of the radiology. And a portion of the fees
> for two doctors I saw for ten minutes. And a portion of the fee for
> consultation with an opthamologist who I never saw at all...

> This "nickel and dime" billing afterwards is one of the things that
> really gets on my nerves.

I know what you mean! About 10 years ago, I had a bad reaction to
antibiotics and ended up in the ER for several hours. I was never
admitted, and in all, I was there for less than 24 hours, but managed
to rack up quite a bill, insurance notwithstanding. I was aghast at
how many *different* bills I kept getting, one for this specialist,
another for that department, more for medicines, etc, etc. When did
they stop just billing once for everything, centrally?

At one point while I was there, someone showed up at my bedside saying
that she'd heard I had asthma and would I like to try a new gadget for
my inhaler? I didn't have any other pressing engagements, so I said sure,
and pretty soon I had a bunch of new equipment to take home. I wasn't
thinking very clearly at the time (and I hadn't been in the hospital for
years and had never experienced this before, or I would've known better),
but OF COURSE, I was charged a hefty sum for this consultation and the
gadgets. It really aggravated me because I wasn't even there for asthma!
It was like, since they had me, why not read my charts and see what else
they could sell me?

I got bills associated with that visit for months and months.

--
Joyce ^..^

(To email me, remove the X's from my user name.)

Jofirey
September 3rd 08, 10:17 PM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
. ..
> I'm taking part of the "I can relate" thread and starting it over
> here, mostly to reply to something Sherry posted. Hope you don't
> mind!
>
> Sherry wrote:
>> On Aug 30, 7:21?am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> My doctor is now waffling about whether or not I need surgery. I
>>>>> think he's figured out I don't have health insurance.
>>>
>>
>> was causing him a lot of discomfort. But the surgeon then wanted to
>> do
>> a colonoscopy! WHY?
>> On a patient who was already quickly deteriorating from kidney
>> failure. BECAUSE HE HAD
>> MEDICARE, AND A SUPPLEMENT THAT PAID 100%. I swear there are docs
>> that
>> MILK
>> medicare and do procedures on people that are just not necessary.
>>
> Oh, tell me about it! For a while Mom was refusing to take her
> prescription meds. She takes a ton of them every day, some of them
> several times a day. I looked all of them up and it appeared to me
> there was some duplication. (And yes, they were all prescribed by
> the same guy.) I'm no doctor. Maybe there is a good reason for her
> to be taking (just throwing this out as an example) two different
> medicines for high blood pressure. But I also think the sheer
> number of pills she has to take every day is overwhelming, which is
> why she balks at taking them.
>
> So I called her doctor. I explained the situation to his nurse. I
> told her Mom feels okay, she's not having any symptoms or anything.
> I was told she'd have to come in and bring all her prescriptions
> with her and they'd see if things could be changed. Why do they
> have to see her?!
>
> I'll tell you what I think. They charge $175 for an office visit.
> There's a big sign at reception: "Uninsured patients must pay $175
> office visit fee at the time of service." But see, she has
> Medicare. And TriCare for Life pays what Medicare doesn't cover.
> So if she walks in the door, boom! They get to bill $175.
>

If it makes you feel any better, it isn't like they get paid $175
every time they see her.

I don't have one of my Medicare payment things handy but I think they
actually get more like $40 between Medicare and TriCare.

Jo

jmcquown[_2_]
September 4th 08, 12:15 AM
Jofirey wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> . ..
>> I'm taking part of the "I can relate" thread and starting it over
>> here, mostly to reply to something Sherry posted. Hope you don't
>> mind!
>>
>> Sherry wrote:
>>> On Aug 30, 7:21?am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> My doctor is now waffling about whether or not I need surgery. I
>>>>>> think he's figured out I don't have health insurance.
>>>>
>>>
>>> was causing him a lot of discomfort. But the surgeon then wanted to
>>> do
>>> a colonoscopy! WHY?
>>> On a patient who was already quickly deteriorating from kidney
>>> failure. BECAUSE HE HAD
>>> MEDICARE, AND A SUPPLEMENT THAT PAID 100%. I swear there are docs
>>> that
>>> MILK
>>> medicare and do procedures on people that are just not necessary.
>>>
>> Oh, tell me about it! For a while Mom was refusing to take her
>> prescription meds. She takes a ton of them every day, some of them
>> several times a day. I looked all of them up and it appeared to me
>> there was some duplication. (And yes, they were all prescribed by
>> the same guy.) I'm no doctor. Maybe there is a good reason for her
>> to be taking (just throwing this out as an example) two different
>> medicines for high blood pressure. But I also think the sheer
>> number of pills she has to take every day is overwhelming, which is
>> why she balks at taking them.
>>
>> So I called her doctor. I explained the situation to his nurse. I
>> told her Mom feels okay, she's not having any symptoms or anything.
>> I was told she'd have to come in and bring all her prescriptions
>> with her and they'd see if things could be changed. Why do they
>> have to see her?!
>>
>> I'll tell you what I think. They charge $175 for an office visit.
>> There's a big sign at reception: "Uninsured patients must pay $175
>> office visit fee at the time of service." But see, she has
>> Medicare. And TriCare for Life pays what Medicare doesn't cover.
>> So if she walks in the door, boom! They get to bill $175.
>>
>
> If it makes you feel any better, it isn't like they get paid $175
> every time they see her.
>
> I don't have one of my Medicare payment things handy but I think they
> actually get more like $40 between Medicare and TriCare.
>
> Jo

No, it doesn't really make me feel any better LOL I know all about "fee
schedules". I worked for an HMO and a PPO in a previous lifetime ;) They
still get paid something, and that was my point. But you knew that. Her
doctor didn't need to see her to review her list of medications. They're in
her file. She isn't having any problems, I told them that. Trust me, if
she was having problems I'd be the first one to drag her to the doctor.

Jill

Outsider
September 4th 08, 01:33 AM
"jmcquown" > wrote in
:

> I'm taking part of the "I can relate" thread and starting it over
> here, mostly to reply to something Sherry posted. Hope you don't
> mind!
>
> Sherry wrote:
>> On Aug 30, 7:21?am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> My doctor is now waffling about whether or not I need surgery. I
>>>>> think he's figured out I don't have health insurance.
>>>
>>
>> was causing him a lot of discomfort. But the surgeon then wanted to
>> do a colonoscopy! WHY?
>> On a patient who was already quickly deteriorating from kidney
>> failure. BECAUSE HE HAD
>> MEDICARE, AND A SUPPLEMENT THAT PAID 100%. I swear there are docs
>> that MILK
>> medicare and do procedures on people that are just not necessary.
>>
> Oh, tell me about it! For a while Mom was refusing to take her
> prescription meds. She takes a ton of them every day, some of them
> several times a day. I looked all of them up and it appeared to me
> there was some duplication. (And yes, they were all prescribed by the
> same guy.) I'm no doctor. Maybe there is a good reason for her to be
> taking (just throwing this out as an example) two different medicines
> for high blood pressure. But I also think the sheer number of pills
> she has to take every day is overwhelming, which is why she balks at
> taking them.
>
> So I called her doctor. I explained the situation to his nurse. I
> told her Mom feels okay, she's not having any symptoms or anything. I
> was told she'd have to come in and bring all her prescriptions with
> her and they'd see if things could be changed. Why do they have to
> see her?!
>
> I'll tell you what I think. They charge $175 for an office visit.
> There's a big sign at reception: "Uninsured patients must pay $175
> office visit fee at the time of service." But see, she has Medicare.
> And TriCare for Life pays what Medicare doesn't cover. So if she
> walks in the door, boom! They get to bill $175.
>
> When I was here in the spring she had a problem. A short term
> prescription got it cleared up. Still, they wanted her to come back
> every 2 weeks! I ask you again, WHY? Two guesses and the first one
> doesn't count ;)
>
> BTW, since I told Mom I was going to take her to the doctor she
> promised to (and has been good about) take her pills again. LOL
>
>> How do YOU feel? Do you have a lot of discomfort? If so, I don't
>> think your doc should approach it
>> like it's an elective surgery or something, asking you what *you*
>> want! I would guess that if you
>> were covered by a good insurance policy, you'd already be scheduled.
>>
> Yeah, that's what I figure too. I feel okay. I'm back on an
> antibiotic, though, because this past Monday I thought I was maybe
> feeling twinges of the same discomfort that started this whole thing
> back in June. The doctor had told me to call immediately if I even
> *thought* it was coming back.
>
>> I'm sorry for the rant. I realize this is none of my bizwax but it
>> really hits a nerve. You deserve the
>> same care as anyone else, and your ability to pay should NOT factor
>> into your diagnosis or care plan.
>> Sherry
>
>
> Rant away! I'm right there with you on this. As for my medical
> bills, I'll what I can, when I can. The bitch of it is I can't even
> *think* about getting even a part time job, because taking care of Mom
> is a full time gig, you know?
>
> Jill
>





You really should stop asking questions you already know the answer to.

Outsider
September 4th 08, 01:36 AM
Mark Edwards > wrote in
m:

>
> [medical annoyances]
>
> When I had the weekend stay in the hospital, I dreaded the bill.
>
> When the bill came in, it stated "paid by insurance" for the entire
> amount. I heaved a sigh of relief.
>
> Well, except for a portion of the radiology. And a portion of the fees
> for two doctors I saw for ten minutes. And a portion of the fee for
> consultation with an opthamologist who I never saw at all...
>
> This "nickel and dime" billing afterwards is one of the things that
> really gets on my nerves.
>
>
> Hugs and Purrs,
> Mark


And each bill comes separate and spread out over months and none of them
can be paid online and and ..... AND all of this when you, likely, feel
like crap to start with. But I am repeating myself now.

Outsider
September 4th 08, 01:40 AM
"Jofirey" > wrote in news:gkDvk.20079$cW3.15088
@nlpi064.nbdc.sbc.com:


>
> If it makes you feel any better, it isn't like they get paid $175
> every time they see her.
>
> I don't have one of my Medicare payment things handy but I think they
> actually get more like $40 between Medicare and TriCare.
>
> Jo
>
>


That's a lot more than I make for 5-10 minutes of my time.

Jofirey
September 4th 08, 03:00 AM
"outsider" > wrote in message
...
> "Jofirey" > wrote in
> news:gkDvk.20079$cW3.15088
> @nlpi064.nbdc.sbc.com:
>
>
>>
>> If it makes you feel any better, it isn't like they get paid $175
>> every time they see her.
>>
>> I don't have one of my Medicare payment things handy but I think
>> they
>> actually get more like $40 between Medicare and TriCare.
>>
>> Jo
>>
>>
>
>
> That's a lot more than I make for 5-10 minutes of my time.

I'll bite. How much does it cost you for support staff for 5-10
minutes of your time? How about cost for facilities? Insurance
premiums? Education?

Most doctors do not make anything like the amount of money the general
public assumes they do. Plenty of them live a pretty normal middle
class existence and are lucky to pay off their school loans by the
time their own kids are in college.

(And yes at one time I knew exactly what most of the doctors around
here earned every year)

Jo

jmcquown[_2_]
September 4th 08, 05:13 AM
Jofirey wrote:
> "outsider" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Jofirey" > wrote in
>> news:gkDvk.20079$cW3.15088
>> @nlpi064.nbdc.sbc.com:
>>
>>
>>>
>>> If it makes you feel any better, it isn't like they get paid $175
>>> every time they see her.
>>>
>>> I don't have one of my Medicare payment things handy but I think
>>> they
>>> actually get more like $40 between Medicare and TriCare.
>>>
>>> Jo
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> That's a lot more than I make for 5-10 minutes of my time.
>
> I'll bite. How much does it cost you for support staff for 5-10
> minutes of your time? How about cost for facilities? Insurance
> premiums? Education?
>
Considering the doctor in question (in my original post) doesn't support the
staff of the hospital, I'd say zero.


> Most doctors do not make anything like the amount of money the general
> public assumes they do. Plenty of them live a pretty normal middle
> class existence and are lucky to pay off their school loans by the
> time their own kids are in college.
>
Funny, I asked him if he was related to the orthodontist of similar name I
had when I was 12 and lived here before. He said, "No, but I think I'm
still paying for his house." I got my braces in 1972. That speaks volumes.
Maybe he should have gone into specialized dentistry or orthodontics.

My primary care physician back in Memphis? He went to high school with my
older brother. He's four or five years older than me. He was adding a
"mother in law house" in his back yard by his pool. I remember when this
guy drove an old beat up van. LOL He more than recouped his losses. For
all I know he's knee deep in debt but that isn't my (or his other patients')
problem. He lost his hair in the process, too.

Jill

Sherry
September 4th 08, 02:18 PM
On Sep 3, 9:04�am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
> I'm taking part of the "I can relate" thread and starting it over here,
> mostly to reply to something Sherry posted. �Hope you don't mind!
>
> Sherry wrote:
> > On Aug 30, 7:21?am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>
> >>>> My doctor is now waffling about whether or not I need surgery. I
> >>>> think he's figured out I don't have health insurance.
>
> > was causing him a lot of discomfort. But the surgeon then wanted to do
> > a colonoscopy! WHY?
> > On a patient who was already quickly deteriorating from kidney
> > failure. BECAUSE HE HAD
> > MEDICARE, AND A SUPPLEMENT THAT PAID 100%. I swear there are docs that
> > MILK
> > medicare and do procedures on people that are just not necessary.
>
> Oh, tell me about it! �For a while Mom was refusing to take her prescription
> meds. �She takes a ton of them every day, some of them several times a day.
> I looked all of them up and it appeared to me there was some duplication.
> (And yes, they were all prescribed by the same guy.) �I'm no doctor. �Maybe
> there is a good reason for her to be taking (just throwing this out as an
> example) two different medicines for high blood pressure. �But I also think
> the sheer number of pills she has to take every day is overwhelming, which
> is why she balks at taking them.
>
> So I called her doctor. � I explained the situation to his nurse. �I told
> her Mom feels okay, she's not having any symptoms or anything. �I was told
> she'd have to come in and bring all her prescriptions with her and they'd
> see if things could be changed. �Why do they have to see her?!
>
> I'll tell you what I think. �They charge $175 for an office visit.. �There's
> a big sign at reception: �"Uninsured patients must pay $175 office visit fee
> at the time of service." �But see, she has Medicare. �And TriCare for Life
> pays what Medicare doesn't cover. �So if she walks in the door, boom! �They
> get to bill $175.
>
> When I was here in the spring she had a problem. �A short term prescription
> got it cleared up. �Still, they wanted her to come back every 2 weeks! �I
> ask you again, WHY? �Two guesses and the first one doesn't count ;)
>
> BTW, since I told Mom I was going to take her to the doctor she promised to
> (and has been good about) take her pills again. �LOL
>
> > How do YOU feel? Do you have a lot of discomfort? If so, I don't think
> > your doc should approach it
> > like it's an elective surgery or something, asking you what *you*
> > want! I would guess that if you
> > were covered by a good insurance policy, you'd already be scheduled.
>
> Yeah, that's what I figure too. �I feel okay. �I'm back on an antibiotic,
> though, because this past Monday I thought I was maybe feeling twinges of
> the same discomfort that started this whole thing back in June. �The doctor
> had told me to call immediately if I even *thought* it was coming back.
>
> > I'm sorry for the rant. I realize this is none of my bizwax but it
> > really hits a nerve. You deserve the
> > same care as anyone else, and your ability to pay should NOT factor
> > into your diagnosis or care plan.
> > Sherry
>
> Rant away! �I'm right there with you on this. �As for my medical bills, I'll
> what I can, when I can. �The bitch of it is I can't even *think* about
> getting even a part time job, because taking care of Mom is a full time gig,
> you know?
>
> Jill

I know absolutely. I admire you for moving in with your mom. I would
have done the same
thing with my mom. Dad, on the other hand, was not easy to take care
of. We tried bringing
him home, and it did not work out.
Dad was on dozens of pills a day. We had to pay out-of-pocket, becuase
he did not have
Medicare D. The pharmacy bill was $1400 a month. I thought there were
a lot of pills on there
that were not necessary, too, and we did ask the doc to review the
list. He always said he would,
but then he'd usually *add* medicines to it.
Kind of a side-rant, but nursing homes administer
pills from blister-packs, not bottles with loose pills, so there is no
chance of contamination. His
medicines had just been filled a few days before he died.
I asked the nursing homes what they do with the leftover meds, and she
said they destroy them. I understand
they cannot give them to me, because some were scheduled drugs. But I
wanted to donate them
to the "Compassion Clinic" here, where docs treat poor people and give
out free meds. Many were
just common blood pressure, prostate, heart drugs, etc. etc. and the
representatives from the clinic
would have signed them out, not me. They said no, they had to be
destroyed.
Over a thousand dollars worth of drugs destroyed, and people right in
this community too poor to
buy medicine. It seemed like such a waste.

Sherry

Outsider
September 4th 08, 08:19 PM
"Jofirey" > wrote in news:ejHvk.20818$xZ.17350
@nlpi070.nbdc.sbc.com:

>
> "outsider" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Jofirey" > wrote in
>> news:gkDvk.20079$cW3.15088
>> @nlpi064.nbdc.sbc.com:
>>
>>
>>>
>>> If it makes you feel any better, it isn't like they get paid $175
>>> every time they see her.
>>>
>>> I don't have one of my Medicare payment things handy but I think
>>> they
>>> actually get more like $40 between Medicare and TriCare.
>>>
>>> Jo
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> That's a lot more than I make for 5-10 minutes of my time.
>
> I'll bite. How much does it cost you for support staff for 5-10
> minutes of your time? How about cost for facilities? Insurance
> premiums? Education?


Considerable less than this. When I ran my business for 20 years much
less but then I used computers and other technology to lower costs. It
would been insane for ne to have needed 4 support people for one
"earner" which is what I think my GP has (it might even be 5).



>
> Most doctors do not make anything like the amount of money the general
> public assumes they do.


I have no idea what most people think but no doctor I ever did work for
made anywhere near (as little as) what I make and trust me few of them
could do what I do. I have no problem with a doctor making good money
but I draw the line at sympathy for them. Well, I guess I have some
sympath with them dealing with all the insurance companies.








Plenty of them live a pretty normal middle
> class existence and are lucky to pay off their school loans by the
> time their own kids are in college.
>

> (And yes at one time I knew exactly what most of the doctors around
> here earned every year)
>
> Jo