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Daniel Mahoney
September 13th 08, 04:07 AM
Here in central Iowa we're getting heavy rain, but nothing like what the
folks in the Houston area are getting. Things are actually really mild
here. But...

Nancy was on the way home from work tonight and got delayed by a huge
traffic accident. We had plans to go out to dinner when she got home,
but since she had to get off the freeway and take side roads home we
arranged to meet at a little roadhouse in Baxter that does great steaks.
She got their a few minutes before I did and we had a wonderful dinner.

She followed me when we left to head home as she wasn't very familiar
with the route. I had only driven the route once before, but I tend to
learn roads better. Unfortunately when we left the roadhouse the rain
was falling quite heavily - heavily that it wasn't particularly easy to
see where we were going.

I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by this
drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was in
the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so terrifying,
but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.

I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.

Granby
September 13th 08, 04:12 AM
The rain scared you, as well it should and, the fact that Nancy was out in
it with you didn't help.
Your home safe now, just pray for those who weren't so lucky. I sure am
praying for them.
"Daniel Mahoney" > wrote in message
...
> Here in central Iowa we're getting heavy rain, but nothing like what the
> folks in the Houston area are getting. Things are actually really mild
> here. But...
>
> Nancy was on the way home from work tonight and got delayed by a huge
> traffic accident. We had plans to go out to dinner when she got home,
> but since she had to get off the freeway and take side roads home we
> arranged to meet at a little roadhouse in Baxter that does great steaks.
> She got their a few minutes before I did and we had a wonderful dinner.
>
> She followed me when we left to head home as she wasn't very familiar
> with the route. I had only driven the route once before, but I tend to
> learn roads better. Unfortunately when we left the roadhouse the rain
> was falling quite heavily - heavily that it wasn't particularly easy to
> see where we were going.
>
> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by this
> drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was in
> the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so terrifying,
> but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.
>
> I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.

Cheryl[_4_]
September 13th 08, 04:20 AM
"Daniel Mahoney" > wrote in message
...
> Here in central Iowa we're getting heavy rain, but nothing like what the
> folks in the Houston area are getting. Things are actually really mild
> here. But...
>
> Nancy was on the way home from work tonight and got delayed by a huge
> traffic accident. We had plans to go out to dinner when she got home,
> but since she had to get off the freeway and take side roads home we
> arranged to meet at a little roadhouse in Baxter that does great steaks.
> She got their a few minutes before I did and we had a wonderful dinner.
>
> She followed me when we left to head home as she wasn't very familiar
> with the route. I had only driven the route once before, but I tend to
> learn roads better. Unfortunately when we left the roadhouse the rain
> was falling quite heavily - heavily that it wasn't particularly easy to
> see where we were going.
>
> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by this
> drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was in
> the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so terrifying,
> but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.
>
> I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.

You were scared because your lady was not at your side and you couldn't keep
her safe because you felt unsafe. I'm glad you guys had a night out and
made it home ok.

Jofirey
September 13th 08, 06:14 AM
"Daniel Mahoney" > wrote in message
...
> Here in central Iowa we're getting heavy rain, but nothing like what
> the
> folks in the Houston area are getting. Things are actually really
> mild
> here. But...
>
> Nancy was on the way home from work tonight and got delayed by a
> huge
> traffic accident. We had plans to go out to dinner when she got
> home,
> but since she had to get off the freeway and take side roads home we
> arranged to meet at a little roadhouse in Baxter that does great
> steaks.
> She got their a few minutes before I did and we had a wonderful
> dinner.
>
> She followed me when we left to head home as she wasn't very
> familiar
> with the route. I had only driven the route once before, but I tend
> to
> learn roads better. Unfortunately when we left the roadhouse the
> rain
> was falling quite heavily - heavily that it wasn't particularly easy
> to
> see where we were going.
>
> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help
> much.
> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams
> on
> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield.
> Nancy
> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back
> to
> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by
> this
> drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was
> in
> the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so
> terrifying,
> but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.
>
> I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.

I suspect you felt an extra tension because Nancy was
following/depending on you.

I still consider an early morning drive from here to San Francisco
about 20 years ago to be the scariest of my life.

The fog was so heavy that for about forty miles I was driving by the
cats eyes (fog reflectors). So bad that it would have been more
dangerous to stop than to keep on going. I have never been so tense
in my life.

Kind of a drive along the dotted line deal.

Jo

September 13th 08, 07:33 AM
Daniel Mahoney > wrote:

[snip]

> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by this
> drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was in
> the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so terrifying,
> but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.

I think driving in fog is really scary. You can't see anything, and as you
said, the high beams just make it worse. And you can't pull over because
someone whose visibility is just as impaired as yours might ram into you
from behind. You just have to keep going, clenching the steering wheel the
whole way, and hope you get home soon.

How come Nancy got off at a different exit?

--
Joyce ^..^

(To email me, remove the X's from my user name.)

September 13th 08, 07:34 AM
Jofirey > wrote:

> I still consider an early morning drive from here to San Francisco
> about 20 years ago to be the scariest of my life.

> The fog was so heavy that for about forty miles I was driving by the
> cats eyes (fog reflectors). So bad that it would have been more
> dangerous to stop than to keep on going. I have never been so tense
> in my life.

Was this a tule fog? I've never driven in one, and hope I never have to!
The fog in SF pales in comparison - literally.

--
Joyce ^..^

(To email me, remove the X's from my user name.)

jmcquown[_2_]
September 13th 08, 06:38 PM
Daniel Mahoney wrote:
> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by
> this drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I
> was in the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so
> terrifying, but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here
> tonight.
>
> I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.


I was driving home from work one day when there came a downpour that was
unlike anything I'd ever experienced. It was west TN so we're not talking
hurricane. And, FYI, not tornadic activity, either. It's a two lane road
with ditches on either side. The posted speed limit was 40MPH but I was
probably creeping along at 15; I couldn't see anything.

There was no place to pull off to the side and wait it out, although I
surely wanted to. I couldn't see a foot in front of me no matter how dim or
bright my lights were nor how fast or slow the windshield wipers. I DID see
some idiot with his brights on come up behind me. He tailgated me for what
felt like a mile (it wasn't). I'm surprised he didn't just ram my car to
make me go faster. I have no idea why this idiot couldn't figure out I
couldn't see. Maybe he had super powers and could see when no one else
could.

He finally blew past me, narrowly missed an oncoming car, I might add. He
wound up in a ditch. This was back before I had a cell phone but I did
phone the county sheriff's office when I got home. Of course, by the time I
got home it was only sprinkling.

Jill

Magic Mood Jeep
September 13th 08, 07:32 PM
jmcquown wrote:
> Daniel Mahoney wrote:
>> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
>> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
>> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
>> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
>> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
>> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by
>> this drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I
>> was in the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so
>> terrifying, but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here
>> tonight.
>>
>> I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.
>
>
> I was driving home from work one day when there came a downpour that was
> unlike anything I'd ever experienced. It was west TN so we're not
> talking hurricane. And, FYI, not tornadic activity, either. It's a two
> lane road with ditches on either side. The posted speed limit was 40MPH
> but I was probably creeping along at 15; I couldn't see anything.

I HATE that type of rain!
>
> There was no place to pull off to the side and wait it out, although I
> surely wanted to. I couldn't see a foot in front of me no matter how
> dim or bright my lights were nor how fast or slow the windshield
> wipers. I DID see some idiot with his brights on come up behind me. He
> tailgated me for what felt like a mile (it wasn't). I'm surprised he
> didn't just ram my car to make me go faster. I have no idea why this
> idiot couldn't figure out I couldn't see. Maybe he had super powers and
> could see when no one else could.

One word for these types: Fidjit*

>
> He finally blew past me, narrowly missed an oncoming car, I might add.
> He wound up in a ditch. This was back before I had a cell phone but I
> did phone the county sheriff's office when I got home. Of course, by
> the time I got home it was only sprinkling.
>

I would have pulled over, rolled down my window (rain or not) and
pointed at him and laughed! And I would have done it in a place where
he would have no choice but see me do it!

> Jill

I am glad you made it! And Dan (who originated this thread), too!
--
* Fidjit: slang/contraction of [email protected]%$ing idiot
--
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her wipe out Bunny's world domination.
--
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lefthanded-pathetic-paranoid-psychotic-sarcastic-wiseass-ditzy
former-blonde in Bloomington! (And proud of it, too)
email me at nalee1964 (at) comcast (dot) net
http://community.webshots.com/user/mgcmdjeep

Cheryl[_4_]
September 13th 08, 08:10 PM
"Jofirey" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> I still consider an early morning drive from here to San Francisco about
> 20 years ago to be the scariest of my life.
>
> The fog was so heavy that for about forty miles I was driving by the cats
> eyes (fog reflectors). So bad that it would have been more dangerous to
> stop than to keep on going. I have never been so tense in my life.
>
> Kind of a drive along the dotted line deal.

Driving in fog is scary! I had a similar drive one time, driving with
co-workers from DC area to Pittsburg area in January one year. We had a
very cold snap and the temps were below zero (F). It was snowing and
sleeting (how can it be sleeting in temps that low???) and we were driving
through the mountains. It was my turn to drive and the windshield wiper
fluid was frozen and the road spray was making it impossible to see, and the
windshield wipers made it worse because the slush from the road froze on
contact with the windshield. The first time I figured that out, I was
driving completely BLIND and I was afraid to stop, couldn't see the side of
the road to pull over, so I had to stick my head out the window to try to
navigate to a safe place to stop.

Jofirey
September 13th 08, 09:34 PM
> wrote in message
...
> Jofirey > wrote:
>
> > I still consider an early morning drive from here to San Francisco
> > about 20 years ago to be the scariest of my life.
>
> > The fog was so heavy that for about forty miles I was driving by
> > the
> > cats eyes (fog reflectors). So bad that it would have been more
> > dangerous to stop than to keep on going. I have never been so
> > tense
> > in my life.
>
> Was this a tule fog? I've never driven in one, and hope I never have
> to!
> The fog in SF pales in comparison - literally.
>

Yes. Very strange and thick fog we get here in the valley. I've even
driven in one where it was only about five feet deep. You could see
the sky and the stars but not the road.

It can move in a LOT faster than any other fog I've ever seen. Its
like it comes up out of the ground.

Jo

Jo

Kyla =^. . ^=
September 14th 08, 07:51 PM
>
> "Daniel Mahoney"
>> Here in central Iowa we're getting heavy rain, but nothing like what the
>> folks in the Houston area are getting. Things are actually really mild
>> here. But...
>>
>> Nancy was on the way home from work tonight and got delayed by a huge
>> traffic accident. We had plans to go out to dinner when she got home,
>> but since she had to get off the freeway and take side roads home we
>> arranged to meet at a little roadhouse in Baxter that does great steaks.
>> She got their a few minutes before I did and we had a wonderful dinner.
>>
>> She followed me when we left to head home as she wasn't very familiar
>> with the route. I had only driven the route once before, but I tend to
>> learn roads better. Unfortunately when we left the roadhouse the rain
>> was falling quite heavily - heavily that it wasn't particularly easy to
>> see where we were going.
>>
>> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
>> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
>> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
>> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
>> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
>> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by this
>> drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was in
>> the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so terrifying,
>> but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.

Dan, that was indeed scary. Thank God you're safe.
((((HUG))))
Kyla
>>

John F. Eldredge
September 15th 08, 03:08 AM
On Fri, 12 Sep 2008 22:07:31 -0500, Daniel Mahoney wrote:

> Here in central Iowa we're getting heavy rain, but nothing like what the
> folks in the Houston area are getting. Things are actually really mild
> here. But...
>
> Nancy was on the way home from work tonight and got delayed by a huge
> traffic accident. We had plans to go out to dinner when she got home,
> but since she had to get off the freeway and take side roads home we
> arranged to meet at a little roadhouse in Baxter that does great steaks.
> She got their a few minutes before I did and we had a wonderful dinner.
>
> She followed me when we left to head home as she wasn't very familiar
> with the route. I had only driven the route once before, but I tend to
> learn roads better. Unfortunately when we left the roadhouse the rain
> was falling quite heavily - heavily that it wasn't particularly easy to
> see where we were going.
>
> I turned on my high beams whenever possible, but it didn't help much.
> With low beams on it was hard to see the fog lines. With high beams on
> it looked like someone had turned a fore hose on the windshield. Nancy
> stayed generally 100 yards or so behind me until me got almost back to
> Newton, then she got off onto an other highway. Even before we got
> separated, though, it occurred to me that I was more frightened by this
> drive home than by any other drive I have ever done, even when I was in
> the truck. I can't tell you exactly why this drive was so terrifying,
> but I was never so glad to be home as when I get here tonight.
>
> I can't imagine what it would be like driving in the Galveston area.

A couple of years ago, I went on a church retreat to a park 80 miles or
so away. The weather was extremely stormy, and, on the way, I started
hearing tornado reports for the area where I was driving. It was after
dark, and the rain was so intense that I could only see thirty feet (10
meters) in front of the car, and had to slow down to a crawl. I started
wondering if a tornado was going to come along without my being able to
see it. I would have had to abandon the car and try to find a ditch that
wasn't flooded to the brim with rainwater. Fortunately, I got to my
destination OK, and didn't encounter any tornadoes.

--
John F. Eldredge --
PGP key available from http://pgp.mit.edu
"Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better
than not to think at all." -- Hypatia of Alexandria

Dan M
September 15th 08, 02:46 PM
> A couple of years ago, I went on a church retreat to a park 80 miles or
> so away. The weather was extremely stormy, and, on the way, I started
> hearing tornado reports for the area where I was driving. It was after
> dark, and the rain was so intense that I could only see thirty feet (10
> meters) in front of the car, and had to slow down to a crawl. I started
> wondering if a tornado was going to come along without my being able to
> see it. I would have had to abandon the car and try to find a ditch
> that wasn't flooded to the brim with rainwater. Fortunately, I got to
> my destination OK, and didn't encounter any tornadoes.

Yeah, I did a couple of drives like that in the truck. It's not a godo
feeling, wondering if a tornado might be nearby but you can't see it
because it's too dark.

That was part of the problem Friday night. We were driving from Baxter to
Newton. Baxter is a tiny little farming town, and the two highways we had
to take to get home were little two-lane county roads. The only buildings
on the road were farms, so no street lights and no light from the
buildings. I was driving as slow as I dared and Nancy was driving as fast
as she dared. It appears that she is effectively night-blind in adverse
weather. We got to an intersection a couple miles outside of town and
Nancy followed the fog line on the right side of the road - right onto
another highway. She ended up driving 20 miles out of her way and getting
lost, while I was backtracking looking for her and panicking.

The bottom line is that we need to avoid having Nancy drive after dark in
adverse weather. That experience was more than scary enough for both of
us.

Adrian[_2_]
September 15th 08, 02:53 PM
Dan M wrote:
<snip>
> The bottom line is that we need to avoid having Nancy drive after
> dark in adverse weather. That experience was more than scary enough
> for both of us.

The important thing is you're both safe.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy, Bagheera & Shadow)
Cats leave pawprints on your heart
http://community.webshots.com/user/clowderuk