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John_S03_Peterson
September 24th 08, 12:31 AM
A word of advice to all pet owners out there.

If your pet is sick and requires more than simple vaccinations or special
food, do NOT go to a vet who refuses to tell you over the phone if he
generally can do such and such a procedure or operation.

Some vets play the "consult game" telling you that they cannot tell you if
they do such and such until they see your animal. Often you wind up paying a
consult fee only to be told "we cannot or will not do that here". This is
not simply a question of examining the animal, since the vet SHOULD be able
to tell you what procedures he/she can generally do. If they cannot, they
are not being honest and open with you and you should not patronize such a
veterinarian.

Many of these veterinarians advertise they are full or complete service
veterinarians when they are NOT.
Many can only do or only want to do simple stuff like vaccinations, special
foods, neutering, etc. These are fundamentally dishonest practitioners, in
my opinion.

Sharon Too
September 24th 08, 01:34 AM
> If your pet is sick and requires more than simple vaccinations or special
> food, do NOT go to a vet who refuses to tell you over the phone if he
> generally can do such and such a procedure or operation.

If a pet is sick and the owner calls the vet or the office to inquire about
the illness or injury, it would be unethical to diagnose over the phone. Nor
can a vet prescribe medication without at least an exam, maybe even
diagnostic tools. That would cost him or her their license.

We don't even have a 'consultation' fee. We talk and talk and talk to
clients over the phone and do as much as we can for them in this way, but
the bottom line is we cannot diagnose or treat over the phone, except for
the occassional follow-up where a course of treatment is changed around.

Your statement above makes it sound like there are vets who won't say
whether or not they perform a certain procedure (like an ACL or FHO etc). If
someone were to ask our doctors a point blank question, (ie: Do you
surgically fix fractures with plates?"), they would tell them, "no, we refer
those to a specialist." But most people don't. They simply let us know there
is a problem. The doctor can't possibly know the exact extent of the
illness/injury just by speaking with an owner thus they can't know whether
or not they have the capability to correct or treat a problem without first
examining the patient. I don't know of ANY vet who wrangles a client into
the office without the patient, charge a consult fee just to let them know
they only do spays and neuters.

Sounds like you're trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill.

Spot[_2_]
September 24th 08, 02:38 AM
The consult fee as you call it is an office call. You go to the doctors and
pay an office call regardless of if the doctor can treat you and has to send
you elsewhere. Why should the vets office be any different. I would much
rather have my vet tell me she doesn't feel comfortable doing a procedure
she's not used to doing and send me somewhere else to someone who can.

Celeste


"John_S03_Peterson" > wrote in message
...
>A word of advice to all pet owners out there.
>
> If your pet is sick and requires more than simple vaccinations or special
> food, do NOT go to a vet who refuses to tell you over the phone if he
> generally can do such and such a procedure or operation.
>
> Some vets play the "consult game" telling you that they cannot tell you if
> they do such and such until they see your animal. Often you wind up paying
> a consult fee only to be told "we cannot or will not do that here". This
> is not simply a question of examining the animal, since the vet SHOULD be
> able to tell you what procedures he/she can generally do. If they cannot,
> they are not being honest and open with you and you should not patronize
> such a veterinarian.
>
> Many of these veterinarians advertise they are full or complete service
> veterinarians when they are NOT.
> Many can only do or only want to do simple stuff like vaccinations,
> special foods, neutering, etc. These are fundamentally dishonest
> practitioners, in my opinion.
>

cshenk
September 24th 08, 03:51 AM
"Sharon Too" wrote

> If a pet is sick and the owner calls the vet or the office to inquire
> about the illness or injury, it would be unethical to diagnose over the
> phone. Nor can a vet prescribe medication without at least an exam, maybe
> even diagnostic tools. That would cost him or her their license.

Correct. Basic stuff you can ask, such as 'my cat is .... do they need a
visit' (having the first furball in 2 months, no, relax, Happens again and
cat looks distressed, bring him in, also if any other syptoms happen')

Hi, my cat's leg fell off after being attacked by a dog (yes dear, bring him
in right away and if our surgery cant handle it, we have places to get him
to).

> We don't even have a 'consultation' fee. We talk and talk and talk to
> clients over the phone and do as much as we can for them in this way, but
> the bottom line is we cannot diagnose or treat over the phone, except for
> the occassional follow-up where a course of treatment is changed around.

Yup. Thats fair. I have one like that. Cat with yeast infection problems
in one ear. Recurrant. We just call then go down to pick up her ear wash
stuff (we do this before we run out and it's same stuff as good for the
Dog's ears so we go though it a bit fast).

> Sounds like you're trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill.

Probably. Me, I trust my vet.

cshenk
September 24th 08, 04:01 AM
"Spot" wrote

> The consult fee as you call it is an office call. You go to the doctors
> and pay an office call regardless of if the doctor can treat you and has
> to send you elsewhere. Why should the vets office be any different. I
> would much rather have my vet tell me she doesn't feel comfortable doing a
> procedure she's not used to doing and send me somewhere else to someone
> who can.

Exactly. I paid out of pocket (vice free) to have Cash-pup (2YO mixed
beagle but mixed with Bull Mastiff they think) neutered when the heart
specialist was there. SPCA was 49$. Amazingly insurance broght his down to
just 249$ and worth every penny. He has heart damage and some odd to track
sporadic beats due to (apparenly) the heartworms when he was found
abandoned.

Dog was turned down 4 times before we were finally able to get him well
enough where the stress of 'sniffing the local ladies aroma' exceeeded the
danger of the procedure. Cash was neutered at age 2 and not even the SPCA
was willing to touch him the first 2 times he was turned down.

He came though just fine. A happy healthy 50lb (perfect weight per vet, if
off, it's under by maybe 1 lb for his mixed breed size). My vet may not be
able to do open heart surgery, but she has referrals if so. She's got a dab
hand at feeding and exercise for a heart damaged lover-boy.

Sharon Too
September 24th 08, 06:45 AM
> The OP was not asking for that.

Then the OP needs to learn to make logical statements.

> Sounds like you're trying to pick a fight, or you have a reading
> comprehension problem.

Blather. Put your pacifier back in.

BS_vets
September 24th 08, 10:47 PM
HAHAHAHHAHA ROTFLMAO.

"FULL SERVICE VETERINARIAN"

"COMPLETE VETERINARY SERVICES"

---

Do you do surgey xyz procedure: UHHH WE DON'T DO THAT (CAN'T DO IT) That
will be $60 please.

Do you do chemotherapy?: UHHH CAN'T ANSWER THAT UNLESS YOU COME IN LIKE
A DUMBASS AND PAY OUR $50 QUESTION FEE.

Are you a bunch of lieing, greedy, dishonest, incompetent,ignorant
knuckleheads. HEY YOU GUESSED, NO CONSULT FEE!





"John_S03_Peterson" > wrote in
:

> A word of advice to all pet owners out there.
>
> If your pet is sick and requires more than simple vaccinations or
> special food, do NOT go to a vet who refuses to tell you over the
> phone if he generally can do such and such a procedure or operation.
>
> Some vets play the "consult game" telling you that they cannot tell
> you if they do such and such until they see your animal. Often you
> wind up paying a consult fee only to be told "we cannot or will not do
> that here". This is not simply a question of examining the animal,
> since the vet SHOULD be able to tell you what procedures he/she can
> generally do. If they cannot, they are not being honest and open with
> you and you should not patronize such a veterinarian.
>
> Many of these veterinarians advertise they are full or complete
> service veterinarians when they are NOT.
> Many can only do or only want to do simple stuff like vaccinations,
> special foods, neutering, etc. These are fundamentally dishonest
> practitioners, in my opinion.
>
>
>

cshenk
September 25th 08, 03:17 AM
"BS_vets" wrote

Obviously a troll. (More below for you sane folks)

> HAHAHAHHAHA ROTFLMAO.
>
> "FULL SERVICE VETERINARIAN"
>
> "COMPLETE VETERINARY SERVICES"
>
> ---
>
> Do you do surgey xyz procedure: UHHH WE DON'T DO THAT (CAN'T DO IT) That
> will be $60 please.
>
> Do you do chemotherapy?: UHHH CAN'T ANSWER THAT UNLESS YOU COME IN LIKE
> A DUMBASS AND PAY OUR $50 QUESTION FEE.
>
> Are you a bunch of lieing, greedy, dishonest, incompetent,ignorant
> knuckleheads. HEY YOU GUESSED, NO CONSULT FEE!

Sadly, it *does* cost money to run an operation that treats pets. Many of
us would like to ignore that they have to pay to get gear not all that far
off from what is used for ourselves or children (2foot types). We want a 5$
vet visit using 50,000$ or more gear 'for free'. If it was a human going to
a Doc without insurance, you know it's 200$ before tests. If your docs for
humans are cheaper, enjoy it.

Trolls will be ignored if bothering to respond.

Dale Atkin
September 25th 08, 04:12 AM
"John_S03_Peterson" > wrote in message
...
> A word of advice to all pet owners out there.
>
> If your pet is sick and requires more than simple vaccinations or special
> food, do NOT go to a vet who refuses to tell you over the phone if he
> generally can do such and such a procedure or operation.

Ya' know... I've never seen this happen. I've never heard of it happening
either (at least not the way you describe it). Can you give some details of
a case where you've seen this happen? Where you've called a vet and said 'do
you do procedure x', and have them tell you that you'll have to go elsewhere
when you're in the office. Note, this is entirely different than calling
with 'my dog is lame can you treat him?', which requires a diagnosis, time,
skills, possibly equipment and hence a charge.
Also, try to remember that it isn't uncommon to have a client call and say
'x' is wrong with my dog 'can you treat him', only to find out that 'x' is
not wrong with the dog, its in fact 'y'. 'x' might be something you can
treat for, but 'y' isn't. 'x' might be very, very, uncommon, but 'y' very
common (so you're confident that its not *in fact* 'x', but more likely 'y',
but the client thinks is 'x', so you might in theory elect to see a patient
where the client thinks 'x' is wrong, even though you can't treat for 'x'. I
recall a case the other day when a client came in and said 'my dog's leg is
broken' when in fact he'd pulled a muscle (although we could have treated
both cases)

>
> Some vets play the "consult game" telling you that they cannot tell you if
> they do such and such until they see your animal. Often you wind up paying
> a consult fee only to be told "we cannot or will not do that here". This
> is not simply a question of examining the animal, since the vet SHOULD be
> able to tell you what procedures he/she can generally do.

Yes. They should, and in my experience do, but bear in mind, with something
like fracture repair, there are varying degrees of competence required to
repair a fracture. It may require looking at the animal to determine if the
fracture can be repaired using the techniques they have available (if not,
they may be forced to refer you).

> If they cannot, they are not being honest and open with you and you should
> not patronize such a veterinarian.

The number one thing in choosing a vet, in my opinion is trust. You need to
find someone you can understand, and trust. If not, you're wasting your
money, and their time (as you won't likely be compliant with their
directions anyways).

>
> Many of these veterinarians advertise they are full or complete service
> veterinarians when they are NOT.

I'd be leery of any vet practice that says they can do everything, unless
they have a rather large staff, and rather large facility. There are so many
specialties, that no one person can be an expert in all of them.

Dale

John_S03_Peterson
September 26th 08, 01:46 AM
"Dale Atkin" > wrote in
news:[email protected]:

>
>
> "John_S03_Peterson" > wrote in message
> ...
>> A word of advice to all pet owners out there.
>>
>> If your pet is sick and requires more than simple vaccinations or
>> special food, do NOT go to a vet who refuses to tell you over the
>> phone if he generally can do such and such a procedure or operation.
>
> Ya' know... I've never seen this happen. I've never heard of it
> happening either (at least not the way you describe it). Can you give
> some details of a case where you've seen this happen? Where you've
> called a vet and said 'do you do procedure x', and have them tell you
> that you'll have to go elsewhere when you're in the office. Note, this
> is entirely different than calling with 'my dog is lame can you treat
> him?', which requires a diagnosis, time, skills, possibly equipment
> and hence a charge. Also, try to remember that it isn't uncommon to
> have a client call and say 'x' is wrong with my dog 'can you treat
> him', only to find out that 'x' is not wrong with the dog, its in fact
> 'y'. 'x' might be something you can treat for, but 'y' isn't. 'x'
> might be very, very, uncommon, but 'y' very common (so you're
> confident that its not *in fact* 'x', but more likely 'y', but the
> client thinks is 'x', so you might in theory elect to see a patient
> where the client thinks 'x' is wrong, even though you can't treat for
> 'x'. I recall a case the other day when a client came in and said 'my
> dog's leg is broken' when in fact he'd pulled a muscle (although we
> could have treated both cases)

Please read the original post carefully. This has nothing to do with
making a diagnosis, but a simple inquiry as to whether or not a clinic
can or does do a certain procedure (not ear cropping declawing or other
bad procedures) What they are saying is we won't comment until you pay a
office call fee. Unprofessional an dishonest, no way around it. I have
even had them tell me yes, we may do it and then get to their office and
say, no way we can do that procedure, you need a specialist.

>
>>
>> Some vets play the "consult game" telling you that they cannot tell
>> you if they do such and such until they see your animal. Often you
>> wind up paying a consult fee only to be told "we cannot or will not
>> do that here". This is not simply a question of examining the animal,
>> since the vet SHOULD be able to tell you what procedures he/she can
>> generally do.
>
> Yes. They should, and in my experience do, but bear in mind, with
> something like fracture repair, there are varying degrees of
> competence required to repair a fracture. It may require looking at
> the animal to determine if the fracture can be repaired using the
> techniques they have available (if not, they may be forced to refer
> you).

Why do vets and those in the profession automatically assume you are
ignorant of medical procedures? Having worked in orthopedics, I already
know all about this.


>
>> If they cannot, they are not being honest and open with you and you
>> should not patronize such a veterinarian.
>
> The number one thing in choosing a vet, in my opinion is trust. You
> need to find someone you can understand, and trust. If not, you're
> wasting your money, and their time (as you won't likely be compliant
> with their directions anyways).
>

How many vets have you been to as a client? Maybe it's different in
Canada, but here in Arizona, there are many, many incompetent and
unprofessional veterinary services. The State Licensing Board was found
to be negligent in their oversight of AZ veterinarians by a State
Inspector General here.


>>
>> Many of these veterinarians advertise they are full or complete
>> service veterinarians when they are NOT.
>
> I'd be leery of any vet practice that says they can do everything,
> unless they have a rather large staff, and rather large facility.
> There are so many specialties, that no one person can be an expert in
> all of them.

It's very funny. The small, do nothing offices, frequently advertise
"complete" or "full-service" and are anything but. Don't they screen out
liars in veterinary schools?

>
> Dale
>
>
>
>
>

Dale Atkin
September 26th 08, 02:35 AM
"John_S03_Peterson" > wrote in message
...
> Please read the original post carefully. This has nothing to do with
> making a diagnosis, but a simple inquiry as to whether or not a clinic
> can or does do a certain procedure (not ear cropping declawing or other
> bad procedures) What they are saying is we won't comment until you pay a
> office call fee. Unprofessional an dishonest, no way around it. I have
> even had them tell me yes, we may do it and then get to their office and
> say, no way we can do that procedure, you need a specialist.
>

If this is the case, then I agree. There is no reason not to be able to
comment, on whether or not a particular procedure is preformed at a given
clinic. I've yet to see a client explicitly ask 'do you do procedure x'. And
I've certainly never heard this as a complaint around here from people in
the dog park etc. For my own experience, I have asked, at specialist
centers, and they are more than happy to answer over the phone.


> Why do vets and those in the profession automatically assume you are
> ignorant of medical procedures? Having worked in orthopedics, I already
> know all about this.


Then you should be aware that more people *ARE* ignorant of medical
procedures. I doubt 5% of the population has even witnessed an operation
live, let alone know what is involved. When you get someone who when picking
up their cat after a spay operation asks 'how long until she can have
kittens', and you know darned well she's already been explained what was
involved... well you start to have some doubts about the general population.

> How many vets have you been to as a client?

Vets? or clinics? I've been to 4 different clinics, and seen 9 different
vets as a client (this was prior to me taking any really serious steps
towards vet school). There have been vets I didn't get along with for what
ever reason, and vets I really respected (and still do), and vets I didn't
like as client, but now that I know more about them, know they are
technically very good, but just for what ever reason put me off as a
client). I saw one clinic for a short while before I moved, didn't really
have any problems with them, but also wasn't overly committed to them (I saw
three different vets there). When I moved, I received a really strong
endorsement of a different clinic, that was closer to where I lived, so I
moved there. He sold his practice shortly after I started going to him, and
I saw the new owner a couple of times, and I wasn't really impressed with
the transition from one owner to the other (clients weren't actually
informed of the transition, I thought initially he was a locum, not the new
owner.) The third clinic I saw when I was volunteering for the animal
shelter. Once I adopted my second dog, I decided to continue see that clinic
for him, as he had a history with them. I was impressed with them, so I
moved my business to them. I saw all three vets there as a client at various
times before I started volunteering there. The other vet I've seen was an
after hours emergency call to a clinic I don't go to. Was very impressed by
him, as I was not a client of his, but he saw me anyways, spent a lot of
time with me, and didn't charge me through the nose.
None of the vets I saw did I consider 'unethical'.

> Maybe it's different in
> Canada, but here in Arizona, there are many, many incompetent and
> unprofessional veterinary services. The State Licensing Board was found
> to be negligent in their oversight of AZ veterinarians by a State
> Inspector General here.

Interesting, and good to know. It underscores some of the speeches we've had
about the privilege of being a self governed profession, and how if we don't
behave in a manner to instill public trust that this privilege can be
revoked.


>> I'd be leery of any vet practice that says they can do everything,
>> unless they have a rather large staff, and rather large facility.
>> There are so many specialties, that no one person can be an expert in
>> all of them.
>
> It's very funny. The small, do nothing offices, frequently advertise
> "complete" or "full-service" and are anything but. Don't they screen out
> liars in veterinary schools?
>

I've never seen a clinic around here claim to do everything (even the
specialist centers). I also haven't seen much of what I would call
'advertising' either for veterinarians (perhaps its governed differently
here, I don't know... I know some professional organizations around here
actually ban their members from advertising, don't know about
veterinarians.) Most of the advertizing is restricted to clinic fronts, and
sponsoring of certain events/organizations (like the local shelter, or the
poop scooping day etc.).

Are these ads 'shop front'? Yellow Pages? TV? Radio? Just curious.

Dale

Sharon Too
September 26th 08, 02:53 AM
> Please read the original post carefully. This has nothing to do with
> making a diagnosis, but a simple inquiry as to whether or not a clinic
> can or does do a certain procedure (not ear cropping declawing or other
> bad procedures) What they are saying is we won't comment until you pay a
> office call fee.

We don't do this, nor do the vets we know. So I was wondering about others
and at a meeting yesterday, I asked several practice owners and managers. Of
the 9 others sitting at my table, 9 pair of eyes opened wide and 9 people
said they did not do this. That's 0% of my sampling who don't do this.

Perhaps your experience is the exception and not the norm. In any case, the
profession shouldn't be assumed to do this as a whole.

cshenk
September 26th 08, 01:07 PM
"Dale Atkin" wrote

Dale, the most impressive vet I ever had, was in San Antonio TX. I found
this little kitten by the roadside when jogging. Oh, I thought 'near full
grown' but read on.

This little bundle was about 4-5 lbs (guessing here, it was 1983 and dont
think I was ever told the weight then). Eyes closed, leg dangling, looked
like broken ribs and bleeding from one ear. No one wanted to even see him
except to put him to sleep. Must have called 20 places. Finally one was
willing to at least see if it was possible. One of those high end folks who
normally dealt only with fancy blue ribbon award winning pedigree show dogs
and cats (and yes, the real award winning show animals with enough money to
have real leather seats and sofas in his waiting room for pets). I was real
scared of the price but it was the only place willng to at least look at
him.

So I went and the Vet took one look at me and my tearful face as I presented
this little thing in a cardboard box laying on my softest pillow with a
blanket and a brand new baby bottle I'd gotten at the local Kroger and
filled with water and set there trying to see if he could manage that, and
he said 'he'd try'. No charge if it didnt work and how much could I afford?
We worked out a plan for 750$ with payments. (1/2 my monthly takehome pay
just then and no savings but he wanted to be sure I was serious as he later
told me he'd have reduced it even further if my income was less). I am
quite sure it cost him 3,000$ or more in meds etc but didnt know that then.

8 hours later I came home with a cat, a bunch of cat milk he had provided,
droppers to feed him with, and a cat I had named Bobby who was in a body
cast and had to be fed hourly. Work gave me leave for a week then allowed
me to take him with me (became the shop mascot fast and folks would fight on
who's turn it was to feed him). Slowly as he grew and casts got replaced or
were reduced, he grew to be a lovely happy healthy fellow.

Bobby lived to be 17 though I had to give him up when he was 3. I found him
a perfect home before being transferred to Hawaii and got letters and
pictures every Xmas. He was very happy at the farm on 50 acres with the
fellow who loved large dogs and the wife who had violent allergies to dog
hair.

Oh the size and eyes? Little me had never had a cat. I was unaware of why
his name was so funny to the vet til he was 6 months old. See. Bobby was
part Bobcat. Pretty common to the area and the 'closed eyes' wasnt because
of the injury, but because his eyes were not yet open.

John_S03_Peterson
September 28th 08, 01:29 AM
"Dale Atkin" > wrote in
news:n%[email protected]:

>
>
> "John_S03_Peterson" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Please read the original post carefully. This has nothing to do with
>> making a diagnosis, but a simple inquiry as to whether or not a
>> clinic can or does do a certain procedure (not ear cropping declawing
>> or other bad procedures) What they are saying is we won't comment
>> until you pay a office call fee. Unprofessional an dishonest, no way
>> around it. I have even had them tell me yes, we may do it and then
>> get to their office and say, no way we can do that procedure, you
>> need a specialist.
>>
>
> If this is the case, then I agree. There is no reason not to be able
> to comment, on whether or not a particular procedure is preformed at a
> given clinic. I've yet to see a client explicitly ask 'do you do
> procedure x'. And I've certainly never heard this as a complaint
> around here from people in the dog park etc. For my own experience, I
> have asked, at specialist centers, and they are more than happy to
> answer over the phone.


Not here, they either do not know or will not answer or answer
incorrectly. Someone different seems to answer the phone each time at
most clinics here. The whole impression is a lack of professionalism and
competence. Not all clinics, but most of them. Many of these guys might
be good veterinarians, but they do not know how to manage a clinic,
imnsho.


>
>
>> Why do vets and those in the profession automatically assume you are
>> ignorant of medical procedures? Having worked in orthopedics, I
>> already know all about this.
>
>
> Then you should be aware that more people *ARE* ignorant of medical
> procedures. I doubt 5% of the population has even witnessed an
> operation live, let alone know what is involved. When you get someone
> who when picking up their cat after a spay operation asks 'how long
> until she can have kittens', and you know darned well she's already
> been explained what was involved... well you start to have some doubts
> about the general population.


Never assume anything. First mark of an open-minded and good clinician.
I know what you're saying is true in the main.


>
>> How many vets have you been to as a client?
>
> Vets? or clinics? I've been to 4 different clinics,


<snip for brevity>

>
>> Maybe it's different in
>> Canada, but here in Arizona, there are many, many incompetent and
>> unprofessional veterinary services. The State Licensing Board was
>> found to be negligent in their oversight of AZ veterinarians by a
>> State Inspector General here.
>
> Interesting, and good to know. It underscores some of the speeches
> we've had about the privilege of being a self governed profession, and
> how if we don't behave in a manner to instill public trust that this
> privilege can be revoked.


This WILL change, it is only a matter of time. When consumers start to
wise up and we get a better government, there will be more oversight and
regulation of the veterinary profession. It is long overdue. It is being
held up by corruption in the form of lobbiests infleunce over our
governments, both state and federal. Same holds true for the AMA.


>
>
>>> I'd be leery of any vet practice that says they can do everything,
>>> unless they have a rather large staff, and rather large facility.
>>> There are so many specialties, that no one person can be an expert
>>> in all of them.
>>
>> It's very funny. The small, do nothing offices, frequently advertise
>> "complete" or "full-service" and are anything but. Don't they screen
>> out liars in veterinary schools?
>>
>

<snip>

>
> Are these ads 'shop front'? Yellow Pages? TV? Radio? Just curious.

Yellow pages. Usually what they brag about they are the exact opposite
of what they claim. The louder they claim it, the more the opposite is
true, in my experience.


>
> Dale
>
>

John_S03_Peterson
September 28th 08, 01:35 AM
I know there are good vets out there. I just have been suprised myself
as to not meeting any where I live now. I think it has to do with the
general over all poor quality of services in Arizona, due to the
transient nature of the population here and virtually no government
oversight.


"Sharon Too" > wrote in
irkandfredoniatelephone
:

>> Please read the original post carefully. This has nothing to do with
>> making a diagnosis, but a simple inquiry as to whether or not a
>> clinic can or does do a certain procedure (not ear cropping declawing
>> or other bad procedures) What they are saying is we won't comment
>> until you pay a office call fee.
>
> We don't do this, nor do the vets we know. So I was wondering about
> others and at a meeting yesterday, I asked several practice owners and
> managers. Of the 9 others sitting at my table, 9 pair of eyes opened
> wide and 9 people said they did not do this. That's 0% of my sampling
> who don't do this.
>
> Perhaps your experience is the exception and not the norm. In any
> case, the profession shouldn't be assumed to do this as a whole.
>
>
>