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stevej111
September 28th 08, 02:15 AM
I have a cat that is fearful of strangers.
He has cancer and will need to be put to sleep soon.

I read that some vets place an IV for this. I think
this would prolong the process and be stressful to
both the cat and me. Will a simple injection be tramatic
to the cat? He is not real weak yet, but the cancer is
inoperable and his quality of life is poor.

I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
easy for the cat?

Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanesia?

Dan Espen
September 28th 08, 03:42 AM
stevej111 > writes:

> I have a cat that is fearful of strangers.
> He has cancer and will need to be put to sleep soon.
>
> I read that some vets place an IV for this. I think
> this would prolong the process and be stressful to
> both the cat and me. Will a simple injection be tramatic
> to the cat? He is not real weak yet, but the cancer is
> inoperable and his quality of life is poor.

One of our cats had to be put down that way.
We were not in the room when the IV was put in
but were there when the injection was given.

The cat was calm through the part we saw.
She never seemed to know what happened.
No change of expression or anything.

Dale Atkin
September 28th 08, 05:41 AM
> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
> easy for the cat?
>
> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanasia

I've never heard of Carbon Monoxide being used this way, so I googled it,
and found this:
http://www.freewebs.com/ncche/medicaleffectsofco.htm

"The same report states that animals exposed to CO during euthanasia suffer
convulsions and muscular spasms"

also

" Most major humane organizations advocate a move toward more humane
euthanasia for sheltered animals, citing the dangers and health effects of
carbon monoxide... It is unacceptable to use CO for animals who are old,
sick injured, pregnant, or under four months of age. "

Really doesn't sound like a good way to go.

With regards to euthanasia via injection, I've been on hand for many
euthanasias, both canine and feline (I'm a first year vet student, and I've
worked in a vet clinic for the past 3 years). I can tell you that they seem
to be almost uniformly without incident, and the animals pass on with a
minimal amount of distress. Most of them don't mind the needle, which is
really all they feel.

On occasion, if difficulties are expected, we will sedate the animal prior
to administering the injection to make sure everything goes smoothly.
Generally with cats, this is with the use of a gas anesthetic (isofluorine),
you might want to inquire about this possibility if you're concerned about
the needle (particularly if they have had difficulty drawing blood from your
cat in the recent past), that way if anything goes awry, your cat won't be
aware of it.

Dale

AZ Nomad[_2_]
September 28th 08, 05:30 PM
On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 04:41:25 GMT, Dale Atkin > wrote:
>> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
>> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
>> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
>> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
>> easy for the cat?
>>
>> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanasia

>I've never heard of Carbon Monoxide being used this way, so I googled it,
>and found this:
>http://www.freewebs.com/ncche/medicaleffectsofco.htm

I've heard of using CO2. Kitty in cooler with dry ice.

I would never do it. An injection of something to stop the heart seems like
the way to go.

Gandalf
September 28th 08, 06:29 PM
On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 11:30:06 -0500, AZ Nomad
> wrote:

>On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 04:41:25 GMT, Dale Atkin > wrote:
>>> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
>>> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
>>> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
>>> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
>>> easy for the cat?
>>>
>>> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanasia
>
>>I've never heard of Carbon Monoxide being used this way, so I googled it,
>>and found this:
>>http://www.freewebs.com/ncche/medicaleffectsofco.htm
>
>I've heard of using CO2. Kitty in cooler with dry ice.
>
>I would never do it. An injection of something to stop the heart seems like
>the way to go.

Using CO2 is a very, VERY bad way to 'euthanize' any animal.

Your body, and your cat's body, recognizes an excess of CO2: it burns
your throat and lungs when you breathe it, and unlike carbon monoxide,
the cat would KNOW it was dying, in a most horrible way: by suffocating.
It would be very painful, and very cruel. It it would not happen nearly
as quickly as you might think.

Euthanizing a cat is best done by a vet; using methods and drugs they
are, unfortunately, good at.

The cat really does 'go to sleep', from an overdose of one or more
sedatives; one is always a barbiturate.

Some vets will come to your home, so cats that are scared of going to
the vet don't have to go through that, when they are old, sick and/or in
pain.

If your vet doesn't do this, start calling vet clinics and find one who
does.

There is no 'easy' way to euthanize a beloved pet.

But don't do it yourself, using some method that is far slower, and more
painful, than the method used by a vet.

Really. Think about it.

Sharon Too
September 28th 08, 07:02 PM
> Using CO2 is a very, VERY bad way to 'euthanize' any animal.

It's not euthanasia ("painless death"). CO2 is murder.

T[_4_]
September 28th 08, 07:48 PM
In article >,
says...
> I have a cat that is fearful of strangers.
> He has cancer and will need to be put to sleep soon.
>
> I read that some vets place an IV for this. I think
> this would prolong the process and be stressful to
> both the cat and me. Will a simple injection be tramatic
> to the cat? He is not real weak yet, but the cancer is
> inoperable and his quality of life is poor.
>
> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
> easy for the cat?
>
> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanesia?
>

The intravenous method involves a few steps. One of the first is
tranquilization of the cat. Then they use another IV to basically do a
potassium overload that shuts down the heart.

I hate putting down cats but I think the IV method isn't very painful
for them.

Dale Atkin
September 28th 08, 08:17 PM
> The intravenous method involves a few steps. One of the first is
> tranquilization of the cat. Then they use another IV to basically do a
> potassium overload that shuts down the heart.

There are different protocols with different areas and different vets. What
I've seen (mostly) is an IV barbiturate (brand name euthanyl) overdose that
seems to be fairly common around here. I've heard (indirectly) about some
vets using a potassium overdose, but never seen it.

Dale

AZ Nomad[_2_]
September 28th 08, 08:17 PM
On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 17:29:02 GMT, Gandalf > wrote:
>On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 11:30:06 -0500, AZ Nomad
> wrote:

>>On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 04:41:25 GMT, Dale Atkin > wrote:
>>>> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
>>>> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
>>>> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
>>>> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
>>>> easy for the cat?
>>>>
>>>> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanasia
>>
>>>I've never heard of Carbon Monoxide being used this way, so I googled it,
>>>and found this:
>>>http://www.freewebs.com/ncche/medicaleffectsofco.htm
>>
>>I've heard of using CO2. Kitty in cooler with dry ice.
>>
>>I would never do it. An injection of something to stop the heart seems like
>>the way to go.
>
>Using CO2 is a very, VERY bad way to 'euthanize' any animal.

>Your body, and your cat's body, recognizes an excess of CO2: it burns
>your throat and lungs when you breathe it, and unlike carbon monoxide,
>the cat would KNOW it was dying, in a most horrible way: by suffocating.
>It would be very painful, and very cruel. It it would not happen nearly
>as quickly as you might think.

>Euthanizing a cat is best done by a vet; using methods and drugs they
>are, unfortunately, good at.

>The cat really does 'go to sleep', from an overdose of one or more
>sedatives; one is always a barbiturate.

>Some vets will come to your home, so cats that are scared of going to
>the vet don't have to go through that, when they are old, sick and/or in
>pain.

>If your vet doesn't do this, start calling vet clinics and find one who
>does.

>There is no 'easy' way to euthanize a beloved pet.

>But don't do it yourself, using some method that is far slower, and more
>painful, than the method used by a vet.

>Really. Think about it.

No argument here. Considering that over the life of a pet one is going to
spend at least ten thousand times as much just for food, it makes zero sense
to perform home euthenization.

Dale Atkin
September 28th 08, 08:33 PM
> Euthanizing a cat is best done by a vet; using methods and drugs they
> are, unfortunately, good at.

Just for clarification... I don't think anyone in this thread was
contemplating doing it themselves.

> The cat really does 'go to sleep', from an overdose of one or more
> sedatives; one is always a barbiturate.

I'm not so sure about one 'always' being a barbiturate, although that does
seem to be the most common around here. As per another post, I've heard of
potassium being used to euthanize animals, but I'm unfamiliar with the
details, other than it stops the heart, presumably by mucking with the
potential for the formation of action potentials, but I'm just guessing....
I don't imagine this alone would be a good idea, as it would seem to be
similar to having a heart attack and dying, hence the sedative first.

> Some vets will come to your home, so cats that are scared of going to
> the vet don't have to go through that, when they are old, sick and/or in
> pain.
>
> If your vet doesn't do this, start calling vet clinics and find one who
> does.

Just a comment about this. Make sure that whatever vet you call to do the
job is in fact set up to do 'in home' euthanasia. Ask how/if they sedate the
cat prior to the final injection etc. I know we don't generally like to
euthanize cats in home, as we like to have the anesthetic machine on hand in
case of difficulties (and our anesthetic machine isn't overly portable). In
ideal situations, one could simple give a a single injection, and they'd go
peacefully, so any vet *could* do it at home, but they aren't necessarily
set up for the 'what if' scenarios (also understand if your vet doesn't do
euthanasia at home, there may be a good reason why they don't)

Dale

CatNipped[_2_]
September 28th 08, 09:25 PM
"Gandalf" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 11:30:06 -0500, AZ Nomad
> > wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 04:41:25 GMT, Dale Atkin > wrote:
>>>> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
>>>> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
>>>> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
>>>> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
>>>> easy for the cat?
>>>>
>>>> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanasia
>>
>>>I've never heard of Carbon Monoxide being used this way, so I googled it,
>>>and found this:
>>>http://www.freewebs.com/ncche/medicaleffectsofco.htm
>>
>>I've heard of using CO2. Kitty in cooler with dry ice.
>>
>>I would never do it. An injection of something to stop the heart seems
>>like
>>the way to go.
>
> Using CO2 is a very, VERY bad way to 'euthanize' any animal.
>
> Your body, and your cat's body, recognizes an excess of CO2: it burns
> your throat and lungs when you breathe it, and unlike carbon monoxide,
> the cat would KNOW it was dying, in a most horrible way: by suffocating.
> It would be very painful, and very cruel. It it would not happen nearly
> as quickly as you might think.
>
> Euthanizing a cat is best done by a vet; using methods and drugs they
> are, unfortunately, good at.
>
> The cat really does 'go to sleep', from an overdose of one or more
> sedatives; one is always a barbiturate.
>
> Some vets will come to your home, so cats that are scared of going to
> the vet don't have to go through that, when they are old, sick and/or in
> pain.
>
> If your vet doesn't do this, start calling vet clinics and find one who
> does.
>
> There is no 'easy' way to euthanize a beloved pet.
>
> But don't do it yourself, using some method that is far slower, and more
> painful, than the method used by a vet.
>
> Really. Think about it.

When we had Bandit put down I asked that the vet administer a sedative first
so that she was in a very sound sleep before they gave her the euthanasia
drug. The vet came out to my house to do it - he only charged $80, and it
was well worth that little bit extra, for all the years she gave me love and
companionship, that she could feel safe in her own home and on my bed.

Hugs,

CatNipped

ben
September 29th 08, 09:25 AM
On Sep 27, 9:15*pm, stevej111 > wrote:
> I have a cat that is fearful of strangers.
> He has cancer and will need to be put to sleep soon.
>
> I read that some vets place an IV for this. I think
> this would prolong the process and be stressful to
> both the cat and me. Will a simple injection be tramatic
> to the cat? He is not real weak yet, but the cancer is
> inoperable and his quality of life is poor.
>
> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
> easy for the cat?
>
> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanesia?

I think the most humane method would be by bullet to the head. Now, I
know you couldn't do this yourself but an expert would have the gun
perfectly positioned in the correct part of the brain to kill
instantly. The cat wouldn't even hear the shot it would be so fast.

Joe Average
September 30th 08, 01:41 AM
Hey Ben,

Sounds like good advice, but I think you should try it on your own head
first, then come back and tell us how it worked out for you.

"ben" > wrote in message
...
On Sep 27, 9:15 pm, stevej111 > wrote:
> I have a cat that is fearful of strangers.
> He has cancer and will need to be put to sleep soon.
>
> I read that some vets place an IV for this. I think
> this would prolong the process and be stressful to
> both the cat and me. Will a simple injection be tramatic
> to the cat? He is not real weak yet, but the cancer is
> inoperable and his quality of life is poor.
>
> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
> easy for the cat?
>
> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanesia?

I think the most humane method would be by bullet to the head. Now, I
know you couldn't do this yourself but an expert would have the gun
perfectly positioned in the correct part of the brain to kill
instantly. The cat wouldn't even hear the shot it would be so fast.


** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Matthew[_3_]
September 30th 08, 02:07 AM
"stevej111" > wrote in message
...
> ben > wrote in
> :
>
>>
>
> I recently skimmed a paper by the AVMA (i think it was) that listed
> carbon monoxide as a humane method. Not the car variety, but probably
> pure CM. I think CM is probably painless, that is why so many die from
> this without knowing there is anything wrong before the succumb. They
> used to put animals in a decompression chamber, some shelters did, that
> was really bad news. As with so many things, the choice often revolves
> around saving money.
>
> As for gunshot, don't know too many marksmen who are experts in feline
> neuroanatomy, but I am sure a bullet to the head would be very quick and
> very messy.
>
> NO ONE knows for SURE. How can you tell if death brings pain, without
> experiencing it yourself? You cannot.
>
> Since I see alot of complaints about veterinarians, I am concerned I
> will be unlucky and draw Dr. Nogood and my cat will suffer.


Steve no offense call your a vet many will come to your home. they can
give him a sedative relax him he goes to sleep peacefully as a few other
suggested.

There is no other way to do it safely and peacefully. If you are
entertaining other thoughts go some where else and troll. We see a dozen
of you a week in the cat groups

Matthew[_3_]
September 30th 08, 02:27 AM
"stevej111" > wrote in message
...
> "Matthew" > wrote in news:48e17bb9$0$8510
> :
>
>>
>
> You really ought to go somewhere else, because you're not too bright.
> You're like that guy on Seinfeld who calls everyone a antisemite, only in
> you're case it's "a troll"

Just proved my point.

Dale Atkin
September 30th 08, 03:22 AM
"stevej111" > wrote in message
...
> ben > wrote in
> :
>
>>
>
> I recently skimmed a paper by the AVMA (i think it was) that listed
> carbon monoxide as a humane method. Not the car variety, but probably
> pure CM. I think CM is probably painless, that is why so many die from
> this without knowing there is anything wrong before the succumb.

I think we're (possibly) confusing here with 'not knowing anything is wrong
before its too late' with a peaceful death. If you read through the pages I
posted, there seems to be some definite evidence that CO poisoning is not a
painless way to go.

"animals exposed to CO during euthanasia suffer convulsions and muscular
spasms" from 2000 Report of the AVMA Panel on Euthanasia, JAVMA, Vol. 218,
No. 5, March 2001 as cited on
http://www.freewebs.com/ncche/medicaleffectsofco.htm

Directly from the newest version of the report
(http://www.avma.org/resources/euthanasia.pdf):
"Any gas that is inhaled must reach a certain concentration
in the alveoli before it can be effective; therefore, euthanasia with any of
these agents takes some time."

"Electroencephalographic recordings revealed 20 to 25 seconds of abnormal
cortical function prior to loss of consciousness. It was during this period
that the dogs became agitated and vocalized. It is not known whether animals
experience distress; however, humans in this phase reportedly are not
distressed"

the second quote seems to cast doubt on the interpretation put on it by the
freewebs website, *but* the following is also said:

"Carbon monoxide used for individual animal or mass euthanasia is acceptable
for dogs, cats, and other small mammals, provided that commercially
compressed CO is used and the following precautions are taken: (1) personnel
using CO must be instructed thoroughly in its use and must understand its
hazards and limitations; (2) the CO chamber must be of the highest quality
construction and should allow for separation of individual animals; (3) the
CO source and chamber must be located in a well-ventilated environment,
preferably out of doors; (4) the chamber must be well lit and have view
ports that allow personnel direct observation of animals; (5) the CO flow
rate should be adequate to rapidly achieve a uniform CO concentration
of at least 6% after animals are placed in the chamber, although some
species (eg, neonatal pigs) are less likely to become agitated with a
gradual rise in CO concentration;98 and (6) if the chamber is inside a room,
CO monitors must be placed in the room to warn personnel of hazardous
concentrations. It is essential that CO use be in compliance with state and
federal occupational health and safety regulations."

So you don't want to do this with a gas mask on the animal...too much risk
involved for the people. Not how I'd want my animal to go.

> NO ONE knows for SURE. How can you tell if death brings pain, without
> experiencing it yourself? You cannot.

True, but we can make some guesses.

1. People brought back from near death who have been similarly exposed
2. Symptoms typically displayed (ECG, blood chemistry, vocalizations,
movement etc).

Re: Gunshot
"Recommendations-When other methods cannot be used, an accurately delivered
gunshot is a conditionally
acceptable method of euthanasia.114,122-125 When an animal can be
appropriately restrained, the penetrating captive bolt is preferred to a
gunshot. Prior to shooting, animals accustomed to the presence of humans
should be treated in a calm and reassuring manner to minimize anxiety. In
the case of wild animals,
gunshots should be delivered with the least amount of prior human contact
necessary. Gunshot should not be used for routine euthanasia of animals in
animal control situations, such as municipal pounds or shelters."


>
> Since I see alot of complaints about veterinarians, I am concerned I
> will be unlucky and draw Dr. Nogood and my cat will suffer.
>

Talk to the vet before, and if you aren't comfortable with him or her, don't
go through with it with that vet. Ask about sedation prior to administration
of the lethal injection, make sure you are comfortable with their response.
Remember as well you are more likely to hear complaints than praise.

Gotta run study now,

Dale

Sharon Too
September 30th 08, 06:02 AM
> Re: Gunshot
> "Recommendations-When other methods cannot be used, an accurately
> delivered gunshot is a conditionally <snipped for brevity>

Since a target has to be completely still in order for the shooter to get a
precise shot, I can't imagine how this could be safely done with cats, much
less dogs, unless they are so debilitated they can't move even their heads.
In this day and age, I can't see why anyone would think this is the best
choice for humanely ending life.

Kitty
September 30th 08, 07:28 PM
"stevej111" > wrote in message
...
>I have a cat that is fearful of strangers.
> He has cancer and will need to be put to sleep soon.
>
> I read that some vets place an IV for this. I think
> this would prolong the process and be stressful to
> both the cat and me. Will a simple injection be tramatic
> to the cat? He is not real weak yet, but the cancer is
> inoperable and his quality of life is poor.
>
> I will probably call a mobile vet to come to my place
> and do it, but what can I do to minmize the stress to
> this loveable little creature? Has anyone been in this
> situation that can give me some tips on how to make this
> easy for the cat?
>
> Can carbon monoxide be used as a gentle euthanesia?

Please do not use the CO, The kitty deserves a decent passing. I had mine
euthanized using a sedative then the heart stopping drug. It was the
"easiest" for the cat, but no matter how my dear Lucy left this world, it
was painful for me. But please do the right thing and have your cat have the
most peaceful passing you can.

Kitty

Dale Atkin
October 2nd 08, 02:40 AM
"Sharon Too" > wrote in message
irkandfredoniatelephone...
>> Re: Gunshot
>> "Recommendations-When other methods cannot be used, an accurately
>> delivered gunshot is a conditionally <snipped for brevity>
>
> Since a target has to be completely still in order for the shooter to get
> a precise shot, I can't imagine how this could be safely done with cats,
> much less dogs, unless they are so debilitated they can't move even their
> heads. In this day and age, I can't see why anyone would think this is the
> best choice for humanely ending life.

It depends somewhat on the situation. I wouldn't think this would be a good
idea for companion animals, but perhaps for a moose threatening to run in to
traffic in a major city (any kind of tranq. being likely to spook the
animal, and cause unpredictable results), or similar situations. A bullet to
the head might be the most humane method possible.

Dale