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Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
October 5th 08, 04:35 PM
Hello all,

Long time lurker here. I have posted a few times over the years, about
my two cats, Bonnie and Sylvester. I lost Bonnie to acute renal failure
last year. She was 18. Sylvester is still around, he turned 18 last
month. He is a miracle cat. He was diagnosed with hypertrophic
cardiomyopathy about 12 years ago and was given 1-3 years to live. Hah!

Then, about 7 years ago, he was diagnosed with diabetes and was on
insulin twice a day. As of last January, he no longer needs insulin.

He also has (or had) inflammatory bowel disease. He had to eat the same
dry food all his life (Hill's Sensitive Stomach was the only food he
could keep down)...until recently. I decided to try him on some canned
food to cut down on carbs - he's never been able to tolerate any canned
food without very messy consequences - and he did just fine. So, I've
been expanding his diet and so far so good.

So go figure. The cat is ancient, and decides to get healthy on me. :)

Anyway, in about two months, I am moving back to California (we're in
Florida now). We moved here from CA two years ago, and we flew both
cats on the plane with us. We gave them just a teensy bit of
Acepromazine, and they were in la-la land for most of the 5-hour flight,
they woke up about an hour before landing.

Well, this time, there are no direct flights, meaning the ordeal will be
much longer with a layover, and Sylvester is two years older now. I am
very worried about moving him at his age, and because of his heart
condition.

It's been suggested that driving him might be better - I will be driving
my dog cross country because I don't want her to be in the cargo hold of
the plane. She is old too - 14 years. So I could drive them together.

Seems like driving Sylvester (about a 4-day trip) would be more
stressful than getting him there by plane in one day. Cats don't like
cars the same way dogs do.

If I do fly him...should I sedate him again? I've since read that
sedating them can be more dangerous than not. Plus, he's got the heart
issue. He'll wail and cry if I don't sedate him though. The last hour
of the flight here two years ago, he started to wake up and boy, he made
himself heard. I don't know if we can deal with two long flights like
that. We might get booted off the plane! :)

I know moving him so far at his age is a risk...I guess I'm asking which
is the kindest, safest way to do it? Plane or car? Drugs or no drugs?

Thanks for any suggestions!

Jennifer and Sylvester

cybercat
October 5th 08, 06:09 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
> It's been suggested that driving him might be better - I will be driving
> my dog cross country because I don't want her to be in the cargo hold of
> the plane. She is old too - 14 years. So I could drive them together.

Will your cat have to be in the cargo hold?

Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
October 5th 08, 06:27 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>
>>It's been suggested that driving him might be better - I will be driving
>>my dog cross country because I don't want her to be in the cargo hold of
>>the plane. She is old too - 14 years. So I could drive them together.
>
> Will your cat have to be in the cargo hold?
>

NO WAY! I should have clarified. He would be in a carrier under the
seat in front of me. That's how we brought him and Bonnie (RIP) out
here two years ago. I wouldn't put any animal in a cargo hold, or let
them be tossed around by baggage-handlers. I know most animals are just
fine being flown that way, but I just can't do it.

The bummer is that Sylvester is a big cat. He really needs a large-size
Sherpa carrier, but the biggest the airlines will allow in the cabin are
the medium. He can fit in a medium, but he cannot stand up. He has to
stay hunkered down. I kept unzipping the top to let him move around a
little when no-one was looking when we brought them out here. But it
will be a longer flight(s)this time - an all-day affair, and he will
have to remain in that small carrier (I'll unzip the top when possible). :(

Jennifer

cybercat
October 5th 08, 06:42 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>
> NO WAY! I should have clarified. He would be in a carrier under the seat
> in front of me. That's how we brought him and Bonnie (RIP) out here two
> years ago. I wouldn't put any animal in a cargo hold, or let them be
> tossed around by baggage-handlers. I know most animals are just fine
> being flown that way, but I just can't do it.

Good for you!

>
> The bummer is that Sylvester is a big cat. He really needs a large-size
> Sherpa carrier, but the biggest the airlines will allow in the cabin are
> the medium. He can fit in a medium, but he cannot stand up. He has to
> stay hunkered down. I kept unzipping the top to let him move around a
> little when no-one was looking when we brought them out here. But it
> will be a longer flight(s)this time - an all-day affair, and he will have
> to remain in that small carrier (I'll unzip the top when possible). :(
>

Here's a question for you--when you drive your dog, will there be another
human with you? My instincts are against flying for some reason, even though
I drove a very vocal cat from Houston, Texas to Raleigh NC once, and you are
right about them not liking cars. If there is another person with you, they
might be able to calm and comfort, maybe hold your cat, I was thinking. I
would ask my vet given the age of your cat. If there is a safe drug, knocked
out and on the plane, not in cargo, must be the best alternative.

Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
October 5th 08, 07:10 PM
cybercat wrote:

> "Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>
>>NO WAY! I should have clarified. He would be in a carrier under the seat
>>in front of me. That's how we brought him and Bonnie (RIP) out here two
>>years ago. I wouldn't put any animal in a cargo hold, or let them be
>>tossed around by baggage-handlers. I know most animals are just fine
>>being flown that way, but I just can't do it.
>
>
> Good for you!
>
>
>>The bummer is that Sylvester is a big cat. He really needs a large-size
>>Sherpa carrier, but the biggest the airlines will allow in the cabin are
>>the medium. He can fit in a medium, but he cannot stand up. He has to
>>stay hunkered down. I kept unzipping the top to let him move around a
>>little when no-one was looking when we brought them out here. But it
>>will be a longer flight(s)this time - an all-day affair, and he will have
>>to remain in that small carrier (I'll unzip the top when possible). :(
>>
>
>
> Here's a question for you--when you drive your dog, will there be another
> human with you? My instincts are against flying for some reason, even though
> I drove a very vocal cat from Houston, Texas to Raleigh NC once, and you are
> right about them not liking cars. If there is another person with you, they
> might be able to calm and comfort, maybe hold your cat, I was thinking. I
> would ask my vet given the age of your cat. If there is a safe drug, knocked
> out and on the plane, not in cargo, must be the best alternative.
>
>
My mom will be making the drive with me. I do plan on asking the vet
what he thinks, given all the issues - age, health, etc. I still think
that dragging out the trip for four days might be more stressful, even
if he can ride in a lap. He'll still wonder what the heck is going on.
Plus, how do you travel over several days with a cat? Have a litter
box in the car, or what? Then he'd have to adapt to a new motel room
every night, etc. Seems like it would take quite a toll on the old guy.

I'll see what the vet says about safe drugs to use if I fly him.

AZ Nomad[_2_]
October 5th 08, 07:17 PM
On Sun, 05 Oct 2008 11:35:56 -0400, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet > wrote:
>Hello all,

>Long time lurker here. I have posted a few times over the years, about
>my two cats, Bonnie and Sylvester. I lost Bonnie to acute renal failure
>last year. She was 18. Sylvester is still around, he turned 18 last
>month. He is a miracle cat. He was diagnosed with hypertrophic
>cardiomyopathy about 12 years ago and was given 1-3 years to live. Hah!

>Then, about 7 years ago, he was diagnosed with diabetes and was on
>insulin twice a day. As of last January, he no longer needs insulin.

>He also has (or had) inflammatory bowel disease. He had to eat the same
>dry food all his life (Hill's Sensitive Stomach was the only food he
>could keep down)...until recently. I decided to try him on some canned
>food to cut down on carbs - he's never been able to tolerate any canned
>food without very messy consequences - and he did just fine. So, I've
>been expanding his diet and so far so good.

>So go figure. The cat is ancient, and decides to get healthy on me. :)


drive and don't sedate. When you stop for gas, make it a longer stop and
park and let the kitties move about.

I have no problem driving with kitty on my lap on long trips and don't give a FF
what any of the newsgroup-nannies have to say about it. I've been doing it for
25 years and don't have such mediocre driving skills that it is the slightest
problem. If kitty goes anywhere near my feet I hiss and kitty retreats.

Of course, some kitties are the kind that will freak out. That kind of cat
would have to stay in a carrier.

Spot[_2_]
October 5th 08, 07:27 PM
I have traveled all over the place with the cat in the car. I would stop
every 4 or 5 hours give him some food and let them out to use the litter box
in the car. Keep the windows up and the AC running if it's hot.

One time I was traveling and the AC quit, and then there was an accident and
no way around it till it was cleared. I back tracked went to a gas station
bought 2 bags of ice. Dumped the food from the cooler out put the ice in
the cooler covered it with a towel and Meowzer rode the rest of the way home
sleeping on top of the ice in the ice chest. It was just way to hot not to
do something to keep him cooled off.

Celeste


"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote in message
g.com...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>> "Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>>
>>>NO WAY! I should have clarified. He would be in a carrier under the
>>>seat in front of me. That's how we brought him and Bonnie (RIP) out here
>>>two years ago. I wouldn't put any animal in a cargo hold, or let them
>>>be tossed around by baggage-handlers. I know most animals are just fine
>>>being flown that way, but I just can't do it.
>>
>>
>> Good for you!
>>
>>
>>>The bummer is that Sylvester is a big cat. He really needs a large-size
>>>Sherpa carrier, but the biggest the airlines will allow in the cabin are
>>>the medium. He can fit in a medium, but he cannot stand up. He has to
>>>stay hunkered down. I kept unzipping the top to let him move around a
>>>little when no-one was looking when we brought them out here. But it
>>>will be a longer flight(s)this time - an all-day affair, and he will have
>>>to remain in that small carrier (I'll unzip the top when possible). :(
>>>
>>
>>
>> Here's a question for you--when you drive your dog, will there be another
>> human with you? My instincts are against flying for some reason, even
>> though I drove a very vocal cat from Houston, Texas to Raleigh NC once,
>> and you are right about them not liking cars. If there is another person
>> with you, they might be able to calm and comfort, maybe hold your cat, I
>> was thinking. I would ask my vet given the age of your cat. If there is a
>> safe drug, knocked out and on the plane, not in cargo, must be the best
>> alternative.
> My mom will be making the drive with me. I do plan on asking the vet what
> he thinks, given all the issues - age, health, etc. I still think that
> dragging out the trip for four days might be more stressful, even if he
> can ride in a lap. He'll still wonder what the heck is going on. Plus,
> how do you travel over several days with a cat? Have a litter box in the
> car, or what? Then he'd have to adapt to a new motel room every night,
> etc. Seems like it would take quite a toll on the old guy.
>
> I'll see what the vet says about safe drugs to use if I fly him.

cybercat
October 5th 08, 08:32 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>>
>>
> My mom will be making the drive with me. I do plan on asking the vet what
> he thinks, given all the issues - age, health, etc. I still think that
> dragging out the trip for four days might be more stressful, even if he
> can ride in a lap. He'll still wonder what the heck is going on. Plus,
> how do you travel over several days with a cat? Have a litter box in the
> car, or what? Then he'd have to adapt to a new motel room every night,
> etc. Seems like it would take quite a toll on the old guy.

It will. My cat was not old, and she was really a mess. She would not eat or
eliminate the entire three days we were on the road. (I broke it up, stayed
two nights in a hotel.) Strangely, as soon as she got to the hotel, she was
fine. It's the noise of the car she hated.

>
> I'll see what the vet says about safe drugs to use if I fly him.

I think flying with kitty sedated is the best choice. Driving will be hard
on you, too. Just worrying, dealing with the sounds and other signs of
distress your cat is making. Others who say they "always take the cat in the
car on long trips" are not thinking about an 18-year-old cat who has never
been on a long car trip. Cats can die from stress, just like the rest of us.
I'd keep it short and simple, on the plane, with something to make kitty
sleepy if possible so he will not want to stand up, since he will be in a
small carrier. Easier on you, easier on the cat, if your vet agrees. Do let
us know what he says.

Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
October 5th 08, 10:38 PM
cybercat wrote:

> "Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>
>>>
>>My mom will be making the drive with me. I do plan on asking the vet what
>>he thinks, given all the issues - age, health, etc. I still think that
>>dragging out the trip for four days might be more stressful, even if he
>>can ride in a lap. He'll still wonder what the heck is going on. Plus,
>>how do you travel over several days with a cat? Have a litter box in the
>>car, or what? Then he'd have to adapt to a new motel room every night,
>>etc. Seems like it would take quite a toll on the old guy.
>
>
> It will. My cat was not old, and she was really a mess. She would not eat or
> eliminate the entire three days we were on the road. (I broke it up, stayed
> two nights in a hotel.) Strangely, as soon as she got to the hotel, she was
> fine. It's the noise of the car she hated.
>
>
>>I'll see what the vet says about safe drugs to use if I fly him.
>
>
> I think flying with kitty sedated is the best choice. Driving will be hard
> on you, too. Just worrying, dealing with the sounds and other signs of
> distress your cat is making. Others who say they "always take the cat in the
> car on long trips" are not thinking about an 18-year-old cat who has never
> been on a long car trip. Cats can die from stress, just like the rest of us.
> I'd keep it short and simple, on the plane, with something to make kitty
> sleepy if possible so he will not want to stand up, since he will be in a
> small carrier. Easier on you, easier on the cat, if your vet agrees. Do let
> us know what he says.

Thanks Cybercat. My line of thinking is the same. I came on here
asking because everybody I've told about my plans, says I should drive
him. They've all said, "He'll be with YOU....so he'll be okay". I
don't think my presence in the car will help all that much when you add
up all the other stress factors...4 days, in the car (which he hates),
with the dog, strange motel rooms each night, etc. He has a bad
heart...I don't know if it could handle four days of stress.

Will report back after I talk to the vet.

Jennifer
>
>

jmc
October 6th 08, 10:30 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet exclaimed (10/5/2008
11:35 AM):
> Hello all,
>
> Long time lurker here. I have posted a few times over the years, about
> my two cats, Bonnie and Sylvester. I lost Bonnie to acute renal failure
> last year. She was 18. Sylvester is still around, he turned 18 last
> month. He is a miracle cat. He was diagnosed with hypertrophic
> cardiomyopathy about 12 years ago and was given 1-3 years to live. Hah!
>
> Then, about 7 years ago, he was diagnosed with diabetes and was on
> insulin twice a day. As of last January, he no longer needs insulin.
>
> He also has (or had) inflammatory bowel disease. He had to eat the same
> dry food all his life (Hill's Sensitive Stomach was the only food he
> could keep down)...until recently. I decided to try him on some canned
> food to cut down on carbs - he's never been able to tolerate any canned
> food without very messy consequences - and he did just fine. So, I've
> been expanding his diet and so far so good.
>
> So go figure. The cat is ancient, and decides to get healthy on me. :)
>
> Anyway, in about two months, I am moving back to California (we're in
> Florida now). We moved here from CA two years ago, and we flew both
> cats on the plane with us. We gave them just a teensy bit of
> Acepromazine, and they were in la-la land for most of the 5-hour flight,
> they woke up about an hour before landing.
>
> Well, this time, there are no direct flights, meaning the ordeal will be
> much longer with a layover, and Sylvester is two years older now. I am
> very worried about moving him at his age, and because of his heart
> condition.
>
> It's been suggested that driving him might be better - I will be driving
> my dog cross country because I don't want her to be in the cargo hold of
> the plane. She is old too - 14 years. So I could drive them together.
>
> Seems like driving Sylvester (about a 4-day trip) would be more
> stressful than getting him there by plane in one day. Cats don't like
> cars the same way dogs do.
>
> If I do fly him...should I sedate him again? I've since read that
> sedating them can be more dangerous than not. Plus, he's got the heart
> issue. He'll wail and cry if I don't sedate him though. The last hour
> of the flight here two years ago, he started to wake up and boy, he made
> himself heard. I don't know if we can deal with two long flights like
> that. We might get booted off the plane! :)
>
> I know moving him so far at his age is a risk...I guess I'm asking which
> is the kindest, safest way to do it? Plane or car? Drugs or no drugs?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions!
>
> Jennifer and Sylvester

I'd drive. From your other posts, and his age, I think it'd be highly
uncomfortable or painful for him to be crammed in a little Sherpa for
all that time. At least if you're driving, he can be more comfortable
in a bigger crate.

Just make sure you pick pet-friendly hotels. Personally, since Meep is
such a low-impact cat, I ignore the rules about keeping in her cage, if
the place has 'em. I think it's important after a day in the car that
she can move around.

Your local bookstore will have books that list pet-friendly hotels,
their rules, and any additional deposit.

Ask your doctor about clomicalm or amytryptyline (sp) for the trip.
It's not so much sedating as mellowing. Well, clomi didn't work for my
cat - sedated her so much she didn't move for two days, poor thing, but
amy worked great for her during our stressful move - we flew halfway
around the world, then drove cross country, and then moved into a
strange house - and she's been fine. Of course, she has done this
before, but Meep's 12 now so no spring chicken either.

Good luck!

jmc

cshenk
October 6th 08, 01:09 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" wrote
> cybercat wrote:

>>>My mom will be making the drive with me. I do plan on asking the vet
>>>what he thinks, given all the issues - age, health, etc. I still think
>>>that dragging out the trip for four days might be more stressful, even if
>>>he can ride in a lap. He'll still wonder what the heck is going on.
>>>Plus, how do you travel over several days with a cat? Have a litter box
>>>in the car, or what? Then he'd have to adapt to a new motel room every
>>>night, etc. Seems like it would take quite a toll on the old guy.

Kinda depends on the car size and the cat. I would not advise a loose cat
and/or a loose dog.

Now, if you have a big SUV sort of thing and can make a big separate carrier
for both of them, this might be safer than sedation? If you do decide to
drive with the cat and your mom, get a body harness and leash and have Mom
hold it. No, the cat will not 'like it' but will ignore it after a bit and
it's far safer for you all. A freaked out cat can and may crawl near your
feet which can cause you to chose to kill the cat who's under your break
pedal, or kill you all.

Please, no matter how well they normally get along, do not put them in the
same 'cage', especially on a long trip. If one gets spooked suddenly, both
could be badly hurt.

alanr
October 6th 08, 01:27 PM
Sound advice.

"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> Kinda depends on the car size and the cat. I would not advise a loose cat
> and/or a loose dog.
>
> Now, if you have a big SUV sort of thing and can make a big separate
> carrier for both of them, this might be safer than sedation? If you do
> decide to drive with the cat and your mom, get a body harness and leash
> and have Mom hold it. No, the cat will not 'like it' but will ignore it
> after a bit and it's far safer for you all. A freaked out cat can and may
> crawl near your feet which can cause you to chose to kill the cat who's
> under your break pedal, or kill you all.
>
> Please, no matter how well they normally get along, do not put them in the
> same 'cage', especially on a long trip. If one gets spooked suddenly,
> both could be badly hurt.
>
>

AZ Nomad[_2_]
October 6th 08, 02:58 PM
On Mon, 6 Oct 2008 08:09:00 -0400, cshenk > wrote:
>Now, if you have a big SUV sort of thing and can make a big separate carrier
>for both of them, this might be safer than sedation? If you do decide to
>drive with the cat and your mom, get a body harness and leash and have Mom
>hold it. No, the cat will not 'like it' but will ignore it after a bit and
>it's far safer for you all. A freaked out cat can and may crawl near your
>feet which can cause you to chose to kill the cat who's under your break
>pedal, or kill you all.

I've only tried sedation on a kitty once and it was a total disaster.
Instead of a cat freaking out for a little, I had a drunk cat freaking out
until the drug wore off.

cybercat
October 6th 08, 04:21 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
> Thanks Cybercat. My line of thinking is the same. I came on here asking
> because everybody I've told about my plans, says I should drive him.
> They've all said, "He'll be with YOU....so he'll be okay". I don't think
> my presence in the car will help all that much when you add up all the
> other stress factors...4 days, in the car (which he hates), with the dog,
> strange motel rooms each night, etc. He has a bad heart...I don't know if
> it could handle four days of stress.
>
> Will report back after I talk to the vet.
>

I think this is smart, your vet will almost certainly know best.

DWMeowMix
October 6th 08, 10:35 PM
On Oct 5, 9:35*am, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet >
wrote:

> I know moving him so far at his age is a risk...I guess I'm asking which
> is the kindest, safest way to do it? *Plane or car? *Drugs or no drugs?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions!
>
> Jennifer and Sylvester

Hi Jennifer and Sylverster...

Here's my take on it. Having traveled with a cat both by plane and
3.5 day car trip, I would never again take a cat on a plane again
unless you can take her/him with you as a carry on unsedated. I
sedated my kitty and she fought the sedation so when I got off the
plane 8 hours later (she was in cargo, this was many years ago when I
didn't have a choice - NEVER AGAIN!!!!), my beautiful, affectionate,
loving kitty was a VERY ****ed off, drugged, hissing, biting kitty.
After getting to my destination and let her out of the carrier she
didn't come out from under the bed for 2 solid weeks. I fed her there
and put a potty box close and there she stayed.

Driving is easier on the kitty. My tips?

1. Buy a $12 bottle of Feliway Spray. Spray the inside of the
carrier and in the car. This spray is basically a "happy cat" spray.
It releases pheramones into the air that helps settle the cat. It
wouldn't hurt to buy the Feliway diffuser too and plug that in at your
new home.
2. Find a large piece of material or large towel and cover the
carrier loosely. The biggest part of a cats stress is being able to
see the motion outside of the windows. Cover the carrier and they
will eventually settle down. Just make sure there's sufficient air
flow.
2. Leave her in the carrier until you get to the motel. Kitties have
a bad habit of escaping if loose. Plus it's for your own safety as
well as kitty's that he/she remain in the carrier. Kitty can get
under your feet around your face and just plain distract you from
driving. I had one left out one time and she crawled up on my
shoulder then around my face and we got into a wreck. You will also
lessen any chance of her escaping if you open the door to put a leash
on her/him.
3. Feed/Water her/him a SMALL amount after you get to the motel.
Provide litter. DO NOT feed/water in the morning before getting on
the road again. Unless you want a nasty smelly surprise in very close
confines....

DWMeowMix

DWMeowMix
October 6th 08, 10:45 PM
On Oct 6, 3:35*pm, DWMeowMix > wrote:
> On Oct 5, 9:35*am, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet >
> wrote:
>
> > I know moving him so far at his age is a risk...I guess I'm asking which
> > is the kindest, safest way to do it? *Plane or car? *Drugs or no drugs?
>
> > Thanks for any suggestions!
>
> > Jennifer and Sylvester
>
> Hi Jennifer and Sylverster...
>
> Here's my take on it. *Having traveled with a cat both by plane and
> 3.5 day car trip, I would never again take a cat on a plane again
> unless you can take her/him with you as a carry on unsedated. *I
> sedated my kitty and she fought the sedation so when I got off the
> plane 8 hours later (she was in cargo, this was many years ago when I
> didn't have a choice - NEVER AGAIN!!!!), my beautiful, affectionate,
> loving kitty was a VERY ****ed off, drugged, hissing, biting kitty.
> After getting to my destination and let her out of the carrier she
> didn't come out from under the bed for 2 solid weeks. *I fed her there
> and put a potty box close and there she stayed.
>
> Driving is easier on the kitty. *My tips?
>
> 1. *Buy a $12 bottle of Feliway Spray. *Spray the inside of the
> carrier and in the car. *This spray is basically a "happy cat" spray.
> It releases pheramones into the air that helps settle the cat. *It
> wouldn't hurt to buy the Feliway diffuser too and plug that in at your
> new home.
> 2. *Find a large piece of material or large towel and cover the
> carrier loosely. *The biggest part of a cats stress is being able to
> see the motion outside of the windows. *Cover the carrier and they
> will eventually settle down. *Just make sure there's sufficient air
> flow.
> 2. *Leave her in the carrier until you get to the motel. *Kitties have
> a bad habit of escaping if loose. *Plus it's for your own safety as
> well as kitty's that he/she remain in the carrier. *Kitty can get
> under your feet around your face and just plain distract you from
> driving. *I had one left out one time and she crawled up on my
> shoulder then around my face and we got into a wreck. *You will also
> lessen any chance of her escaping if you open the door to put a leash
> on her/him.
> 3. *Feed/Water her/him a SMALL amount after you get to the motel.
> Provide litter. *DO NOT feed/water in the morning before getting on
> the road again. *Unless you want a nasty smelly surprise in very close
> confines....
>
> DWMeowMix

Oh, BTW...buy yourself some Rescue Remedy at the health food store.
Rub some on kitty's ears (a couple of times a day if you can), put
some in her water. It will also help keep her calmer.

cshenk
October 7th 08, 12:50 PM
"AZ Nomad" wrote
cshenk wrote:

>>Now, if you have a big SUV sort of thing and can make a big separate
>>carrier
>>for both of them, this might be safer than sedation? If you do decide to

> I've only tried sedation on a kitty once and it was a total disaster.
> Instead of a cat freaking out for a little, I had a drunk cat freaking out
> until the drug wore off.

I've heard that one before. I've never tried to sedate a cat.

The one time I had tomake a significant move (San Diego to Norfolk) I had
them flown and picked up by the SIL (who delivered them right to a pet hotel
from the airport after a professional bath and pampering). It probably
wasnt the best for them, but I was driving in a Ford Escort with an 18 month
old daughter and packed to the gills in there. No room for suitable sized
carriers unless we dispensed with the winter clothes and we were making the
trek in FEB.

Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
October 9th 08, 05:26 PM
hopitus wrote:

> (snipped funny story about cat on airplane)

> Another story is what happened to us that night after
> the airport
> cancelled all outgoing flights because of the tornado. Flying would be
> indeed
> best option, in-cabin, for an old cat.


I want to say thanks to you, and to everybody else, for chiming in with
their experiences on moving their cats. I still plan on discussing the
situation with my vet and going with his recommendation. I will post an
update after I talk to him. This probably will not be for about another
month, as I will need a health certificate for Sylvester, and it cannot
be older than 30 days from the time of travel if I fly him. Since I
won't be making the move for about 2 more months, I plan on waiting
until a month before to take him in for a check up and his certificate,
and will have the discussion with the vet at that time.

Thanks again everyone. This has always been one of the most helpful
newsgroups.

Best to all,
Jennifer
Sylvester
& Bonnie (RIP)

cybercat
October 9th 08, 06:36 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote
>
> Thanks again everyone. This has always been one of the most helpful
> newsgroups.
>

Jennifer, Sylvester is lucky to have you. Let us know what you decide, and
also how it turns out! We have all had different experiences with traveling
with cats, so your input will be valuable. I am particularly interested in
what the vet says is best for an old cat with health problems, as my Boo is
in this situation.

October 10th 08, 08:36 PM
Well, this is a hard one - I think if he could be your carry on -
then he may be fine at your feet. You could give him a sedative if he
is with you....Also, you would want to give him as low of a dosage as
possible.
YOUR correct 4 days in the car will be hard, too.

I wish you two luck! It will be hard for him but the plane may be
better on him. Don't put him in cargo, he needs to be in the cabin as
carry on. Ok.
BEST wishes

Marie Peppers ( Dog and CAT food Expert / Allexperts.com
http://www.apluspetcare.com/untitled4.html