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PDX-Stan
October 17th 08, 08:30 AM
I've got 2 cats...one is just fine, she eats just right for her size.

2nd cat just got diagnosed with diabetes, insulin dependant.
He LOVES to eat the other's food, then his own.

Q: How do I keep him away from her food, so that she can eat her's
whenever.
Someday's I'm away for long hours.

Thanx,

MaryL
October 17th 08, 01:39 PM
"PDX-Stan" > wrote in message
...
> I've got 2 cats...one is just fine, she eats just right for her size.
>
> 2nd cat just got diagnosed with diabetes, insulin dependant.
> He LOVES to eat the other's food, then his own.
>
> Q: How do I keep him away from her food, so that she can eat her's
> whenever.
> Someday's I'm away for long hours.
>
> Thanx,
>

Best advice: Good-quality canned food (no dry food) would be better for
*both* cats. They should be fed twice a day, twelve hours apart or as close
to that as possible. That means that you would be home when they are fed
even though you said you are sometimes away for long hours. Food should not
be left out, so this will work well for both cats.

Second option (but not preferred): The only way I can think of to prevent
one cat from eating the "wrong" food if you leave food out when you are gone
is to keep the cats in separate rooms of the house. In my opinion, that
should be only an occasional option because the cats are probably companions
for each other. However, there is no way to "train" a cat to know to eat
only one type of food.

MaryL

Rene S.
October 17th 08, 02:56 PM
On Oct 17, 7:39*am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "PDX-Stan" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > I've got 2 cats...one is just fine, she eats just right for her size.
>
> > 2nd cat just got diagnosed with diabetes, insulin dependant.
> > He LOVES to eat the other's food, then his own.
>
> > Q: How do I keep him away from her food, so that she can eat her's
> > whenever.
> > Someday's I'm away for long hours.
>
> > Thanx,
>
> Best advice: *Good-quality canned food (no dry food) would be better for
> *both* cats. *They should be fed twice a day, twelve hours apart or as close
> to that as possible. *That means that you would be home when they are fed
> even though you said you are sometimes away for long hours. *Food should not
> be left out, so this will work well for both cats.

I agree completely. I have a cat who is a chowhound. Twice a day, when
I feed the cats, I shut him in a spare room for 15-20 minutes. The
other cats can eat in peace. It's become routine and he now heads
toward the room when I come with the food bowl.

The Nice Mean Man[_2_]
October 18th 08, 08:40 AM
On Oct 17, 3:30*am, PDX-Stan > wrote:
> I've got 2 cats...one is just fine, she eats just right for her size.
>
> 2nd cat just got diagnosed with diabetes, insulin dependant.
> He LOVES to eat the other's food, then his own.
>
> Q: How do I keep him away from her food, so that she can eat her's
> whenever.
> Someday's I'm away for long hours.
>
> Thanx,

The problem is, the other cat's food TASTE BETTER. That's because when
you've got a terminal illness, they give you **** food and tell you
that you can't have any fun because they want you to suffer. They want
to make the remaining days of your life a living hell. Is that the
case here?


The Nice Mean Man




"Let us bring jhad to America..."
http://www.careerbuilder.com/monk-e-mail/?mid=28275725

Phil P.
October 19th 08, 10:56 PM
"PDX-Stan" > wrote in message
...
> I've got 2 cats...one is just fine, she eats just right for her size.
>
> 2nd cat just got diagnosed with diabetes, insulin dependant.
> He LOVES to eat the other's food, then his own.
>
> Q: How do I keep him away from her food, so that she can eat her's
> whenever.
> Someday's I'm away for long hours.
>
> Thanx,

Don't make any changes in food and especially feeding times without speaking
to your vet *first*. Changes in food and/or feeding pattern will affect how
your cat metabolizes his insulin.

Your vet calculated your cat's insulin dose based on the food and feeding
pattern your cat was on at time he was tested. Switching to a low
carbohydrate diet will significantly reduce your cat's insulin requirement.
IOW, his present insulin dose could result in an insulin *overdose* and
*severe* hypoglycemia if his carbohydrate intake is significantly lower than
it was when his insulin dose was calculated.

Ask your vet to show you how to check your cat's blood glucose level at home
so you can check his blood glucose *before* giving him an insulin injection.
Also, ask your vet to make a chart that will tell you how much insulin your
cat will need with different blood glucose levels.

A low carbohydrate diet would be the best diet for all your cats. Its the
natural diet for all cats-- and you won't have to worry about your diabetic
cat eating your other cat's food. I've weaned several IDDM cats of insulin
completely by simply feeding them a low carbohydrate diet.

Check out this website. It has a lot of good information.

http://felinediabetes.com/

Best of luck,

Phil

Rene S.
October 21st 08, 04:27 PM
FYI, you should check out this web site: http://yourdiabeticcat.com/

and this book:
http://www.amazon.com/Your-Cat-Simple-Secrets-Stronger/dp/0312358024/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1224602857&sr=8-1