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cindys
November 5th 08, 09:38 PM
Hi, everyone! I haven't been around here in a while. The youngest of
my group, Tux, has been diagnosed with FORL (feline odontoclastic
resorptive lesions). I have never seen this topic discussed on this
group (although it may have been and I didn't see it).

To summarize: It's a dental issue for which the cause is unknown but
some of the theories are that it may be caused by a virus or is an
autoimmune disease. It manifests as severe gingivitis (gum
inflammation). The teeth themselves might look okay, but massive
damage is going on beneath the gums where the teeth/roots are eroding.
It's a very painful condition for the cat. This is not garden-variety
periodontal disease, although apparently it's not uncommon. Certain
purebreeds are more prone to it (although Tux is a domestic - that's
moggie for you Sheelagh :-). In the case of Tux, his teeth appeared
nice and white, but his gums were inflamed. Depending on the
severity of the condition (it can vary from tooth to tooth), the vet
either extracts or repairs the tooth (with some type of sealant, I
think). Apparently, there is no cure, and I can anticipate frequent
checkups and dental work in Tux's future in the hopes of helping him
hang onto his teeth for as long as possible (he's only four years
old), although he will most likely eventually .

Here's my question for Phil (or anyone else who knows): I was reading
at a website about the use of Fosamax to prevent or reverse this
condition (for anyone who doesn't know, Fosamax is used to prevent/
reverse osteoporosis in humans). Does anyone know anything about the
use of Fosamax for treating FORL in cats or can anyone direct me to
any research on this subject?
Thanks in advance.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Phil P.
November 5th 08, 10:38 PM
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
> Hi, everyone! I haven't been around here in a while. The youngest of
> my group, Tux, has been diagnosed with FORL (feline odontoclastic
> resorptive lesions). I have never seen this topic discussed on this
> group (although it may have been and I didn't see it).
>
> To summarize: It's a dental issue for which the cause is unknown but
> some of the theories are that it may be caused by a virus or is an
> autoimmune disease. It manifests as severe gingivitis (gum
> inflammation). The teeth themselves might look okay, but massive
> damage is going on beneath the gums where the teeth/roots are eroding.
> It's a very painful condition for the cat. This is not garden-variety
> periodontal disease, although apparently it's not uncommon. Certain
> purebreeds are more prone to it (although Tux is a domestic - that's
> moggie for you Sheelagh :-). In the case of Tux, his teeth appeared
> nice and white, but his gums were inflamed. Depending on the
> severity of the condition (it can vary from tooth to tooth), the vet
> either extracts or repairs the tooth (with some type of sealant, I
> think). Apparently, there is no cure, and I can anticipate frequent
> checkups and dental work in Tux's future in the hopes of helping him
> hang onto his teeth for as long as possible (he's only four years
> old), although he will most likely eventually .
>
> Here's my question for Phil (or anyone else who knows): I was reading
> at a website about the use of Fosamax to prevent or reverse this
> condition (for anyone who doesn't know, Fosamax is used to prevent/
> reverse osteoporosis in humans). Does anyone know anything about the
> use of Fosamax for treating FORL in cats or can anyone direct me to
> any research on this subject?
> Thanks in advance.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.

I've never heard of Fosamax reversing FORLs- Could you point me to the site?

Thanks,

Phil

---MIKE---
November 5th 08, 11:01 PM
Fosamax has been known to cause "jaw death" in humans. Dentists
recommend stopping Fosamax for at least six months before any extensive
dental procedures. I would think Fosamax would be the worst thing you
could give your cat.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')