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November 19th 08, 04:47 PM
We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
can do to help teach him?

Matthew[_3_]
November 19th 08, 07:26 PM
that looks just like my LIMO
> wrote in message
...
> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
> can do to help teach him?

Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an exterminator
than stop being a complete idiot

November 19th 08, 07:35 PM
On Nov 19, 1:26 pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:
> that looks just like my > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> > old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> > getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
> > laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
> > mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
> > also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
> > mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
> > by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
> > when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
> > they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
> > he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
> > there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
> > young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
> > can do to help teach him?
>
> Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an exterminator
> than stop being a complete idiot

I'd like to clear this up a little. I did not mean to imply that the
only reason we got him was to catch mice. we were looking for a pet,
and when it came time to decide between a cat (which i wanted) and a
dog (which my roommate wanted) the decision came down to cats being
able to catch mice. he's not a "cheap form of pest control", we're not
going to take him back, he's part of the family now I'm just trying to
learn a little about what might help him become a better hunter. Cats
are natural hunters, I know this, but since his mother did not bring
him any mice to practice on I was wondering if there's something I
should be doing. And truth be told he's probably not catching the mice
cause he's sound asleep in my bed!

Matthew[_3_]
November 19th 08, 07:41 PM
why did my post show up like that huh correct version
"> > wrote in message
> ...
>> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>> can do to help teach him?
>
Nope but you can take him back to where you got him if you want a mouse
trap and call an exterminator than stop being a complete idiot when it
comes to your cat. You cat is not a machine since you are a first time
poster here I am thinking TROLL

Matthew[_3_]
November 19th 08, 07:46 PM
> wrote in message
...
> On Nov 19, 1:26 pm, "Matthew" >
> wrote:
>> that looks just like my > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>> > We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> > old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>> > getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>> > laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>> > mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>> > also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>> > mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>> > by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>> > when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>> > they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>> > he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>> > there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>> > young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>> > can do to help teach him?
>>
>> Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an
>> exterminator
>> than stop being a complete idiot
>
> I'd like to clear this up a little. I did not mean to imply that the
> only reason we got him was to catch mice. we were looking for a pet,
> and when it came time to decide between a cat (which i wanted) and a
> dog (which my roommate wanted) the decision came down to cats being
> able to catch mice. he's not a "cheap form of pest control", we're not
> going to take him back, he's part of the family now I'm just trying to
> learn a little about what might help him become a better hunter. Cats
> are natural hunters, I know this, but since his mother did not bring
> him any mice to practice on I was wondering if there's something I
> should be doing. And truth be told he's probably not catching the mice
> cause he's sound asleep in my bed!

Ok than ignore my posts but when you post what you did What do you think we
are going to think

1 call an exterminator rats and mice carry disease and you could kill
your cat
2 cats are natural hunters unless it learns from another cat or mom they
will maime their prey and more inlikley play with it not knowing what to do
so unless you want a tidying on your pillow that is still alive CALL AN
EXTERMINATOR
3 IMO please keep your cat inside there are so many reason to do so

November 19th 08, 07:52 PM
On Nov 19, 1:41 pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:
> why did my post show up like that huh correct version
>
> "> > wrote in message
> ...
> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
> >> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
> >> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
> >> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
> >> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
> >> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
> >> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
> >> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
> >> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
> >> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
> >> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
> >> can do to help teach him?
>
> Nope but you can take him back to where you got him if you want a mouse
> trap and call an exterminator than stop being a complete idiot when it
> comes to your cat. You cat is not a machine since you are a first time
> poster here I am thinking TROLL

and actually we rescued the kitten who was being kept on a freezing
cold porch, hadn't been taken to the vet, was covered in fleas and
clearly malnourished. he's now much healthier and being properly taken
care of. and on a side note, I came to this discussion board because I
was curious if i was missing something and was met with judgmental
assumptions about who i am as a cat owner. if i were a negligent owner
who saw my cat as a "cheap form of pest control" then I would probably
not go to the trouble of trying to learn more. In addition, I was
under the assumption that this discussion board would be helpful in
answering some of my questions. Instead I have been called a 'complete
idiot' for asking simple questions. I would suggest that in the future
you think a little more about your posts so that rather than drive
people away with your harsh criticism you welcome their input and
questions, which is after all the entire purpose of discussion.

If anyone has any useful and helpful input I welcome it. If you merely
want to call me an idiot and imply that I am in some way less than
loving of my cat then I'd appreciate if you keep your misinformed and
myopic opinions to yourself. Thank you.

Matthew[_3_]
November 19th 08, 09:25 PM
> wrote in message
...
> On Nov 19, 1:41 pm, "Matthew" >
> wrote:
>> why did my post show up like that huh correct version
>>
>> "> > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>> >> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>> >> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>> >> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>> >> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>> >> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>> >> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>> >> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>> >> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>> >> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>> >> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>> >> can do to help teach him?
>>
>> Nope but you can take him back to where you got him if you want a mouse
>> trap and call an exterminator than stop being a complete idiot when it
>> comes to your cat. You cat is not a machine since you are a first time
>> poster here I am thinking TROLL
>
> and actually we rescued the kitten who was being kept on a freezing
> cold porch, hadn't been taken to the vet, was covered in fleas and
> clearly malnourished. he's now much healthier and being properly taken
> care of. and on a side note, I came to this discussion board because I
> was curious if i was missing something and was met with judgmental
> assumptions about who i am as a cat owner. if i were a negligent owner
> who saw my cat as a "cheap form of pest control" then I would probably
> not go to the trouble of trying to learn more. In addition, I was
> under the assumption that this discussion board would be helpful in
> answering some of my questions. Instead I have been called a 'complete
> idiot' for asking simple questions. I would suggest that in the future
> you think a little more about your posts so that rather than drive
> people away with your harsh criticism you welcome their input and
> questions, which is after all the entire purpose of discussion.
>
> If anyone has any useful and helpful input I welcome it. If you merely
> want to call me an idiot and imply that I am in some way less than
> loving of my cat then I'd appreciate if you keep your misinformed and
> myopic opinions to yourself. Thank you.


Well no offense when you come on here and say you want the cat to catch mice
WTF do you expect

cshenk
November 19th 08, 09:55 PM
> wrote

>> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the

Hi Meghan. He's too young. What will happen when he gets older is he will
probably scare the mice into finding some other place.

In the meantime, be careful about any mouse traps. Some of them can be
dangerous to your kitten too. Broken toes etc.

November 19th 08, 09:58 PM
On Nov 19, 3:55 pm, "cshenk" > wrote:
> > wrote
>
> >> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> >> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> >> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>
> Hi Meghan. He's too young. What will happen when he gets older is he will
> probably scare the mice into finding some other place.
>
> In the meantime, be careful about any mouse traps. Some of them can be
> dangerous to your kitten too. Broken toes etc.

Great thank you!

cybercat
November 19th 08, 10:27 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Nov 19, 1:41 pm, "Matthew" >
>> wrote:
>>> why did my post show up like that huh correct version
>>>
>>> "> > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>>> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>>> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>>> >> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those
>>> >> little
>>> >> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>>> >> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>>> >> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran
>>> >> right
>>> >> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>>> >> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>>> >> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>>> >> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>>> >> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>>> >> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>>> >> can do to help teach him?
>>>
>>> Nope but you can take him back to where you got him if you want a
>>> mouse
>>> trap and call an exterminator than stop being a complete idiot when it
>>> comes to your cat. You cat is not a machine since you are a first time
>>> poster here I am thinking TROLL
>>
>> and actually we rescued the kitten who was being kept on a freezing
>> cold porch, hadn't been taken to the vet, was covered in fleas and
>> clearly malnourished. he's now much healthier and being properly taken
>> care of. and on a side note, I came to this discussion board because I
>> was curious if i was missing something and was met with judgmental
>> assumptions about who i am as a cat owner. if i were a negligent owner
>> who saw my cat as a "cheap form of pest control" then I would probably
>> not go to the trouble of trying to learn more. In addition, I was
>> under the assumption that this discussion board would be helpful in
>> answering some of my questions. Instead I have been called a 'complete
>> idiot' for asking simple questions. I would suggest that in the future
>> you think a little more about your posts so that rather than drive
>> people away with your harsh criticism you welcome their input and
>> questions, which is after all the entire purpose of discussion.
>>
>> If anyone has any useful and helpful input I welcome it. If you merely
>> want to call me an idiot and imply that I am in some way less than
>> loving of my cat then I'd appreciate if you keep your misinformed and
>> myopic opinions to yourself. Thank you.
>
>
> Well no offense when you come on here and say you want the cat to catch
> mice WTF do you expect
>
Precisely. Poor cat.

cybercat
November 19th 08, 11:01 PM
> wrote
> and actually we rescued the kitten who was being kept on a freezing
> cold porch, hadn't been taken to the vet, was covered in fleas and
> clearly malnourished. he's now much healthier and being properly taken
> care of. and on a side note, I came to this discussion board because I
> was curious if i was missing something


You wrote, first line: "We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house."
This group is full of people who really like and love cats. Get it?

CatNipped[_2_]
November 19th 08, 11:24 PM
> wrote in message
...
> On Nov 19, 1:41 pm, "Matthew" >
> wrote:
>> why did my post show up like that huh correct version
>>
>> "> > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>> >> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>> >> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>> >> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>> >> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>> >> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>> >> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>> >> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>> >> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>> >> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>> >> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>> >> can do to help teach him?
>>
>> Nope but you can take him back to where you got him if you want a mouse
>> trap and call an exterminator than stop being a complete idiot when it
>> comes to your cat. You cat is not a machine since you are a first time
>> poster here I am thinking TROLL
>
> and actually we rescued the kitten who was being kept on a freezing
> cold porch, hadn't been taken to the vet, was covered in fleas and
> clearly malnourished. he's now much healthier and being properly taken
> care of. and on a side note, I came to this discussion board because I
> was curious if i was missing something and was met with judgmental
> assumptions about who i am as a cat owner. if i were a negligent owner
> who saw my cat as a "cheap form of pest control" then I would probably
> not go to the trouble of trying to learn more. In addition, I was
> under the assumption that this discussion board would be helpful in
> answering some of my questions. Instead I have been called a 'complete
> idiot' for asking simple questions. I would suggest that in the future
> you think a little more about your posts so that rather than drive
> people away with your harsh criticism you welcome their input and
> questions, which is after all the entire purpose of discussion.
>
> If anyone has any useful and helpful input I welcome it. If you merely
> want to call me an idiot and imply that I am in some way less than
> loving of my cat then I'd appreciate if you keep your misinformed and
> myopic opinions to yourself. Thank you.

This is getting to seem like a broken record, huh guys?

Look, n00b - this is UseNet, not your Aunt Fanny's parlor. Nobody here
knows you or knows what you are like to your cat - we can only go by what
you post. When you come here with stupid questions expect to be flamed -
such is life.

Hugs,

CatNipped

Christina Websell
November 20th 08, 12:22 AM
> wrote in message
...
> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
> can do to help teach him?

Yes, he is far too young to catch mice. Kittens who have never been taught
by their mother may never "get it" entirely. They may catch them as they
get older but not know how to deliver that killing bite. It took my boy 3
years or so of hunting outside to stop releasing live prey in my kitchen.
Fortunately the light bulb went on one day. I don't think there is anything
you can do to teach him yourself, especially as an indoor cat.

cybercat
November 20th 08, 01:20 AM
"Christina Websell" > wrote

> I don't think there is anything you can do to teach him yourself,
> especially as an indoor cat.
>

Which does not mean she should let her cat roam outside, Christina. Unless
the kitten really is a disposable mouse trap.

cybercat
November 20th 08, 01:21 AM
"Christina Websell" > wrote
>
> Yes, he is far too young to catch mice. Kittens who have never been
> taught by their mother may never "get it" entirely. They may catch them
> as they get older but not know how to deliver that killing bite. It took
> my boy 3 years or so of hunting outside to stop releasing live prey in my
> kitchen. Fortunately the light bulb went on one day. I don't think there
> is anything you can do to teach him yourself, especially as an indoor cat.
>

You are also fortunate that your cats have not caught parasites or diseases
from those rodents.

cshenk
November 20th 08, 02:34 AM
> wrote

> "cshenk" > wrote:

>> >> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> >> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's
>> >> >> not
>> >> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>>
>> Hi Meghan. He's too young. What will happen when he gets older is he
>> will
>> probably scare the mice into finding some other place.
>>
>> In the meantime, be careful about any mouse traps. Some of them can be
>> dangerous to your kitten too. Broken toes etc.
>
> Great thank you!

Sure thing. Vet is right BTW, on keeping him inside. I know some in rural
areas do have outdoor cats but generally they are healthier if kept inside
(and wont get run over if you live near a road).

I lived once in a farm house for a bit and we had lots of little mice for a
time. Took a bit to seal up all their entry holes. House came with a 2
toed cat, reputed to have been hurt by a mouse trap (we do not know for
sure, but we didnt use mouse traps that snap because of him).

In this group you will see a fairly average crossmatch of usenet, from
friendly to kooks. The best advice anyone can give is to run anything that
sounds odd, by your vet. Like someone just said that you can use dog type
flea medicine on a cat and just adjust the dosage. Umm, I wouldnt do that.
It may be she is right for some brands, but it doesnt sound right and i know
it wont work for the higher end precription stuff we use here.

cshenk
November 20th 08, 02:46 AM
"cybercat" wrote
> "Christina Websell" wrote

>> Yes, he is far too young to catch mice. Kittens who have never been
>> taught by their mother may never "get it" entirely. They may catch them
>> as they get older but not know how to deliver that killing bite. It took
>> my boy 3 years or so of hunting outside to stop releasing live prey in my
>> kitchen. Fortunately the light bulb went on one day. I don't think there
>> is anything you can do to teach him yourself, especially as an indoor
>> cat.

> You are also fortunate that your cats have not caught parasites or
> diseases from those rodents.

Grin, actually Christina sounds familiar. Lives out in the country if i
recall right? I may be mixing her with another though. Was a lady with a
heated barn (cows and all that). Cat door to the kitchen.

Humm, now was the name Christina? Was definately a UK person on a farm with
cows and a heated barn. Some folks took after that lady for having 'outdoor
cats in winter' before they read on to see the heated barn.

DWMeowMix
November 20th 08, 07:12 PM
On Nov 19, 8:47*am, wrote:
> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
> can do to help teach him?

Hi Megha...

I've had multitudes of cats my whole life and I've NEVER had a cat
that would actually hunt. I've had a couple that would play with mice
and kill them leaving 1/2 their bodies and nasty entrails laying about
and one that caught a live garden snake (the exception, after a little
coaxing he adopted me after I found him living under an abandoned
house) and gave it to me as a gift. But other than Tang (the snake
cat) none of them actually hunted.

They did do a mighty fine job of scaring off any little varmits
though! I've never had a rodent problem...ever.

DWMeowMix

Stan Brown
November 21st 08, 07:23 PM
Wed, 19 Nov 2008 15:55:42 -0500 from cshenk >:
> > wrote
>
> > [quoted text muted]
> >> >> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
> >> >> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
> >> >> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>
> Hi Meghan. He's too young. What will happen when he gets older is he will
> probably scare the mice into finding some other place.
>
> In the meantime, be careful about any mouse traps. Some of them can be
> dangerous to your kitten too. Broken toes etc.

I would worry, too, about what parasites or diseases the mice might
be carrying. They are a prime source of intestinal worms, if I recall
correctly.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

November 21st 08, 07:24 PM
Oh, good KEeerist~!!~

Please note the interpolations.

On Nov 19, 1:46*pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:

> Ok than ignore my posts but when you post what you did What do you think we
> are going to think
>
> 1 *call an exterminator * *rats and mice carry disease and you could kill
> your cat

Rats and mice carry disease, true. But cats are feral creatures which
in order to be complete (as a cat) must hunt. A properly vaccinated
cat with a systemic insect treatment is safer from these diseases than
the human in charge. Any one who has the gift of curiosity and has
done any research at all on "ratting cats" will discover that the best
hunters are well-fed, well-cared-for family pets. These cats will hunt
for sport, not for food. This means that they will wipe out a mouse
population for the sport of it. Cats who hunt by necessity take only
what they must and ignore the rest.

> 2 cats are natural hunters unless it learns from another cat or mom * they
> will maime their prey and more inlikley play with it not knowing what to do
> so unless you want a tidying on your pillow that is still alive * *CALL AN
> EXTERMINATOR

Cats will play with their prey. That is also a natural behavior.
Mother cats give their kittens half-dead prey so they can learn to
kill without danger. Most so-called "adult" cats kept as pets are
*victims* of severely arrested development - large kittens if you
will. This is NOT good for the mental and emotional well-being of the
animal. As to leaving dead animals on the pillow, doorstep, whatever,
that is displacement behavior. They perceive us as particularly
incompetent hunters and wish to feed us. When they do this, PRAISE
THEM. TAKE THE DEAD CREATURE AND HIDE IT - so they think you ate it.
They think that they are doing you a huge favor and absolutely do not
understand any other reaction than appreciation.

> 3 IMO please keep your cat inside there are so many reason to do so-

Of course there are. And imagine if you were kept in a few rooms with
no entertainment other than that given grudgingly by huge creatures
who haven't a clue as to your real needs. No stimulation, nothing new,
nothing remarkable... ever... forever. Now you have a pretty good idea
of the typical house-cat's life after it gets past "cute kittenhood".
It may live a very long time and be superficially very healthy. You
would too if you were lobotomized and kept, clean and well-fed, in a
closet.

On a personal basis, our oldest cat (Boswell, Maine Coon, 12 years
old) has managed prey without any damage of any kind up to the size of
a yearling raccoon. He has brought home, live and undamaged for the
young dog to play with, squirrels, rabbits and chipmunks. He is
perhaps the happiest cat we have ever had - and one of the healthiest.
He is training his new kitten well - who is as-yet too young to go out
(we wait a year). He has twice saved lives by his direct action.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.antiques.radio+phono/browse_frm/thread/b820065c0a37cb16?hl=en&q=boswell+peter+wieck

Follow that thread for the history.

I have also directly employed a cat in a very serious and professional
environment. He retired a short time ago at 19.

http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/current/1999/022599/Raider.html

No pet should be a personal appendage on the order of a piece of
jewelry or bit of art. They are living creatures with real needs that
are a 'requirement of nature' if you will. By building a mythology of
what is 'best for them' even though it thwarts their nature makes them
nothing at all more than that bit of soothing fluff - not a living,
breathing, creature that should !CHOOSE! to share our lives much as we
choose to share with it.

If your dog (large or small) cannot get off its leash and run every
day until it is tired - don't get a dog. If your cat cannot hunt
natural prey and you are not prepared to spend the time and effort to
provide genuine substitutions equally as stimulating - don't get a
cat. Keep in mind that unlike a dog, a healthy cat will sleep up to 22
hours a day at the extreme, more like 16 hours on average - so they
are somewhat easier to entertain than a dog.

As for Meghan - not to worry. Your kitten will learn to hunt without
adult-cat supervision. It will be awkward, sloppy and difficult at
first. But eventually he will get the hang of it. And when it comes to
exterminators - Don't if mice are your only problem. They have all of
two things they can do. Traps or poison. Traps get only the dumb ones
and you can do that just as well as they can (hint: use peanut-butter,
better Reese's Cups as bait - mice will eat cheese only if there is NO
alternative. All but white-footed deer mice are vegetarian). And
poison presents massive environmental problems even if not a direct
threat to your pets.

Otherwise, enjoy your kitten. And try to understand that eventually it
will become a cat - just as much pleasure but at an entirely different
level.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Matthew[_3_]
November 21st 08, 10:07 PM
you actually have a lot to learn about cats


> wrote in message
...
Oh, good KEeerist~!!~

<snipped>

November 21st 08, 10:20 PM
On Nov 21, 4:07*pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:

> you actually have a lot to learn about cats

Absolutely. Every day, a bit more. But I am not blind to their needs
and nature as you appear to be - OK, perhaps 'blind' is an imprecise
word but it is either that or denial.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Matthew[_3_]
November 21st 08, 10:54 PM
ROFLMAO
Sorry not blind or in denial but why would I want to debate or explain this
with a 3 time poster. Stick around you will learn something



> wrote in message
...
On Nov 21, 4:07 pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:

> you actually have a lot to learn about cats


< snipped >

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 12:33 AM
> wrote in message
...
Oh, good KEeerist~!!~

Please note the interpolations.

On Nov 19, 1:46 pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:

> Ok than ignore my posts but when you post what you did What do you think
> we
> are going to think
>
> 1 call an exterminator rats and mice carry disease and you could kill
> your cat

Rats and mice carry disease, true. But cats are feral creatures which
in order to be complete (as a cat) must hunt.

Domesticated cats are not "feral creatures." Idiot.

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 12:37 AM
> wrote in message
...
On Nov 21, 4:07 pm, "Matthew" >
wrote:

> you actually have a lot to learn about cats

>Absolutely. Every day, a bit more. But I am not blind to their needs
>and nature as you appear to be - OK, perhaps 'blind' is an imprecise
>word but it is either that or denial.


It is not that you have a lot to learn, it is that you are a moron. Cats
have no "need" to hunt when you're feeding them every day. Play takes care
of the stalking and pouncing and "killing" instincts. My tabby conquers a
rubber snake several times a day with great howling and presents it to me
proudly. She also catches an occasional mouse, but does not injest them or
even draw blood from what I can see. If there was evidence that she was
eating them I would be concerned.

Matthew[_3_]
November 22nd 08, 12:46 AM
"cybercat" >

Hey I am trying to be a nice guy for the holidays :-)

Who got hold of your giblets < gobble gobble>

<evil smile><evil laugh>
<running for cover>

November 22nd 08, 01:50 AM
On Nov 21, 6:33*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:

> Domesticated cats are not "feral creatures." Idiot.

Now, who has a lot to learn about cats?

Although well-fed cats do not 'need' to hunt, they make the best
ratters historically. They hunt for sport - much as the rubber-snake
hunter hunts for the best it can get. But it would be infinitely
happier if that snake were to surprise it one day - and give it a
genuine challenge. Writing of snakes and cats, many families in
Arabia, India and North Africa living in the countryside keep cats
against snakes rather than any other animal. Cats are much faster than
ferrets or mongooses to that end - and also appear to understand the
danger in snakes more clearly than either of the other two. One of my
staff (Indian) when I was working in Saudi had pictures of his cat
with her snake kills - she was 15 in the latest picture I saw. He
described her as a 2-kilo cat (about 4.5 pounds) - and its largest
kill was a 150cm cobra (about 5 feet).

But much as cats are obligatory carnivores, they also must hunt for
their health and sanity. We may have committed several hundred years
of genetic modifications to cats, but just as every dog thinks it is a
wolf, every cat thinks it is a tiger. To believe otherwise is to be in
acute denial of the evolutionary imperative that resulted in the cat
in the first place.

Now, humans come along and wish to adapt their cats to a sedentary
life-style, feed them primarily on grains and deny where they came
from and why they came from there. How nice for the humans, how
wretchedly awful for their cats. Please don't think I believe cats
should be fed on raw meat and forced to 'adapt or die', breed at will,
go unvetted. Not hardly. But they should be able to explore the
entirety of their natures - hopefully in reasonable safety - but at
least that much. They are feral - any reasonably healthy cat even on
short notice can adapt to a predatory life (asuming that game is
available) if the worst should happen. That is NOT a desirable state,
of course, but it is in their nature and one of their innate
abilities. Just as humans have canine teeth for tearing raw meat. Not
something we would like to do on a daily basis - but isn't it nice to
know that it is possible in a pinch? If we wish to manage the nature
of our cats (and ourselves) for the best possible life for them (and
ourselves) we had damned well better understand them (and ourselves).
Cats choose to live with humans - but of all our pets capable of
actual interaction with us, they have the least need to do so.

We observe lots of displacement behavior in our cats - it cannot
possibly be because they are innate hunters and miss the sport and the
rush - so we re-define it. Sad for the cat, conscience-appeasing for
us. But twaddle either way. Again, don't keep a dog unless it can run
every day until it is tired (we have two). Don't keep a cat unless it
can interact with its environment, hunt, explore and be curious.
Something new every day.

Do some research: the territorial range of a healthy, well-fed adult
male cat (being neutered does not appear to make a difference) vs. the
size of even a large house - or an apartment. And then a female
(again, neutering does not appear to make much of a difference).
Unless one knows and understands these things, a great deal is just
lost to the keeper and the cat.

http://www.boop.org/jan/justso/cat.htm

Another time, another age, but Kipling got it pretty much right.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 03:58 AM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
ng.com...
>
> "cybercat" >
>
> Hey I am trying to be a nice guy for the holidays :-)
>
> Who got hold of your giblets < gobble gobble>
>
> <evil smile><evil laugh>
> <running for cover>
>

At least I'm consistent. :)

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 04:09 AM
> wrote:

>Another time, another age, but Kipling got it pretty much right.

No he didn't.

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 04:11 AM
> wrote in message ...
On Nov 21, 6:33 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:

> Domesticated cats are not "feral creatures." Idiot.

>Now, who has a lot to learn about cats?




>http://www.boop.org/jan/justso/cat.htm


Jesus. Are you serious?? Rudyard Kipling? He wrote fanciful fiction, moron. And he lived 150 years ago, before cars, before the widespread urbanization of so many countries.

Please go away. And take the other aggressively stupid people with you.

November 22nd 08, 03:23 PM
On Nov 21, 10:11*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:

> Jesus. Are you serious?? Rudyard Kipling? He wrote fanciful fiction, moron. And he lived 150 years ago, before cars, before the widespread urbanization of so many countries.
>
> Please go away. And take the other aggressively stupid people with you.

You don't read for content, much do you? Pretty much have your mind
made up and iron-bound by your received wisdom?

Kipling was emphatically NOT dictating how cats should be kept and
managed - what he did do was clearly recognize their nature. And,
sadly, how much of the world perceives them - then and now - often
with fear, aggression and a lack of understanding. You display that
lack - although you do seem to be enamored of cats - what little you
actually *know* about them. Try broadening your perceptions - betcha
both you and your cats will be happier for it. Try getting out to the
country at some point and watch barn cats engage in cooperative
hunting behavior - that would be a revealing start. By the way,
although cats are opportunistic hunters, their preference is dawn and
dusk, when their vision relative to their typical prey is at its best.
The term is 'crepuscular'. So try to get out then. And, their prey
under unrestricted conditions (and assuming that they are well fed -
hungry cats will pretty much attack anything they can kill) is ~95%
ground mammal, and 5% all-the-rest (including birds)). Of those
mammals they are almost always vermin. Not cute, cuddly bunnies or
nice cute clever little chipmunks.... although what a family of
chimpunks can do with house wiring in a few days might cause a change
in perception.

Cats may be soft, cute, cuddly, friendly housepets as we would like
them to be 'ever and always'. But that is only a tiny part of what
they are. To deny the rest of it because that is the way you would
like it to be is narcissitic at least. And very likely cruel. Humans
breed cats into retarded show-pieces and think it is "good'. Ah, well
- in the panorama of human stupidity and cruelty, that is a relatively
small thing.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 06:14 PM
> wrote in message
...
On Nov 21, 10:11 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:

> Jesus. Are you serious?? Rudyard Kipling? He wrote fanciful fiction,
> moron. And he lived 150 years ago, before cars, before the widespread
> urbanization of so many countries.
>
> Please go away. And take the other aggressively stupid people with you.

>You don't read for content, much do you?

I do, just not your content. You're arguing that domestic house cats "need
to hunt." That's horse ****. The rest is you being long-winded and trying at
some kind of intellectualism that you're not up to.

I suggest you try alt.literary.aspirations.

November 22nd 08, 06:28 PM
On Nov 22, 12:14*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> > wrote in message
>
> ...
> On Nov 21, 10:11 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> > Jesus. Are you serious?? Rudyard Kipling? He wrote fanciful fiction,
> > moron. And he lived 150 years ago, before cars, before the widespread
> > urbanization of so many countries.
>
> > Please go away. And take the other aggressively stupid people with you.
> >You don't read for content, much do you?
>
> I do, just not your content. You're arguing that domestic house cats "need
> to hunt." That's horse ****. The rest is you being long-winded and trying at
> some kind of intellectualism that you're not up to.

Aha! So, you have wisdom from some source that flies in the face of
perhaps half-a-million years of successful adaptation (evolution, if
you permit that concept)? Please point to that source. Unless you are
able to do so, and unless that source has some basis for its
assertions, all you have is happy-feelgood-crap based on wishful
thinking.

Once again, cats are natural predators with highly developed
instinctive hunting skills for which their bodies are ideally suited.
What gives us the gall, much less the authority to deny that part of
their natures - supress it or worse? Once again, we get all sorts of
displacement behavior with bored cats and have the almighty chutzpah
to think it is their problem. Just a scintilla of basic understanding
of their natures would make them infinitely happier - but for you,
that appears to be quite threatening, also very likely more care than
you wish to take.

Try this observance, if you have a mind for it (or a mind at all, for
that matter). Watch a mature cat near a person - then with another cat
or other animal. Observe carefully. With a person, that cat acts
kittenish - behavior it has found that gets it food, affection and
attention. With another animal or left alone, it acts as part of its
environment - if interesting enough to it - and not kittenish at all.
They are NOT toys, not appendages, not put on this earth for our
entertainement. Painful as that may be to comprehend.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Cheryl
November 22nd 08, 09:33 PM
> wrote in message
...

Once again, cats are natural predators with highly developed
instinctive hunting skills for which their bodies are ideally suited.
What gives us the gall, much less the authority to deny that part of
their natures - supress it or worse?

===================================

I would love if my cats could go outside, if it was safe for them. I live on
a busy road and they'd be roadkill. To suggest that only people who can
allow cats to roam outdoors should have them is to condemn a lot more cats
to death for lack of homes. We (humans) caused the overpopulation problem,
we have to be responsible for it. If that means "inadequate" homes for them
because they can't go out, well, we're taking care of the problem. If cats
weren't pets and free to give birth normally, nature would weed out the
weak, or there'd be even more of a population problem, like we have with
deer. Actually I think that if domestic cats became wild again evolution
would change them to survive. Like give the females more nipples so they can
have larger litters.

Cats are pets. Get over yourself.

cybercat
November 22nd 08, 11:10 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote
>
> Cats are pets. Get over yourself.

Nicely put.

November 23rd 08, 01:07 AM
On Nov 22, 3:33*pm, "Cheryl" > wrote:

> Cats are pets. *Get over yourself.

Never wrote that they *must* go outside. What I wrote is that they
*must* have a stimulating outlet for their natural predatory (feral)
instincts that is sufficiently and continuously unusual that they are
are sufficiently stimulated as to be *real* cats.

Cats are pets. But cats are NOT ONLY pets. And it is the "ONLY" pets
crowd that is the most damaging to cats. Imagine being in prison.
Safe, well fed, no threats. Boring. Worse than boring, an entirely
unnatural environment. Unhappy things take place in prisons -
unnatural things take place in prisons. That would be your cat unless
you take extraordinary efforts to make your environment real to it.
Rubber snakes don't quite cut it, with all due respect.

500,000 years of adaptation does not get easily or meekly put aside.
Get over that!

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Matthew[_3_]
November 23rd 08, 01:13 AM
Take up religion you are in a losing battle with people who really know
cats
>

Cheryl
November 23rd 08, 01:49 AM
> wrote in message
...
On Nov 22, 3:33 pm, "Cheryl" > wrote:

> Cats are pets. Get over yourself.

Never wrote that they *must* go outside. What I wrote is that they
*must* have a stimulating outlet for their natural predatory (feral)
instincts that is sufficiently and continuously unusual that they are
are sufficiently stimulated as to be *real* cats.

Cats are pets. But cats are NOT ONLY pets. And it is the "ONLY" pets
crowd that is the most damaging to cats. Imagine being in prison.
Safe, well fed, no threats. Boring. Worse than boring, an entirely
unnatural environment. Unhappy things take place in prisons -
unnatural things take place in prisons. That would be your cat unless
you take extraordinary efforts to make your environment real to it.
Rubber snakes don't quite cut it, with all due respect.

500,000 years of adaptation does not get easily or meekly put aside.
Get over that!

================================

I apologize. I took this paragraph out of context:

"If your dog (large or small) cannot get off its leash and run every
day until it is tired - don't get a dog. If your cat cannot hunt
natural prey and you are not prepared to spend the time and effort to
provide genuine substitutions equally as stimulating - don't get a
cat. Keep in mind that unlike a dog, a healthy cat will sleep up to 22
hours a day at the extreme, more like 16 hours on average - so they
are somewhat easier to entertain than a dog."

You did write "substitutions equally as stimulating" so I take back what I
wrote about "must go outside". It's just that there are so many *indoor vs.
outdoor* debates in these groups and I thought you were promoting outdoors
as "required".

Cheryl

November 23rd 08, 02:38 AM
On Nov 22, 7:49*pm, "Cheryl" > wrote:

> You did write "substitutions equally as stimulating" so I take back what I
> wrote about "must go outside". *It's just that there are so many *indoor vs.
> outdoor* debates in these groups and I thought you were promoting outdoors
> as "required".

Thank you. Having cats choose to live with you is not an easy road to
take. But the efforts, when taken, are more than worth it. Those
efforts not taken are nothing less than cruel.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Cheryl
November 23rd 08, 03:19 AM
> wrote in message
...
On Nov 22, 7:49 pm, "Cheryl" > wrote:

> You did write "substitutions equally as stimulating" so I take back what I
> wrote about "must go outside". It's just that there are so many *indoor
> vs.
> outdoor* debates in these groups and I thought you were promoting outdoors
> as "required".

Thank you. Having cats choose to live with you is not an easy road to
take. But the efforts, when taken, are more than worth it. Those
efforts not taken are nothing less than cruel.


======================================

I think most of the regs here agree with you on that and provide stimulating
indoor environments. I have 4 indoor cats and 2 mice. Even the mice have a
stimulating environment that changes every time I clean the tank. The cats
have more stuff than I do, and everything is very thought out.

November 24th 08, 12:51 PM
On Nov 22, 9:19*pm, "Cheryl" > wrote:

> I think most of the regs here agree with you on that and provide stimulating
> indoor environments. *I have 4 indoor cats and 2 mice. *Even the mice have a
> stimulating environment that changes every time I clean the tank. * The cats
> have more stuff than I do, and everything is very thought out.

That sort of thought would be the exception in the universe of keeping
pets, sadly.

It is just that when I see a couple of self-righteous, largely
ignorant, entirely thoughtless fools tee off on an individual for
asking a perfectly innocent question, I have to wonder as to their
motives. They are certainly not towards enlightenment on the care and
feeding of cats. Otherwise, I would have sat on my fingers and lurked
as is my wont.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

John Doe
August 13th 09, 01:04 AM
Daniel Bernard > wrote:

> wrote:

>> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house.

> Why not remove those appliances, looks for holes in the
> wall/skirting boards and block off those areas temporarily with
> wire wool then call in professional exterminators?

Pests that live off of human debris are easy to get rid off.

Stop feeding them.

Pests can even be useful by pointing out the places that you are
being messy. By killing the pests... You end up with dead pests, new
pests to take their place, pesticides (if you use an exterminator),
and you still have a messy home.

John Doe
August 13th 09, 01:08 AM
This troll, like the patently offensive "cybercat" he defends,
uses the pretense "I love cats" as an excuse to insult others here.


"Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com> wrote:

> Path: news.astraweb.com!router1.astraweb.com!news-out.octanews.net!mauve.octanews.net!nx02.iad.newsh osting.com!newshosting.com!69.16.185.51.MISMATCH!t mp-post01.iad!news.highwinds-media.com!not-for-mail
> From: "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com>
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> References: <6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com>
> Subject: Re: Too young to catch mice?
> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:26:48 -0500
> X-Priority: 3
> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.5512
> X-MIMEOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.5579
> X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
> Lines: 22
> Message-ID: <49245a56$0$4955$9a6e19ea unlimited.newshosting.com>
> Organization: Newshosting.com - Highest quality at a great price! www.newshosting.com
> NNTP-Posting-Host: 72.189.107.90
> X-Complaints-To: abuse newshosting.com
>
> that looks just like my LIMO
> <meghanwh gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>> can do to help teach him?
>
> Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an exterminator
> than stop being a complete idiot
>
>
>
>

cybercat
August 13th 09, 01:22 AM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> This troll, like the patently offensive "cybercat" he defends,
> uses the pretense "I love cats" as an excuse to insult others here.
>
>
> "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com> wrote:
>
>> Path:
>> news.astraweb.com!router1.astraweb.com!news-out.octanews.net!mauve.octanews.net!nx02.iad.newsh osting.com!newshosting.com!69.16.185.51.MISMATCH!t mp-post01.iad!news.highwinds-media.com!not-for-mail
>> From: "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com>
>> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>> References: <6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e
>> w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com>
>> Subject: Re: Too young to catch mice?
>> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:26:48 -0500
>> X-Priority: 3
>> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
>> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.5512
>> X-MIMEOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.5579
>> X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
>> Lines: 22
>> Message-ID: <49245a56$0$4955$9a6e19ea unlimited.newshosting.com>
>> Organization: Newshosting.com - Highest quality at a great price!
>> www.newshosting.com
>> NNTP-Posting-Host: 72.189.107.90
>> X-Complaints-To: abuse newshosting.com
>>
>> that looks just like my LIMO
>> <meghanwh gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>>> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>>> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>>> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>>> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>>> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>>> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>>> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>>> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>>> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>>> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>>> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>>> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>>> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>>> can do to help teach him?
>>
>> Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an
>> exterminator
>> than stop being a complete idiot
>>
>>

Mark, you are responding to a post from November 2008. Save yourself some
trouble and go back on your meds.

John Doe
August 13th 09, 01:36 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote:

> > wrote in message

>> Having cats choose to live with you is not an easy road to
>> take. But the efforts, when taken, are more than worth it.
>> Those efforts not taken are nothing less than cruel.

> I think most of the regs here agree with you on that and provide
> stimulating indoor environments.

Just visiting, but Yup.

My cats have the outside sounds (thanks to an infant room monitor
with the microphone stuck outside), a view through a window
(closed during the summer), and a skyway where they regularly hang
out. They are provided with the things I perceive that the animals
would like to have, mainly exercise and stimulation.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3190773594/

FWIW. I always take in strays and as a rule I like to feel that
their environment is better with me than it would be outside. I
keep them from getting outside... But one good objective test IMO
is when you open the door, do they stay inside or do they run out
the door. If they get outside by chance/accident, how long before
they come back inside. My feral female would probably bolt/flee at
least for a while, but that is because she has some serious mental
illness (real live paranoia).

Good luck and have fun.

John Doe
August 13th 09, 01:45 AM
"cybercat" <cyberpurrs yahoo.com> wrote:

> Mark, you are responding to a post from November 2008. Save yourself some
> trouble

You need attention, CyberTroll, I can be your attention giver
for at least a little while.

> and go back on your meds.

The mentally ill typically have better manners than you, CyberTroll.
























>
>
>
>
> Path: news.astraweb.com!border5.newsrouter.astraweb.com! npeer02.iad.highwinds-media.com!news.highwinds-media.com!feed-me.highwinds-media.com!post01.iad.highwinds-media.com!newsfe14.iad.POSTED!bd088a30!not-for-mail
> From: "cybercat" <cyberpurrs yahoo.com>
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav,free.usenet
> References: <6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com> <49245a56$0$4955$9a6e19ea unlimited.newshosting.com> <00bba477$0$31981$c3e8da3 news.astraweb.com>
> Subject: Re: Too young to catch mice?
> Lines: 57
> X-Priority: 3
> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.5512
> X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
> X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.5579
> Message-ID: <e1Jgm.141181$Qg6.50101 newsfe14.iad>
> X-Complaints-To: abuse teranews.com
> NNTP-Posting-Date: Thu, 13 Aug 2009 00:22:34 UTC
> Organization: TeraNews.com
> Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2009 20:22:32 -0400
>
>

John Doe
August 13th 09, 09:53 PM
"cybercat" > wrote:

> > wrote in message
>> "Matthew" > wrote:

>>> you actually have a lot to learn about cats
>
>> Absolutely. Every day, a bit more. But I am not blind to their
>> needs and nature as you appear to be - OK, perhaps 'blind' is
>> an imprecise word but it is either that or denial.
>
>
> It is not that you have a lot to learn, it is that you are a
> moron.

You claim to think cats are the greatest, JudgeMental, and yet you
pretend to know everything about them. No one can post a familiar
problem without ridicule or insult from you, because "everything
there is to know has already been discussed". But in fact, new
things are learned every day, and the things you think are well
known can change. Besides, JudgeMental, maybe people just want to
talk and enjoy themselves without your insults.

cyberpurrs
August 13th 09, 09:59 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>> > wrote in message
>>> "Matthew" > wrote:
>
>>>> you actually have a lot to learn about cats
>>
>>> Absolutely. Every day, a bit more. But I am not blind to their
>>> needs and nature as you appear to be - OK, perhaps 'blind' is
>>> an imprecise word but it is either that or denial.
>>
>>
>> It is not that you have a lot to learn, it is that you are a
>> moron.
>
> You claim to think cats are the greatest, JudgeMental, and yet you
> pretend to know everything about them. No one can post a familiar
> problem without ridicule or insult from you, because "everything
> there is to know has already been discussed". But in fact, new
> things are learned every day, and the things you think are well
> known can change. Besides, JudgeMental, maybe people just want to
> talk and enjoy themselves without your insults.

Then they, and you, can use a killfile, you sick mother****er.

Cheryl[_3_]
August 13th 09, 10:21 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "John Doe" > wrote in message
> ...
>> This troll, like the patently offensive "cybercat" he defends,
>> uses the pretense "I love cats" as an excuse to insult others here.
>>
>>
>> "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Path:
>>> news.astraweb.com!router1.astraweb.com!news-out.octanews.net!mauve.octanews.net!nx02.iad.newsh osting.com!newshosting.com!69.16.185.51.MISMATCH!t mp-post01.iad!news.highwinds-media.com!not-for-mail
>>> From: "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com>
>>> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>>> References: <6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e
>>> w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com>
>>> Subject: Re: Too young to catch mice?
>>> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:26:48 -0500
>>> X-Priority: 3
>>> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
>>> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.5512
>>> X-MIMEOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.5579
>>> X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
>>> Lines: 22
>>> Message-ID: <49245a56$0$4955$9a6e19ea unlimited.newshosting.com>
>>> Organization: Newshosting.com - Highest quality at a great price!
>>> www.newshosting.com
>>> NNTP-Posting-Host: 72.189.107.90
>>> X-Complaints-To: abuse newshosting.com
>>>
>>> that looks just like my LIMO
>>> <meghanwh gmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e
>>> w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>>>> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>>>> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>>>> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>>>> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>>>> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>>>> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>>>> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>>>> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>>>> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>>>> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>>>> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>>>> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>>>> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>>>> can do to help teach him?
>>>
>>> Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an
>>> exterminator
>>> than stop being a complete idiot
>>>
>>>
>
> Mark, you are responding to a post from November 2008. Save yourself some
> trouble and go back on your meds.
>
Can you believe that post was almost a year ago? Time is moving too fast.

John Doe
August 13th 09, 10:38 PM
I am just reading the group and posting on subjects of interest,
JudgeMental, the stalking thing comes from your big ego.

cybercat
August 13th 09, 11:04 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "John Doe" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> This troll, like the patently offensive "cybercat" he defends,
>>> uses the pretense "I love cats" as an excuse to insult others here.
>>>
>>>
>>> "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Path:
>>>> news.astraweb.com!router1.astraweb.com!news-out.octanews.net!mauve.octanews.net!nx02.iad.newsh osting.com!newshosting.com!69.16.185.51.MISMATCH!t mp-post01.iad!news.highwinds-media.com!not-for-mail
>>>> From: "Matthew" <iamacatslaveand proudtoserve.com>
>>>> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>>>> References: <6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e
>>>> w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com>
>>>> Subject: Re: Too young to catch mice?
>>>> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:26:48 -0500
>>>> X-Priority: 3
>>>> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
>>>> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.5512
>>>> X-MIMEOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.5579
>>>> X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
>>>> Lines: 22
>>>> Message-ID: <49245a56$0$4955$9a6e19ea unlimited.newshosting.com>
>>>> Organization: Newshosting.com - Highest quality at a great price!
>>>> www.newshosting.com
>>>> NNTP-Posting-Host: 72.189.107.90
>>>> X-Complaints-To: abuse newshosting.com
>>>>
>>>> that looks just like my LIMO
>>>> <meghanwh gmail.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:6917db8b-807d-4907-a9c8-d19c5dd0e38e
>>>> w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>>>>> We got a kitten to catch the mice in the house. He's about 12 weeks
>>>>> old or so. The vet has recommended that he stay indoors, so he's not
>>>>> getting any practice hunting outside at all. He loves to chase the
>>>>> laser and play with little foam balls, and we have one of those little
>>>>> mice that hangs on an elastic string that goes over the door that he
>>>>> also loves. The problem is that in the 3 weeks since we got him the
>>>>> mice have apparently gotten much bolder. The other night one ran right
>>>>> by his food dish and this morning a mouse stood up on his hind legs
>>>>> when it saw my roommate! The cat is never around when the mice are,
>>>>> they seem to be coming from behind the stove or under the fridge and
>>>>> he does spend some time sniffing around there and looking around
>>>>> there, but he certainly hasn't chased or caught anything. Is he too
>>>>> young for us to expect him to catch the mice? Or is there anything I
>>>>> can do to help teach him?
>>>>
>>>> Nope but you can take him back to wher you got him and call an
>>>> exterminator
>>>> than stop being a complete idiot
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>> Mark, you are responding to a post from November 2008. Save yourself some
>> trouble and go back on your meds.
>>
> Can you believe that post was almost a year ago? Time is moving too fast.

I know. It's wild. And what kind of whackjob responds to posts this old? A
stalker whackjob.

cybercat
August 13th 09, 11:05 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
>
> I am just reading the group and posting on subjects of interest,
> JudgeMental, the stalking thing comes from your big ego.

We will see what the Houston PD thinks.