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Zy
November 29th 08, 08:29 PM
Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move they've
both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go outside,
at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay confined
to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't necessary
as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
via my loud whistle call.

If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
(invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.

honeybunch
November 29th 08, 11:52 PM
On Nov 29, 3:29*pm, "Zy" > wrote:
> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move they've
> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go outside,
> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay confined
> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't necessary
> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> via my loud whistle call.
>
> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.

I am wondering why your cats can't go outside now for a little while?
What exactly is the problem if they should wander out of your rear
yard? (Note: I am asking Zy this question. No one else need reply.)

Zy
November 30th 08, 12:21 AM
"honeybunch" > wrote in message
...
On Nov 29, 3:29 pm, "Zy" > wrote:
> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move
> they've
> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go
> outside,
> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay
> confined
> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't
> necessary
> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> via my loud whistle call.
>
> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.

I am wondering why your cats can't go outside now for a little while?
What exactly is the problem if they should wander out of your rear
yard? (Note: I am asking Zy this question. No one else need reply.)

Lots of fast-moving vehicular traffic here (only a mile or so from Trenton,
NJ). And there are some low class neighbors that are cause for worry. I'm
uncertain about the disposition of the adults, but there are several
undisciplined youngsters that should be considered harmful; not just to
animals.

When an "action cat" gets freedom outdoors, it can easily put some distance
between itself and its master. Can't be spending 30-40 minutes chasing down
my cat in my neighbor's yards only several minutes after its let outside.

cybercat
November 30th 08, 12:31 AM
"honeybunch" > wrote in message
...
On Nov 29, 3:29 pm, "Zy" > wrote:
> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move
> they've
> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go
> outside,
> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay
> confined
> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't
> necessary
> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> via my loud whistle call.
>
> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.

>I am wondering why your cats can't go outside now for a little while?
>What exactly is the problem if they should wander out of your rear
>yard? (Note: I am asking Zy this question. No one else need reply.)

Guess what, asshole, that's what email is for. If you're to ask a stupid
question in Usenet expect replies from all over the place.

What exactly is the problem? Ever seen a cat run over by a car? Ripped open
by a dog? Then there are parasites and sadistic humans who torture and kill
cats for fun.

cybercat
November 30th 08, 12:37 AM
"Zy" > wrote
> Lots of fast-moving vehicular traffic here (only a mile or so from
> Trenton, NJ). And there are some low class neighbors that are cause for
> worry. I'm uncertain about the disposition of the adults, but there are
> several undisciplined youngsters that should be considered harmful; not
> just to animals.
>

You're very smart. Have you considered one of the outdoor enclosures for
cats? I would still want to be at home when I allowed my cats out in one of
these, but they seem neat. With regard to radio fences, I have never heard
of these used with cats. I just saw one system at Drs. Foster and Smith for
$200. I still would not leave the cats unattended, too many sickos out
there.

If you like to spend time outside reading or such, maybe a harness and long
lead would work for you. Thanks for being a responsible cat person and not
allowing your cat to roam.

Phil P.
November 30th 08, 02:16 AM
"Zy" > wrote in message
...
> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move
they've
> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go
outside,
> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay
confined
> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't
necessary
> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> via my loud whistle call.
>
> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.

One of my neighbors has and invisible fence (that's what they're called). So
far, he's lost 2 dogs to cars and he's working on the third. I don't
recommend them- especially for cats.

Phil

jmc
November 30th 08, 03:08 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Zy exclaimed (11/29/2008 3:29 PM):
> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move they've
> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go outside,
> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay confined
> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't necessary
> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> via my loud whistle call.
>
> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.
>
>

Zy, I know little about the buried cable fences, but I've heard they are
ineffective for cats. Instead, I'd suggest some sort of outdoor
enclosure - you can buy them, or make them yourself.

There's a few options in here:

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/pet_supplies.cfm?c=3261+2053

I've seen the Kittywalk Carnival versions, they're bigger than the
pictures suggest - almost bought one for Meep.

There are also companies that will make them for you, though I don't
know of any offhand.

Some will built really elaborate structures that are accessible by a cat
door in a door - or a window.

Here's one I quite like: http://www.just4cats.com/post5.html from
http://www.just4cats.com/page7.html

They supply the drawings, you build the enclosure.

You are doing the right thing by not letting them outside in suburbia!
Suburbia is a very dangerous place for cats, even if you live on a
cul-de-sac and have good neighbors.

Do you have a deck? Another option might be screening it in - the
self-proclaimed "crazy cat lady" from two doors down has done that.

jmc

James
November 30th 08, 04:02 PM
On Nov 30, 10:08*am, jmc > wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, Zy exclaimed (11/29/2008 3:29 PM):
>
> > Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> > cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move they've
> > both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> > year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go outside,
> > at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay confined
> > to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't necessary
> > as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> > they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> > via my loud whistle call.
>
> > If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> > (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> > willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.
>
> Zy, I know little about the buried cable fences, but I've heard they are
> ineffective for cats. *Instead, I'd suggest some sort of outdoor
> enclosure - you can buy them, or make them yourself.
>
> There's a few options in here:
>
> http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/pet_supplies.cfm?c=3261+2053
>
> I've seen the Kittywalk Carnival versions, they're bigger than the
> pictures suggest - almost bought one for Meep.
>
> There are also companies that will make them for you, though I don't
> know of any offhand.
>
> Some will built really elaborate structures that are accessible by a cat
> door in a door - or a window.
>
> Here's one I quite like: *http://www.just4cats.com/post5.htmlfromhttp://www.just4cats.com/page7.html
>
> They supply the drawings, you build the enclosure.
>
> You are doing the right thing by not letting them outside in suburbia!
> Suburbia is a very dangerous place for cats, even if you live on a
> cul-de-sac and have good neighbors.
>
> Do you have a deck? *Another option might be screening it in - the
> self-proclaimed "crazy cat lady" from two doors down has done that.
>
> jmc

Isn't outdoor enclosure the same as being locked indoors? What's the
point? I thought being outdoors is being able to run around, climb,
dig, and scratch, etc.

jmc
December 1st 08, 02:44 AM
Suddenly, without warning, James exclaimed (11/30/2008 11:02 AM):
> On Nov 30, 10:08 am, jmc > wrote:
>> Suddenly, without warning, Zy exclaimed (11/29/2008 3:29 PM):
>>
>>> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
>>> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move they've
>>> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
>>> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go outside,
>>> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay confined
>>> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't necessary
>>> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
>>> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
>>> via my loud whistle call.
>>> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
>>> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
>>> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.
>> Zy, I know little about the buried cable fences, but I've heard they are
>> ineffective for cats. Instead, I'd suggest some sort of outdoor
>> enclosure - you can buy them, or make them yourself.
>>
>> There's a few options in here:
>>
>> http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/pet_supplies.cfm?c=3261+2053
>>
>> I've seen the Kittywalk Carnival versions, they're bigger than the
>> pictures suggest - almost bought one for Meep.
>>
>> There are also companies that will make them for you, though I don't
>> know of any offhand.
>>
>> Some will built really elaborate structures that are accessible by a cat
>> door in a door - or a window.
>>
>> Here's one I quite like: http://www.just4cats.com/post5.htmlfromhttp://www.just4cats.com/page7.html
>>
>> They supply the drawings, you build the enclosure.
>>
>> You are doing the right thing by not letting them outside in suburbia!
>> Suburbia is a very dangerous place for cats, even if you live on a
>> cul-de-sac and have good neighbors.
>>
>> Do you have a deck? Another option might be screening it in - the
>> self-proclaimed "crazy cat lady" from two doors down has done that.
>>
>> jmc
>
> Isn't outdoor enclosure the same as being locked indoors? What's the
> point? I thought being outdoors is being able to run around, climb,
> dig, and scratch, etc.

Did you look at those enclosures? I think it's also being able to smell
the outside air, feel the breeze, watch the birds and squirrels and
whatever, enjoy the sunshine on their backs...

It's a compromise between the cat's desires and what's safest. Like
fencing off your back yard for your small child. I'm sure the kid would
have a ball running free in the forest, but of course it wouldn't be safe.

My cat often just likes the door to be open a crack, so she can sniff
the outside air.

jmc

December 1st 08, 08:15 PM
On Nov 29, 3:29*pm, "Zy" > wrote:
> Recently moved from a rural home to a suburban home about 1 year ago. My 2
> cats previously had an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Ever since the move they've
> both been bored and depressed while living indoors only. One of them (a 5
> year old) is now unhealthily bony. So I'd like to enable them to go outside,
> at least while I'm also outside with them. However, they must stay confined
> to the rear yard. When we lived in the rural area, a fence wasn't necessary
> as they never wandered outside the expansive property boundaries, and if
> they weren't in close proximity to the house, they would return for dinner
> via my loud whistle call.
>
> If any of you have any experience with those buried cable fence systems
> (invisible; utilizing an electronic cat collar), please remark. I'd be
> willing to obtain a system if it sounds like it could be reliable.

Been there, done that. Our big Maine Coon would twitch as he walked
across the fence - and twitch when he walked back across it. Even with
the "enhanced" (large dog receiver) system and long spikes. He would
_never_ run or jump across the fence, nor would he try to get around
it. He would walk straight down the path to the gate, and straight
through the gate never changing his very moderate pace. I tried the
collar on my fingers to see if it worked - and *YES* *IT* *DID*. So,
don't waste your money. Dogs, on the other hand, exist to please so
they will typically respond to the appropriate collar and spike
combination.

If you are on a busy street without a large amount of safe and more
attractive-to-cats access, an enclosed outdoor area is the only safe
option. More-so than that, it is nearly impossible to overcome a cat's
natural curiosity - they will roam in every direction but the one you
want.

And a cat that does not want to be on a leash will slip a neck collar
nearly instantly and tangle a harness almost as quickly. Go with the
enclosure. A portable screen room (with an attached floor) is an
inexpensive option, or one that can be tied down well enough to
prevent them going under the skirts.

Just keep in mind that they will haunt the doors and attempt to pull
the screens out of windows.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

December 1st 08, 08:31 PM
On Nov 29, 7:31*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:

> What exactly is the problem? Ever seen a cat run over by a car? Ripped open
> by a dog? Then there are parasites and sadistic humans who torture and kill
> cats for fun.

Cat hit by car (fatally): Yes. Person hit by car(fatally): Yes. Dog
hit by car (fatally): Yes.
Ripped open by a dog: No. Dog killed by cat: Yes. Dog permanently
blinded by cat: Yes X2. Dog chased by cat: Too often to mention.
Cat chased by dog: As above.
Cat actually injured by a dog in any way: Never. Not to suggest it
hasn't or wouldn't happen - but I have never experienced it in 56 +
years around cats (and dogs).

Parasites: Just as much chance for exposure inside as out. Most
parasites are flea-born, and immature fleas will go merrily through
the finest window screens. As will a variety of mites. And many other
parasites, spores and bacteria will come right in with your shoes. And
why systemic controls were developed - and are very effective.

Sadistic Humans: Sure. A very real danger if you do not know your
neighbors and your neighborhood. Can't argue with that. But those
sorts of humans are as much a danger to you as to your pets. So you
had best stay at home as well.

You seem to have a real problem with the reality of cats. Again, they
are at the top of the food chain and didn't get there by being passive
parts of the environment. So it is important to recognize their needs
and accomodate them *FULLY*. Where it is patently unsafe for them to
go outside - heavily trafficked streets, crowded neighborhoods, near
industrial sites or even where larger, more effective predators are
common, then something else *MUST* be done. And that can be expensive,
a lot of work, and time-consuming. But just as seeing a tiger in a
small cage can be heartbreaking - the cage may be relatively larger
and the tiger relatively smaller - but it comes to the same thing for
a bored cat. Imagine yourself in Prison - and what you would need to
make that concept bearable - now apply that same logic and intensity
to your cats. Infinite amounts of bad television and popcorn won't
quite cut it.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA