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James Egan
November 30th 08, 05:59 PM
My 16 year old cat Chip was loosing weight, so I took him to the vet about
a year ago, and he was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Pills and liquids
don't work with Chip, so I've been giving him topical tapazole in his ear
once per day. Unfortunately he's still very thin although he eats a great
deal, and is constantly hungry. He really put some Thanksgiving turkey
away! Anyway, someone told me that they had radiation treatments for
their cat, which seem to cure him. Does the radiation treatment have a
high success rate? Is it worth the $1,000? I called my Vet and one other
in the area, and they don't even offer it, so I'd have to find a Vet that
did.

-Thanks

AZ Nomad[_2_]
November 30th 08, 06:27 PM
On Sun, 30 Nov 2008 12:59:41 -0500, James Egan > wrote:
>My 16 year old cat Chip was loosing weight, so I took him to the vet about
>a year ago, and he was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Pills and liquids
>don't work with Chip, so I've been giving him topical tapazole in his ear
>once per day. Unfortunately he's still very thin although he eats a great
>deal, and is constantly hungry. He really put some Thanksgiving turkey
>away! Anyway, someone told me that they had radiation treatments for
>their cat, which seem to cure him. Does the radiation treatment have a
>high success rate? Is it worth the $1,000? I called my Vet and one other
>in the area, and they don't even offer it, so I'd have to find a Vet that
>did.

FYI: The radiation treatment in humans kills off the thyroid gland and
requires artificial thyroid supplements for the rest of one's life.

If your kitty has anything like what I have -- graves's disease --
then it is an autoimmune condition that'll kill off the thryoid gland
on its own. One goes from hyperthyroid to hypothyroid as the disease
runs it's course. In the course of the last 6 years, I lost 40lbs and
4 inches off my waste and it's all back as I've gone from hyper to hypo.
I was offered the radiation treatment but decided to just let it run its
course.

Matthew[_3_]
November 30th 08, 07:42 PM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> My 16 year old cat Chip was loosing weight, so I took him to the vet about
> a year ago, and he was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Pills and liquids
> don't work with Chip, so I've been giving him topical tapazole in his ear
> once per day. Unfortunately he's still very thin although he eats a great
> deal, and is constantly hungry. He really put some Thanksgiving turkey
> away! Anyway, someone told me that they had radiation treatments for
> their cat, which seem to cure him. Does the radiation treatment have a
> high success rate? Is it worth the $1,000? I called my Vet and one other
> in the area, and they don't even offer it, so I'd have to find a Vet that
> did.
>
> -Thanks
>


James my phantom is 14 going on 15 he has the disease he has been being
treated for over the last 1 year by 5mg of methimazole daily. I checked out
the treatment and got advice here. I found out he had when he went nuts
one night. We think he was seeing things. Also do you know that they have
proven that the chemicals we use in the fire retardant of out furniture and
carpets leads to the furballs higher rate of getting this disease. WE
basically are killing are cats.

Here is the deal $1000.00 plus other expenses out of your pocket. My quote
was $1800.00. Your cat stays with them for average 3 to 5 days but up to 2
or more weeks no visits at all. You cat is actually radioactive and it has
to disappear. From my understanding works beautifully A single injection of
Radioiodine (I-131) cures 95%-98% of Feline Hyperthyroidism cases without
any adverse side effects. But also you cat may not qualify for the
treatment. One of the side effects is possible decline in kidney
functions,Hypothyroidism. A very small percentage of treated patients will
have lifelong hypothyroidism. Most cases of hypothyroidism are transient and
resolves within 4 months post-treatment. Sore throat or dysphagia. This is
usually transient but a permanent voice change is possible. . Worsening of
azotemia

I personally elected to give phantom a pill every day. it was not in no
means the money. I can afford that cost simply but the chance of losing
him even a slim chance nope won't do it. I know the medication can cause
problems but it is the route I choose.

Phantom t4 levels are perfect the fat boy has good weight in fact won't
leave the others food alone. Perfect bathroom habits. Pilling is easy a
pill pocket swallow and gone. the medication cost me $30 for a 100 day
supply

Iodine-131
a.. It's the only method that consistently eliminates thyroid tumors - for
good.
b.. It's more cost-effective than drugs or surgery.
c.. There are no harmful side effects.
d.. There is no tissue or organ damage - including the parathyroid glands.
e.. There is no damage to healthy thyroid tissue.
f.. There is no anesthesia required.
g.. There is no daily pilling.
h.. It destroys thyroid tumors wherever they are located.
i.. It returns thyroid function to normal usually within one month.
j.. Experts agree - it's the treatment of choice.
Now compare that with these facts about your past options - medical and
surgical therapies:




Medical Therapy:

a.. Does not cure the disease or kill the thyroid tumors; in fact, the
tumor can keep growing, making medical management less and less effective.
b.. Causes harmful side effects like nausea, vomiting, lethargy, lack of
appetite and hair loss/facial scabbing.
c.. Causes loss of vital white blood cells and blood clotting abilities.
d.. Causes long-term damage to liver and kidneys.
e.. Damages owner-pet relationship by requiring pilling, 1-3 times daily.
f.. Increases the need for blood tests to monitor thyroid hormone levels
and potential side effects.
g.. Costs $500-$700 per year, for the rest of your cat's life.


Surgical Therapy:

a.. Requires anesthesia.
b.. May damage parathyroid glands.
c.. Creates difficulty in identifying/removing the entire tumor.
d.. Leads to persistence of Hyperthyroidism post-surgery (80% of cases
already have another tumor on the opposite side that will become clinically
significant within 1.5 years).
e.. Costs $700-$1300 for one surgery.
f.. Is often performed in two surgeries.
g.. Leaves thyroid tissue in the chest where the tumor can recur.
h.. Leaves many cats still needing I-131 therapy, even after undergoing
one or more surgeries.
After your cat is released, they ask that you spend two weeks using some
basic, common sense safety precautions primarily regarding your cat's litter
box output. The radiation is excreted through the urine and feces, and a
safe level of radioactivity is obtained within 3 to 10 days. You would
probably receive more radiation from an extended flight or a day at the
beach than you'll get from your pet once it's released, so your cat does NOT
need to be isolated from you, your family or other pets. However, your cat
MUST remain indoors. Limiting (not halting) snuggling with your cat and
washing your hands after prolonged close contact is recommended. We'll help
you figure out ways to accommodate these small changes in your daily
routine. The potential risk to owners is extremely remote as regulations for
using I-131 are much stricter for animals than for people, but they
recommend pregnant women not participate in the cat's care during these two
weeks. After two weeks, simply return to your normal pet-care and pet-loving
routine.

Phil P.
November 30th 08, 08:54 PM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> My 16 year old cat Chip was loosing weight, so I took him to the vet about
> a year ago, and he was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Pills and liquids
> don't work with Chip, so I've been giving him topical tapazole in his ear
> once per day. Unfortunately he's still very thin although he eats a great
> deal, and is constantly hungry. He really put some Thanksgiving turkey
> away! Anyway, someone told me that they had radiation treatments for
> their cat, which seem to cure him. Does the radiation treatment have a
> high success rate? Is it worth the $1,000? I called my Vet and one other
> in the area, and they don't even offer it, so I'd have to find a Vet that
> did.
>
> -Thanks

Have your cat's kidney values (BUB & creatinine) remained in the normal
range while he's been on thyroid meds? If so, I-131 radioiodine tx is
definitely an option and well worth the expense. The success rate of the tx
in cats is about 96% with no further medications of any kind needed. Some
cats become hypothyroid after tx, but this is usually transient until the
suppressed normal thyroid tissue becomes functional again. Most cats don't
need hypothyroid tx. After I-131 tx, your cat will have to remain in the
facility for 4-7 days. Each State has their own requirement. My cat had to
stay 96 hours but I was able to spring her after 72.

Hyperthyroidism can mask underlying kidney failure by increasing renal blood
flow. So, before making any decisions, be sure to look at your cat's kidney
values on the original bloodwork from when he was diagnosed with
hyperthyroidism and compare those with his present values. If his kidney
values have gone up while he's been on thyroid meds, then radioiodine tx
would not be a good choice.

Best of luck,

Phil

Buddy's Mom
November 30th 08, 10:23 PM
Your cat is young. If his kidneys test ok, I would go with the
radioiodine. My cat was 18 when diagnosed and it would have probably
killed him to be away from home for that period of time. The pills
kept him alive to 20, but he still had all the symptoms of thirst and
hunger and never gained weight.

I would do the radioiodine in a younger cat for sure!

James Egan
December 1st 08, 02:52 AM
On Sun, 30 Nov 2008 20:54:20 +0000, Phil P. wrote:
> Hyperthyroidism can mask underlying kidney failure by increasing renal blood
> flow. So, before making any decisions, be sure to look at your cat's kidney
> values on the original bloodwork from when he was diagnosed with
> hyperthyroidism and compare those with his present values. If his kidney
> values have gone up while he's been on thyroid meds, then radioiodine tx
> would not be a good choice.
>
> Best of luck,
>
> Phil


I'm a little leery about the radiation and my wife being pregnant. I'll
ask the doctor if there's any risk...

-Thanks

James Egan
December 1st 08, 02:52 AM
On Sun, 30 Nov 2008 14:23:56 -0800, Buddy's Mom wrote:

> Your cat is young. If his kidneys test ok, I would go with the
> radioiodine. My cat was 18 when diagnosed and it would have probably
> killed him to be away from home for that period of time. The pills
> kept him alive to 20, but he still had all the symptoms of thirst and
> hunger and never gained weight.
>
> I would do the radioiodine in a younger cat for sure!


I'm a little leery about the radiation and my wife being pregnant. I'll
ask the doctor if there's any risk...

-Thanks

Phil P.
December 1st 08, 06:13 AM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 30 Nov 2008 20:54:20 +0000, Phil P. wrote:
> > Hyperthyroidism can mask underlying kidney failure by increasing renal
blood
> > flow. So, before making any decisions, be sure to look at your cat's
kidney
> > values on the original bloodwork from when he was diagnosed with
> > hyperthyroidism and compare those with his present values. If his kidney
> > values have gone up while he's been on thyroid meds, then radioiodine tx
> > would not be a good choice.
> >
> > Best of luck,
> >
> > Phil
>
>
> I'm a little leery about the radiation and my wife being pregnant. I'll
> ask the doctor if there's any risk...

You'd be better off speaking with the doctors at the nuclear medicine
facility. Human doctors get more cats killed than some diseases--
especially if a woman in the house is pregnant!

rich
December 4th 08, 11:26 PM
AZ Nomad wrote:
> On Sun, 30 Nov 2008 12:59:41 -0500, James Egan > wrote:
>> My 16 year old cat Chip was loosing weight, so I took him to the vet about
>> a year ago, and he was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Pills and liquids
>> don't work with Chip, so I've been giving him topical tapazole in his ear
>> once per day. Unfortunately he's still very thin although he eats a great
>> deal, and is constantly hungry. He really put some Thanksgiving turkey
>> away! Anyway, someone told me that they had radiation treatments for
>> their cat, which seem to cure him. Does the radiation treatment have a
>> high success rate? Is it worth the $1,000? I called my Vet and one other
>> in the area, and they don't even offer it, so I'd have to find a Vet that
>> did.
>

My Getty has been on Methmazol (SIC?) for several years with 6 month checkups to vary the dose. Very successful, very cheap, I decided to forego the radiation treatment.

Rich

~Cat Lover~
December 5th 08, 10:34 PM
Hi, Jean here....
Here are my thoughts and my opinions.
My cat was diagnosed 4 years ago. He is now 15. Every response you
were given was filled with accurate and useful information.... I may
repeat some of it... but here is my thinking:
IF you did the I-131, and it IS the kidneys (actually because of the
masking) then there is nothing you can do, plus, I called the Chief
Radiologist at Cornell (what better school huh?) and he said it (the
radiation) can/ will still be in the urine for even as much as 3
months).. I had 13 other cats to worry about so I opted not to do the
treatment .. I do the pills. One place I heard of was someone told me
IF your're cat is being treated, they do watch from a distance, but
that person told me that something happened and they didn't do
anything for the pet for fear of contraction..... I don't know to
believe or not-... but throwing it out there.
Good Luck....