PDA

View Full Version : Animal Cruelty: The Key to Serial Minds


December 20th 08, 09:34 AM
What makes a common person a Serial Killer? According to research,
serial killers exhibit what is known as the 'Triad of Warning Signs in
Childhood.'1

Indicators include:

* Firestarting, invariably just for the thrill of destroying things

* Cruelty to Animals: Most children can be cruel to animals, such as
pulling the legs off of spiders, but future serial killers often kill
larger animals, like dogs and cats, and frequently for their solitary
enjoyment rather than to impress peers.

* Bedwetting beyond the age when children normally grow out of such
behavior.

One of society's more notorious serial killers, Jeffrey Dahmer
explained that wanted to remove 'free will' from his victims so that
they would stay with him. In his past, he suffered from abandonment
and was afraid of loss and any social upheaval. Another one of his
extremely displaced characteristics was that he suffered from low self-
esteem. His parents divorced during his teens, and when he did go to
college, he performed badly. Upon examination of three psychologists,
Dahmer was found to be manipulative, resistant and evasive.2 Further
studies of Dahmer revealed that he could not tolerate rejection or
abandonment; and that control was the number one factor for him. One
clue to his unusually sick behavior was that even in his
relationships, Dahmer did not gratify his sexual partners - instead,
Dahmer always expected to be pleased by them.

According to Pat Brown's Book, Killing for Sport: Inside the Minds of
Serial Killers '...serial killers are of average intelligence....most
have low level jobs and make poor decisions. ' And, '...it is exactly
these poor decisions that get them in trouble on their jobs, in their
relationships, and in their crimes.'

Based on studies, serial killers usually choose victims that they can
easily overpower, such as persons having short height and low weight.
Additionally, 'serial killing is not about sex at all, but about power
and control and revenge on society.' 2

Ted Bundy, who murdered at least 36 women, was known for his expressed
desire to acquire things. From theft, to the importance of social
standing, he pined to break free from the working class from which he
was born. Additionally, he 'needed' to possess expensive items as
well. Per research, Ted came from a single-parent home, was a severe
sexual deviate; and women threatened him. He felt the need to not only
control them, but to incapacitate them as well. As a teenager, Ted
Bundy became known for his violent temper.

But what do serial killers like Dahmer, Bundy and others like them
have in common?

'Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Bundy, Andrew Cunanan, David 'Son of Sam'
Berkowitz, and Albert 'Boston Strangler' DeSalvo were ALL cruel to
animals before they started hurting people.'6 Subsequently, killer
teenagers Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold (Columbine HS), and Kip Kinkel
were also known for their past history of animal cruelty. In the study
from of 'The Care of pets within child abusing families,' presented by
DeViney & Lockwood, 88 percent of the homes were animal abuse had
occurred, children were also abused.

In conclusion, I summise this important literature from the San
Francisco Chronicle commentary by Margo DeMello:

"...every time we hear of a young person abusing an animal, it is
explained away by family and often authorities as a 'youthful
indiscrection'...What the authorities and parents of these young men
fail to realize is that their behavior may signal that something is
wrong with these men, which could very easily escalate into something
much worse. The evidence is not just anecdotal; numerous studies,
including the 1998 work of Randall Lockwood and Frank R. Ascione
("Cruelty to Animals and Interpersonal Violence," Purdue University
Press), have shown that children who engage in animal cruelty are more
likely to commit more violent acts as adults. There is also a strong
link between abuse of animals and domestic violence, with animal
abusers much more likely to batter their wives or girlfriends as
well...

Youthful violence toward animals is a very serious issue, and it needs
to be taken seriously by not only animal advocates like myself, but by
those who are concerned about violence in our society." - Margo
DeMello, Ph.D.


Resources:-
http://ezinearticles.com/?Animal-Cruelty:--The-Key-to-Serial-Minds&id=35856
http://www.abbanetwork.com/pets/abuse-cases-against-animals/
https://www.amazines.com/article_detail.cfm/541065?articleid=541065

Average Joe
December 20th 08, 06:45 PM
> wrote in message
...
> What makes a common person a Serial Killer? According to research,
> serial killers exhibit what is known as the 'Triad of Warning Signs in
> Childhood.'1
>
> Indicators include:
>
> * Firestarting, invariably just for the thrill of destroying things
>
> * Cruelty to Animals: Most children can be cruel to animals, such as
> pulling the legs off of spiders, but future serial killers often kill
> larger animals, like dogs and cats, and frequently for their solitary
> enjoyment rather than to impress peers.
>
> * Bedwetting beyond the age when children normally grow out of such
> behavior.
>
> One of society's more notorious serial killers, Jeffrey Dahmer
> explained that wanted to remove 'free will' from his victims so that
> they would stay with him. In his past, he suffered from abandonment
> and was afraid of loss and any social upheaval. Another one of his
> extremely displaced characteristics was that he suffered from low self-
> esteem. His parents divorced during his teens, and when he did go to
> college, he performed badly. Upon examination of three psychologists,
> Dahmer was found to be manipulative, resistant and evasive.2 Further
> studies of Dahmer revealed that he could not tolerate rejection or
> abandonment; and that control was the number one factor for him. One
> clue to his unusually sick behavior was that even in his
> relationships, Dahmer did not gratify his sexual partners - instead,
> Dahmer always expected to be pleased by them.
>
> According to Pat Brown's Book, Killing for Sport: Inside the Minds of
> Serial Killers '...serial killers are of average intelligence....most
> have low level jobs and make poor decisions. ' And, '...it is exactly
> these poor decisions that get them in trouble on their jobs, in their
> relationships, and in their crimes.'
>
> Based on studies, serial killers usually choose victims that they can
> easily overpower, such as persons having short height and low weight.
> Additionally, 'serial killing is not about sex at all, but about power
> and control and revenge on society.' 2
>
> Ted Bundy, who murdered at least 36 women, was known for his expressed
> desire to acquire things. From theft, to the importance of social
> standing, he pined to break free from the working class from which he
> was born. Additionally, he 'needed' to possess expensive items as
> well. Per research, Ted came from a single-parent home, was a severe
> sexual deviate; and women threatened him. He felt the need to not only
> control them, but to incapacitate them as well. As a teenager, Ted
> Bundy became known for his violent temper.
>
> But what do serial killers like Dahmer, Bundy and others like them
> have in common?
>
> 'Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Bundy, Andrew Cunanan, David 'Son of Sam'
> Berkowitz, and Albert 'Boston Strangler' DeSalvo were ALL cruel to
> animals before they started hurting people.'6 Subsequently, killer
> teenagers Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold (Columbine HS), and Kip Kinkel
> were also known for their past history of animal cruelty. In the study
> from of 'The Care of pets within child abusing families,' presented by
> DeViney & Lockwood, 88 percent of the homes were animal abuse had
> occurred, children were also abused.
>
> In conclusion, I summise this important literature from the San
> Francisco Chronicle commentary by Margo DeMello:
>
> "...every time we hear of a young person abusing an animal, it is
> explained away by family and often authorities as a 'youthful
> indiscrection'...What the authorities and parents of these young men
> fail to realize is that their behavior may signal that something is
> wrong with these men, which could very easily escalate into something
> much worse. The evidence is not just anecdotal; numerous studies,
> including the 1998 work of Randall Lockwood and Frank R. Ascione
> ("Cruelty to Animals and Interpersonal Violence," Purdue University
> Press), have shown that children who engage in animal cruelty are more
> likely to commit more violent acts as adults. There is also a strong
> link between abuse of animals and domestic violence, with animal
> abusers much more likely to batter their wives or girlfriends as
> well...
>
> Youthful violence toward animals is a very serious issue, and it needs
> to be taken seriously by not only animal advocates like myself, but by
> those who are concerned about violence in our society." - Margo
> DeMello, Ph.D.
>
>
> Resources:-
> http://ezinearticles.com/?Animal-Cruelty:--The-Key-to-Serial-Minds&id=35856
> http://www.abbanetwork.com/pets/abuse-cases-against-animals/
> https://www.amazines.com/article_detail.cfm/541065?articleid=541065

And a Merry Christmas to you too !

cybercat
December 20th 08, 06:57 PM
"Average Joe" > wrote in message
...
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> What makes a common person a Serial Killer? According to research,
>> serial killers exhibit what is known as the 'Triad of Warning Signs in
>> Childhood.'1
>>
>> Indicators include:
>>
>> * Firestarting, invariably just for the thrill of destroying things
>>
>> * Cruelty to Animals: Most children can be cruel to animals, such as
>> pulling the legs off of spiders, but future serial killers often kill
>> larger animals, like dogs and cats, and frequently for their solitary
>> enjoyment rather than to impress peers.
>>
>> * Bedwetting beyond the age when children normally grow out of such
>> behavior.
>>
>> One of society's more notorious serial killers, Jeffrey Dahmer
>> explained that wanted to remove 'free will' from his victims so that
>> they would stay with him. In his past, he suffered from abandonment
>> and was afraid of loss and any social upheaval. Another one of his
>> extremely displaced characteristics was that he suffered from low self-
>> esteem. His parents divorced during his teens, and when he did go to
>> college, he performed badly. Upon examination of three psychologists,
>> Dahmer was found to be manipulative, resistant and evasive.2 Further
>> studies of Dahmer revealed that he could not tolerate rejection or
>> abandonment; and that control was the number one factor for him. One
>> clue to his unusually sick behavior was that even in his
>> relationships, Dahmer did not gratify his sexual partners - instead,
>> Dahmer always expected to be pleased by them.
>>
>> According to Pat Brown's Book, Killing for Sport: Inside the Minds of
>> Serial Killers '...serial killers are of average intelligence....most
>> have low level jobs and make poor decisions. ' And, '...it is exactly
>> these poor decisions that get them in trouble on their jobs, in their
>> relationships, and in their crimes.'
>>
>> Based on studies, serial killers usually choose victims that they can
>> easily overpower, such as persons having short height and low weight.
>> Additionally, 'serial killing is not about sex at all, but about power
>> and control and revenge on society.' 2
>>
>> Ted Bundy, who murdered at least 36 women, was known for his expressed
>> desire to acquire things. From theft, to the importance of social
>> standing, he pined to break free from the working class from which he
>> was born. Additionally, he 'needed' to possess expensive items as
>> well. Per research, Ted came from a single-parent home, was a severe
>> sexual deviate; and women threatened him. He felt the need to not only
>> control them, but to incapacitate them as well. As a teenager, Ted
>> Bundy became known for his violent temper.
>>
>> But what do serial killers like Dahmer, Bundy and others like them
>> have in common?
>>
>> 'Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Bundy, Andrew Cunanan, David 'Son of Sam'
>> Berkowitz, and Albert 'Boston Strangler' DeSalvo were ALL cruel to
>> animals before they started hurting people.'6 Subsequently, killer
>> teenagers Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold (Columbine HS), and Kip Kinkel
>> were also known for their past history of animal cruelty. In the study
>> from of 'The Care of pets within child abusing families,' presented by
>> DeViney & Lockwood, 88 percent of the homes were animal abuse had
>> occurred, children were also abused.
>>
>> In conclusion, I summise this important literature from the San
>> Francisco Chronicle commentary by Margo DeMello:
>>
>> "...every time we hear of a young person abusing an animal, it is
>> explained away by family and often authorities as a 'youthful
>> indiscrection'...What the authorities and parents of these young men
>> fail to realize is that their behavior may signal that something is
>> wrong with these men, which could very easily escalate into something
>> much worse. The evidence is not just anecdotal; numerous studies,
>> including the 1998 work of Randall Lockwood and Frank R. Ascione
>> ("Cruelty to Animals and Interpersonal Violence," Purdue University
>> Press), have shown that children who engage in animal cruelty are more
>> likely to commit more violent acts as adults. There is also a strong
>> link between abuse of animals and domestic violence, with animal
>> abusers much more likely to batter their wives or girlfriends as
>> well...
>>
>> Youthful violence toward animals is a very serious issue, and it needs
>> to be taken seriously by not only animal advocates like myself, but by
>> those who are concerned about violence in our society." - Margo
>> DeMello, Ph.D.
>>
>>
>> Resources:-
>> http://ezinearticles.com/?Animal-Cruelty:--The-Key-to-Serial-Minds&id=35856
>> http://www.abbanetwork.com/pets/abuse-cases-against-animals/
>> https://www.amazines.com/article_detail.cfm/541065?articleid=541065
>
> And a Merry Christmas to you too !
>
>

lol!!

Sharon[_3_]
December 30th 08, 04:49 AM
In article <2c0fb15a-3848-44ca-b1a8-
>, says...
> What makes a common person a Serial Killer? According to research,
> serial killers exhibit what is known as the 'Triad of Warning Signs in
> Childhood.'1
>
> Indicators include:
>
> * Firestarting, invariably just for the thrill of destroying things

Fire is fun to watch. I think everyone can agree on that.

> * Cruelty to Animals: Most children can be cruel to animals, such as
> pulling the legs off of spiders,

Eh. Most people don't think of creepy crawly bugs as animals.

Yes, they are in the animal kingdom and thus are, in fact, animals. But
your average non-biologist thinks of animals as two or four legged
critters with hair or fur -- not as nasty little things with four eyes
and eight legs.

> but future serial killers often kill larger animals, like

Killing and cruelty are not necessarily the same thing. So which is it
-- are they cruel or do they kill? Or do they cruelly kill?

> dogs and cats, and frequently for their solitary
> enjoyment rather than to impress peers.

So people who work in meat packing plants, where large animals are
killed, are serial killers if they happen to enjoy their jobs? Huh. Do
the authorities know about this???

> * Bedwetting beyond the age when children normally grow out of such
> behavior.

So it's okay to be a pyromaniac cat torturer as long as you didn't pee
the bed past the age of 2 or 3?

Whatta laugh.