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ensoul[_2_]
January 5th 09, 03:43 AM
Moe & Rudy (brothers, neutred, inddor cats) both long hairs (was my
late hubby's ideal...I wanted short hair cats...but I do love....my
first cat had long hair but I've never seen anything like this....my
daughter vacuumed for me yesterday...when I get up the rug will have
wads of fur all over the place and when I pet wads fo fur come off

they don't have blading spots....only Moe will let me use the
furminator and he's the wrose shedder...also the vet gave me a spary
to use, said it wouldn't help in the natural shedding cycle....they
don't have a natural shedding cycle - the shed all year long

I knew they wouldn't go for a spray i warmed a wash cloth that had
been soaked in stuff the vet gave - that was a battle too...but did
get done...remember cats are very strong for there size these 2 are 16
lbs and stand on thier hind legs (which they do often) their height is
32 and that on thier hind legs not full length

I have the Bissel pet Vac which does an amazying job

anything else I can do for the shedding?

lynn

An eye for an eye only leads to more blindness.
~Margaret Atwood

cybercat
January 5th 09, 07:03 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
...
> Moe & Rudy (brothers, neutred, inddor cats) both long hairs (was my
> late hubby's ideal...I wanted short hair cats...but I do love....my
> first cat had long hair but I've never seen anything like this....my
> daughter vacuumed for me yesterday...when I get up the rug will have
> wads of fur all over the place and when I pet wads fo fur come off
>
> they don't have blading spots....only Moe will let me use the
> furminator and he's the wrose shedder...also the vet gave me a spary
> to use, said it wouldn't help in the natural shedding cycle....they
> don't have a natural shedding cycle - the shed all year long
>
> I knew they wouldn't go for a spray i warmed a wash cloth that had
> been soaked in stuff the vet gave - that was a battle too...but did
> get done...remember cats are very strong for there size these 2 are 16
> lbs and stand on thier hind legs (which they do often) their height is
> 32 and that on thier hind legs not full length
>
> I have the Bissel pet Vac which does an amazying job
>
> anything else I can do for the shedding?
>


Brush them????

January 5th 09, 03:20 PM
On Jan 4, 10:43*pm, ensoul > wrote:

> Shedding cats.

If they will not tolerate brushing on a regular basis, and they are
shedding constantly, there are a couple of things that need to be
determined and from that a few things you can do:

a) where are you (by region)? They may be indoor cats, but if the
climate inside your house mirrors the outside climate somewhat, they
will go through their normal winter/summer coat cycle with one major
and one minor shed cycle (along with normal losses) across that
period.

b) has anything changed in their environment recently? Constant
shedding is often an indication of distress - either external (change
in living conditions) or internal - illness or parasites. Fleas can
happen all year, and if you are in a warm climate the immature stages
of fleas will go right through window screens - also ringworm (not a
worm, but a fungus) happens all year and is something that can come in
by several vectors.

c) Maine Coons (large cats) and their mixes will often shed in clumps,
but tend to shed at fairly specific times during the year. When they
shed their winter coat and most of their undercoat that can get
spectacularly messy even if they tolerate brushing. From your
description, you may have Maine Coon mixes.

d) as to brushing, try a simple soft-bristle brush as part of an
'affection routine' so as to get them used to the concept. Then, if
they tolerate that, gradually move to stiffer bristles, perhaps even a
slicker brush. I admit to being highly skeptical of "as seen on TV"
stuff - simple slickers have always been the best and most easily
tolerated brushes for our animals. We brush, and we get at least two
complete animals per week from the vacuum - but that is mostly the
dogs this time of year. The cats make their contributions in the early
spring and very early fall.


Good luck. Be patient.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Claude V. Lucas
January 5th 09, 09:16 PM
In article >,
hopitus > wrote:
>On Jan 5, 12:03 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
>> "ensoul" > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>> > Moe & Rudy (brothers, neutred, inddor cats) both long hairs (was my
>> > late hubby's ideal...I wanted short hair cats...but I do love....my
>> > first cat had long hair but I've never seen anything like this....my
>> > daughter vacuumed for me yesterday...when I get up the rug will have
>> > wads of fur all over the place and when I pet wads fo fur come off
>>
>> > they don't have blading spots....only Moe will let me use the
>> > furminator and he's the wrose shedder...also the vet gave me a spary
>> > to use, said it wouldn't help in the natural shedding cycle....they
>> > don't have a natural shedding cycle - the shed all year long
>>
>> > I knew they wouldn't go for a spray i warmed a wash cloth that had
>> > been soaked in stuff the vet gave - that was a battle too...but did
>> > get done...remember cats are very strong for there size these 2 are 16
>> > lbs and stand on thier hind legs (which they do often) their height is
>> > 32 and that on thier hind legs not full length
>>
>> > I have the Bissel pet Vac which does an amazying job
>>
>> > anything else I can do for the shedding?
>>
>> Brush them????
>
>Yeah, I second this motion. You have to get them used to not only
>that
>brushing is good for them (they could care less) but that it also
>*feels
>good*, like petting with long fingernails....my cats like metal
>bristle
>brushes but that's extreme fir noobie cat brushing; start soft and
>remember, you may be the slave but you are also the cat mama
>and mama knows best.

Lion cut?

cybercat
January 5th 09, 11:38 PM
"Claude V. Lucas" > wrote
>
> Lion cut?

If she is too fragile to brush them, I guess.

cybercat
January 5th 09, 11:41 PM
"hopitus" > wrote in message
...

>> Brush them????
>
> Yeah, I second this motion. You have to get them used to not only
> that
> brushing is good for them (they could care less) but that it also
> *feels
> good*,


I found out how good it feels to them when I just held up my hair brush and
Gracie groomed herself! She is a short-haired tabby, so doesn't exactly
require a lot of grooming, but I brush her several times a week now just
because she blisses out on it. She loves the way the bristles (not too hard,
not too soft, kind of like rubber) feel on her gums too, I guess. It's
pretty funny, she keeps swooping either side of her face on it until she has
almost like a little crest on the back of her neck. Mohawk tabby!

ensoul[_2_]
January 6th 09, 01:43 AM
On Jan 5, 10:20*am, " > wrote:
> On Jan 4, 10:43*pm, ensoul > wrote:
>
> > Shedding cats.
>
> If they will not tolerate brushing on a regular basis, and they are
> shedding constantly, there are a couple of things that need to be
> determined and from that a few things you can do:
>
> a) where are you (by region)? They may be indoor cats, but if the
> climate inside your house mirrors the outside climate somewhat, they
> will go through their normal winter/summer coat cycle with one major
> and one minor shed cycle (along with normal losses) across that
> period.

I live in rural upsate NY, we get all the seasons - winters are often
long
>
> b) has anything changed in their environment recently? Constant
> shedding is often an indication of distress - either external (change
> in living conditions) or internal - illness or parasites. Fleas can
> happen all year, and if you are in a warm climate the immature stages
> of fleas will go right through window screens - also ringworm (not a
> worm, but a fungus) happens all year and is something that can come in
> by several vectors.
>
no changes - it was 2 1/2 yrs ago my husband died but they have always
shedded like this

> c) Maine Coons (large cats) and their mixes will often shed in clumps,
> but tend to shed at fairly specific times during the year. When they
> shed their winter coat and most of their undercoat that can get
> spectacularly messy even if they tolerate brushing. From your
> description, you may have Maine Coon mixes.

I've seen pictures of Main Coon cats they no resembalnce (spelling) at
all to that breed
>
> d) as to brushing, try a simple soft-bristle brush as part of an
> 'affection routine' so as to get them used to the concept. Then, if
> they tolerate that, gradually move to stiffer bristles, perhaps even a
> slicker brush. I admit to being highly skeptical of "as seen on TV"
> stuff - simple slickers have always been the best and most easily
> tolerated brushes for our animals. We brush, and we get at least two
> complete animals per week from the vacuum - but that is mostly the
> dogs this time of year. The cats make their contributions in the early
> spring and very early fall.
>
> Good luck. Be patient.
>
> Peter Wieck
> Melrose Park, PA

than you, Peter

cybercat
January 6th 09, 01:50 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 5, 10:20 am, " > wrote:
> On Jan 4, 10:43 pm, ensoul > wrote:
>
> > Shedding cats.
>
> If they will not tolerate brushing on a regular basis, and they are
> shedding constantly, there are a couple of things that need to be
> determined and from that a few things you can do:
>
> a) where are you (by region)? They may be indoor cats, but if the
> climate inside your house mirrors the outside climate somewhat, they
> will go through their normal winter/summer coat cycle with one major
> and one minor shed cycle (along with normal losses) across that
> period.

I live in rural upsate NY, we get all the seasons - winters are often
long
>
> b) has anything changed in their environment recently? Constant
> shedding is often an indication of distress - either external (change
> in living conditions) or internal - illness or parasites. Fleas can
> happen all year, and if you are in a warm climate the immature stages
> of fleas will go right through window screens - also ringworm (not a
> worm, but a fungus) happens all year and is something that can come in
> by several vectors.
>
no changes - it was 2 1/2 yrs ago my husband died but they have always
shedded like this

> c) Maine Coons (large cats) and their mixes will often shed in clumps,
> but tend to shed at fairly specific times during the year. When they
> shed their winter coat and most of their undercoat that can get
> spectacularly messy even if they tolerate brushing. From your
> description, you may have Maine Coon mixes.

I've seen pictures of Main Coon cats they no resembalnce (spelling) at
all to that breed
>
> d) as to brushing, try a simple soft-bristle brush as part of an
> 'affection routine' so as to get them used to the concept. Then, if
> they tolerate that, gradually move to stiffer bristles, perhaps even a
> slicker brush. I admit to being highly skeptical of "as seen on TV"
> stuff - simple slickers have always been the best and most easily
> tolerated brushes for our animals. We brush, and we get at least two
> complete animals per week from the vacuum - but that is mostly the
> dogs this time of year. The cats make their contributions in the early
> spring and very early fall.
>
> Good luck. Be patient.
>
> Peter Wieck
> Melrose Park, PA

>than you, Peter

I'm just going to have to kill file you too. What kind of lameass can't
figure out that her cats need to be brushed? Ugh.

ensoul[_2_]
January 6th 09, 01:51 AM
On Jan 5, 6:41*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "hopitus" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> >> Brush them????
>
> > Yeah, I second this motion. You have to get them used to not only
> > that
> > brushing is good for them (they could care less) but that it also
> > *feels
> > good*,
>
> I found out how good it feels to them when I just held up my hair brush and
> Gracie groomed herself! She is a short-haired tabby, so doesn't exactly
> require a lot of grooming, but I brush her several times a week now just
> because she blisses out on it. She loves the way the bristles (not too hard,
> not too soft, kind of like rubber) feel on her gums too, I guess. It's
> pretty funny, she keeps swooping either side of her face on it until she has
> almost like a little crest on the back of her neck. Mohawk tabby!

only Moe allows the brushing and I live alone...cats are naturally
strong animals and given they're size...I have tried using cat treats
every time after they're brushed, they don't like any type of cat
treats! About 2 summers ago their fur was so terribly matted & I
couldn't afford a groomer, called the SPCA (I gotten them from there)
made a donation and they were happy to do it....afterwards they were
at war...I don't mean rough & tumble play, this was out & out attacks
on each other, they drew blood...I took turns keeping them in seperate
rooms, tried rubbing a T-shirt I wore so they'd have my scent on them,
didn't work....it was 3 month before they went back to normal

ensoul

Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity.
~George Carlin

honeybunch
January 6th 09, 03:11 AM
On Jan 5, 8:51*pm, ensoul > wrote:
> On Jan 5, 6:41*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>
>
> > "hopitus" > wrote in message
>
> ....
>
> > >> Brush them????
>
> > > Yeah, I second this motion. You have to get them used to not only
> > > that
> > > brushing is good for them (they could care less) but that it also
> > > *feels
> > > good*,
>
> > I found out how good it feels to them when I just held up my hair brush and
> > Gracie groomed herself! She is a short-haired tabby, so doesn't exactly
> > require a lot of grooming, but I brush her several times a week now just
> > because she blisses out on it. She loves the way the bristles (not too hard,
> > not too soft, kind of like rubber) feel on her gums too, I guess. It's
> > pretty funny, she keeps swooping either side of her face on it until she has
> > almost like a little crest on the back of her neck. Mohawk tabby!
>
> only Moe allows the brushing and I live alone...cats are naturally
> strong animals and given they're size...I have tried using cat treats
> every time after they're brushed, they don't like any type of cat
> treats! *About 2 summers ago their fur was so terribly matted & I
> couldn't afford a groomer, called the SPCA (I gotten them from there)
> made a donation and they were happy to do it....afterwards they were
> at war...I don't mean rough & tumble play, this was out & out attacks
> on each other, they drew blood...I took turns keeping them in seperate
> rooms, tried rubbing a T-shirt I wore so they'd have my scent on them,
> didn't work....it was 3 month before they went back to normal
>
> ensoul
>
> Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity.
> * * ~George Carlin

Maybe Moe and his brother are not house cats. Are you sure they are
cats? They could be some kind of wild things like bob cats or
something. The way you describe them they sound kinda scary. Have
they ever turned on you? If the two of them jumped you at the same
time, it sounds like youd be dead. Have they ever been mean to you?

MaryL
January 6th 09, 08:49 PM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
...
> Moe & Rudy (brothers, neutred, inddor cats) both long hairs (was my
> late hubby's ideal...I wanted short hair cats...but I do love....my
> first cat had long hair but I've never seen anything like this....my
> daughter vacuumed for me yesterday...when I get up the rug will have
> wads of fur all over the place and when I pet wads fo fur come off
>
> they don't have blading spots....only Moe will let me use the
> furminator and he's the wrose shedder...also the vet gave me a spary
> to use, said it wouldn't help in the natural shedding cycle....they
> don't have a natural shedding cycle - the shed all year long
>
> I knew they wouldn't go for a spray i warmed a wash cloth that had
> been soaked in stuff the vet gave - that was a battle too...but did
> get done...remember cats are very strong for there size these 2 are 16
> lbs and stand on thier hind legs (which they do often) their height is
> 32 and that on thier hind legs not full length
>
> I have the Bissel pet Vac which does an amazying job
>
> anything else I can do for the shedding?
>
> lynn
>
> An eye for an eye only leads to more blindness.
> ~Margaret Atwood
>

In addition to brushing (and long-haired cats need a *great deal* of
brushing--which both you and they might learn to enjoy), what type of food
are you using? If you are using dry cat food, eliminate that and start
using a premium grain-free canned food. That will often do wonders for the
quality a cat's fur (and general health).

MaryL

MaryL
January 6th 09, 08:54 PM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 5, 6:41 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "hopitus" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> >> Brush them????
>
> > Yeah, I second this motion. You have to get them used to not only
> > that
> > brushing is good for them (they could care less) but that it also
> > *feels
> > good*,
>
> I found out how good it feels to them when I just held up my hair brush
> and
> Gracie groomed herself! She is a short-haired tabby, so doesn't exactly
> require a lot of grooming, but I brush her several times a week now just
> because she blisses out on it. She loves the way the bristles (not too
> hard,
> not too soft, kind of like rubber) feel on her gums too, I guess. It's
> pretty funny, she keeps swooping either side of her face on it until she
> has
> almost like a little crest on the back of her neck. Mohawk tabby!

only Moe allows the brushing and I live alone...cats are naturally
strong animals and given they're size...I have tried using cat treats
every time after they're brushed, they don't like any type of cat
treats! About 2 summers ago their fur was so terribly matted & I
couldn't afford a groomer, called the SPCA (I gotten them from there)
made a donation and they were happy to do it....afterwards they were
at war...I don't mean rough & tumble play, this was out & out attacks
on each other, they drew blood...I took turns keeping them in seperate
rooms, tried rubbing a T-shirt I wore so they'd have my scent on them,
didn't work....it was 3 month before they went back to normal

ensoul

I just posted a response in which brushing was one of my suggestions.

Sorry...but, despite any difficulties you may face in brushing, that is what
is required to manage the "fur problem" you described. Have you tried
keeping a brush handy where you sit and then brush just a small amount at a
time? It could be while the cat is in your lap, or if these are not lap
cats, then when you are sitting beside them on the sofa or floor or wherever
you spend time with them. If they object brushing as strongly as you say,
then you need to do it a little at a time. Try a variety of types of
brushes to find one that they will accept.

MaryL

jmc
January 6th 09, 11:55 PM
Suddenly, without warning, ensoul exclaimed (1/4/2009 10:43 PM):
> Moe & Rudy (brothers, neutred, inddor cats) both long hairs (was my
> late hubby's ideal...I wanted short hair cats...but I do love....my
> first cat had long hair but I've never seen anything like this....my
> daughter vacuumed for me yesterday...when I get up the rug will have
> wads of fur all over the place and when I pet wads fo fur come off
>
> they don't have blading spots....only Moe will let me use the
> furminator and he's the wrose shedder...also the vet gave me a spary
> to use, said it wouldn't help in the natural shedding cycle....they
> don't have a natural shedding cycle - the shed all year long
>
> I knew they wouldn't go for a spray i warmed a wash cloth that had
> been soaked in stuff the vet gave - that was a battle too...but did
> get done...remember cats are very strong for there size these 2 are 16
> lbs and stand on thier hind legs (which they do often) their height is
> 32 and that on thier hind legs not full length
>
> I have the Bissel pet Vac which does an amazying job
>
> anything else I can do for the shedding?
>
> lynn
>
> An eye for an eye only leads to more blindness.
> ~Margaret Atwood
>

Brush them daily, and if they're on dry food, switch 'em to wet food.
Did wonders for Meep's shedding issues.

jmc

ensoul[_2_]
January 7th 09, 04:29 AM
On Jan 6, 6:55*pm, jmc > wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, ensoul exclaimed (1/4/2009 10:43 PM):
>
>
>
>
>
> > Moe & Rudy (brothers, neutred, inddor cats) both long hairs (was my
> > late hubby's ideal...I wanted short hair cats...but I do love....my
> > first cat had long hair but I've never seen anything like this....my
> > daughter vacuumed for me yesterday...when I get up the rug will have
> > wads of fur all over the place and when I pet wads fo fur come off
>
> > they don't have blading spots....only Moe will let me use the
> > furminator and he's the wrose shedder...also the vet gave me a spary
> > to use, said it wouldn't help in the natural shedding cycle....they
> > don't have a natural shedding cycle - the shed all year long
>
> > I knew they wouldn't go for a spray i warmed a wash cloth that had
> > been soaked in stuff the vet gave - that was a battle too...but did
> > get done...remember cats are very strong for there size these 2 are 16
> > lbs and stand on thier hind legs (which they do often) their height is
> > 32 and that on thier hind legs not full length
>
> > I have the Bissel pet Vac which does an amazying job
>
> > anything else I can do for the shedding?
>
> > lynn
>
> > An eye for an eye only leads to more blindness.
> > * * * *~Margaret Atwood
>
> Brush them daily, and if they're on dry food, switch 'em to wet food.
> Did wonders for Meep's shedding issues.
>
> jmc- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I keep a brush near where I sit, the furminator Moe lets me use that
one and a soft brush....the secone Rudy see's any brush he's off and
running...have even wiated until he falls asleep in my lap, sweet talk
just a few seconds of brushing and off he goes again...they are on dry
& canned food...1/2 can in am...1/2 can in pm per cat plus1/2 cup dry

Magdalena Cano Plewinska
January 8th 09, 12:19 AM
On Mon, 5 Jan 2009 19:11:14 -0800 (PST), honeybunch
> wrote:

>Maybe Moe and his brother are not house cats. Are you sure they are
>cats? They could be some kind of wild things like bob cats or
>something. The way you describe them they sound kinda scary. Have
>they ever turned on you? If the two of them jumped you at the same
>time, it sounds like youd be dead. Have they ever been mean to you?

Shame on you, honeybunch! Lynn is doing the best she can and she's
asking for help, not sarcasm.

Lynn, I had a cat like that. He was a big boy, had a tendency to mat
and hated having the mats touched. I imagine someone must have hurt
him in the past going after those mats.

Unfortunately, if you can't live with the shedding, your options are
either brushing on a regular basis or shaving. I used to have Fluff's
tummy shaved every few months, since that's where his mats were. I did
get him a lion cut once. He was a red and white cat and actually
looked pretty good with it, in a hilarious sort of way, but it was a
bit much. The cat didn't mind but I missed his bright red coat and all
the neighbors thought I was nuts :) No mats for a good six months,
though.

Of the four I have in the house now, each one approaches brushing
differently. Bassie adores it; she practically throws herself at the
brush. Little Bit is suspicious but puts up with it. Rufus has to be
in the mood. Frangi is OK with it but she would really rather attack
my hand. My mother's kitty, Zabi, demanded to have his hair brushed
whenever I brushed mine when I was there for Christmas.

You mentioned the furminator. That's a great tool but there are other
types of brushes that your cats may prefer. They may not like the feel
of the furminator. The metal tines may be hurting their skin. Maybe
you should try a rubber brush. It doesn't remove as much hair but your
cats might be more inclined to let you use it. I've also seen a rubber
mat with lots of rubber "teeth" that you nail to a wall and let the
cats rub themselves against it. You might start with some of these and
work your way back to the furminator or a brush with metal tines (the
ones with little balls at the tip of the tines won't scratch kitty's
skin).

With mats, I've always found the easiest thing is to just cut them off
with scissors. You do need to be very careful not to cut the skin off.
I find that if I cut off the top half of the mat, the rest of it works
itself apart in a day or two.

Hope that helps,


Magda

--
Magdalena Plewinska
Miami, FL, USA

Janet
January 8th 09, 02:40 PM
Magdalena Cano Plewinska wrote:
> You mentioned the furminator. That's a great tool but there are other
> types of brushes that your cats may prefer. They may not like the feel
> of the furminator. The metal tines may be hurting their skin.

I too have a long-haired cat--people think she's probably part Maine Coon. I
use the furminator on her, and my observation is that the tines don't appear
to be getting down to the skin or near it. She puts up with it, although I
have to keep a firm hold on her and she keeps up a certain degree of yowling
complaint the entire time. <G> Same deal with cutting her nails.

MaryL
January 8th 09, 03:27 PM
"Janet" > wrote in message
...
> Magdalena Cano Plewinska wrote:
>> You mentioned the furminator. That's a great tool but there are other
>> types of brushes that your cats may prefer. They may not like the feel
>> of the furminator. The metal tines may be hurting their skin.
>
> I too have a long-haired cat--people think she's probably part Maine Coon.
> I use the furminator on her, and my observation is that the tines don't
> appear to be getting down to the skin or near it. She puts up with it,
> although I have to keep a firm hold on her and she keeps up a certain
> degree of yowling complaint the entire time. <G> Same deal with cutting
> her nails.
>

Have you tried the Zoom Groom? It gets an amazing amount of fur, and many
cats really like it.
http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2750594
http://www.petfooddirect.com/store/product_detail.asp?pf%5Fid=3125604&dept%5Fid=358&brand%5Fid=80

MaryL

Janet
January 8th 09, 04:07 PM
MaryL wrote:
> "Janet" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Magdalena Cano Plewinska wrote:
>>> You mentioned the furminator. That's a great tool but there are
>>> other types of brushes that your cats may prefer. They may not like
>>> the feel of the furminator. The metal tines may be hurting their
>>> skin.
>>
>> I too have a long-haired cat--people think she's probably part Maine
>> Coon. I use the furminator on her, and my observation is that the
>> tines don't appear to be getting down to the skin or near it. She
>> puts up with it, although I have to keep a firm hold on her and she
>> keeps up a certain degree of yowling complaint the entire time. <G>
>> Same deal with cutting her nails.
>>
>
> Have you tried the Zoom Groom? It gets an amazing amount of fur, and
> many cats really like it.
> http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2750594
> http://www.petfooddirect.com/store/product_detail.asp?pf%5Fid=3125604&dept%5Fid=358&brand%5Fid=80
>
> MaryL

I had something similar to that for the dogs. Didn't work at all well on a
double-coated dog. The Furminator works just fine. She complains no matter
what kind of brush I use. <G>

cshenk
January 8th 09, 06:55 PM
"Magdalena Cano Plewinska" wrote
> honeybunch wrote:


>>Maybe Moe and his brother are not house cats. Are you sure they are
>>cats? They could be some kind of wild things like bob cats or
>>something. The way you describe them they sound kinda scary. Have
>>they ever turned on you? If the two of them jumped you at the same
>>time, it sounds like youd be dead. Have they ever been mean to you?
>
> Shame on you, honeybunch! Lynn is doing the best she can and she's
> asking for help, not sarcasm.

I had to laugh at that though! I once adopted a cat, that turned out to be
1/2 bobcat. Sweet fellow. Lapkitty of the larger sort. Purred like
thunder.

> Lynn, I had a cat like that. He was a big boy, had a tendency to mat
> and hated having the mats touched. I imagine someone must have hurt
> him in the past going after those mats.

Bobby (hey, vet thought the name Hilarious once he realized I didnt know he
was 1/2 bobcat) was like that. He'd never been hurt by other than me trying
to get the mats out and i took real fast to just having him barbered at the
belly.

First time i took him in for a haircut, they were a little scared til I
told'em he *loves* bubble baths and the hardest part is getting him back
out. Also that he knew 3 commands. Up, Down, and Tummy Rub (his favorite).

Sneaky fellow saw the bubble bath and jumped in and all was well after that.
They had to drain it though to get him to come back out ;-) He simply
refused to accept 'up' with all them lovely bubbles til they were whisked
away.

Came time to dry him off, just patted the table and said 'tummy rub' and he
was up there in a flash, rolled over and purring.

Magdalena Cano Plewinska
January 10th 09, 05:42 AM
On Thu, 8 Jan 2009 09:40:07 -0500, "Janet" >
wrote:

>I too have a long-haired cat--people think she's probably part Maine Coon.

So's my Bassie, though her hair is medium-length, but it has the thick
undercoat described in Maine Coons.

>I use the furminator on her, and my observation is that the tines don't appear
>to be getting down to the skin or near it.

Same with Bassie.

>She puts up with it, although I
>have to keep a firm hold on her and she keeps up a certain degree of yowling
>complaint the entire time.

Bassie loves, loves, loves being brushed with anything. She moves
around making sure I get every part of her.

> Same deal with cutting her nails.

Cutting nails in not her favorite, though she's pretty patient about
it. She gets a treat afterwards. I've been discovering recently that
each cats has a position it does best with. I trim Bassie's nails
holding her in my lap in tummy-up but with her thorax vertical, sort
of the way you's hold a baby. She does OK with that. But if I try that
with Frangi, I get a huge fight. She likes to be feet-down. A sharp
cutter is better. Even if you don't cut into the quick, I think they
find the compression of the nail unpleasant, maybe even painful, and a
very sharp blade doesn't compress as much. And if you give them a
treat after doing unpleasant but necessary stuff, they tend to have a
much better attitude next time.
--
Magdalena Plewinska
Miami, FL, USA
klon at bassarella dot net

ensoul[_2_]
January 14th 09, 02:20 AM
On Jan 5, 10:11*pm, honeybunch > wrote:
> On Jan 5, 8:51*pm, ensoul > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Jan 5, 6:41*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>
> Maybe Moe and his brother are not house cats. *Are you sure they are
> cats? *They could be some kind of wild things like bob cats or
> something. *The way you describe them they sound kinda scary. *Have
> they ever turned on you? *If the two of them jumped you at the same
> time, it sounds like youd be dead. *Have they ever been mean to you?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

they're long hair orange tabby's snd have never turned on me...my
daughter's cat, Atals look like a minture Maine Coon's and he bites,
though has never broken the skin unless my son-in-law plays rough with
them

Moe & Ruddy have never been mean to me, closed thing was when Rudy got
a sharp No from me he was trying to get my toast, he gave me quick
swat w/his paw didn't even leave a mark...Rudy doesn't like young kids
at all while Moe loves everybody

ensoul