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View Full Version : Is radio iodine procedure for 16 year old cat recommended?


James Egan
January 6th 09, 04:46 AM
My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?

-Thanks

cybercat
January 6th 09, 05:15 AM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>

Your vet will be able to tell you much better than anyone here. It depends
on your cat's general health. The procedure is not hard on the cat at
all--just the separation from his humans. Because he is radioactive, (his
waste, actually) he will need to be kept at the vet for a while, how long
depends on your state. You really do need to talk to your vet. There are too
many variables here.

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 05:17 AM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>
> -Thanks
>

James I have a 15 year old cat to me I have elected not to do it unless
the medicine stops working. I don't like the fact that for a week to 10
days your cat is radioactive. The money is not a factor in my
determination but the possible side effects that could happen.

But from what I understand their are minimal side effects and that it has
a extremely high success rate.

My phantom is a healthier eater can get him to stop he eats everyone food
that he has diarrhea but he has done that since he was a kitten and nothing
has worked to fix it.

Spot[_2_]
January 6th 09, 06:05 AM
If he has constant diarhea are you sure it's not a food allergy. I had a
cat who kept getting diarheaa and we put her on Natural Balance Allergy food
and for the first time in 6 months she's had normal stools. In fact I
switched all three of my cats to it. They eat less now because they are
satisfied and don't have awful smelling poop.

Celeste


--
Save 25% or more on your eBayŽ auctions
Snipe eBay Auctions with Bidnip
http://www.bidnip.com/a.php?id=39019

"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
>
> "James Egan" > wrote in message
> ...
>> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
>> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
>> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
>> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
>> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this
>> with
>> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
>> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
>> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>>
>> -Thanks
>>
>
> James I have a 15 year old cat to me I have elected not to do it unless
> the medicine stops working. I don't like the fact that for a week to 10
> days your cat is radioactive. The money is not a factor in my
> determination but the possible side effects that could happen.
>
> But from what I understand their are minimal side effects and that it
> has a extremely high success rate.
>
> My phantom is a healthier eater can get him to stop he eats everyone
> food that he has diarrhea but he has done that since he was a kitten and
> nothing has worked to fix it.
>

MaryL
January 6th 09, 09:59 AM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...

I have a friend who has had radioactive iodine done for several of her cats
over the years, so I sent her this post and she said it was okay to post her
reply. Her response is interleaved within your post.

> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease.

Transdermal tapazole is not the best option as absorption is not consistent.
If there is any way to do pills for your kitty it would be much better. If
you haven't tried Pill Pockets that might be a viable way to get him to take
the pills. It sounds like your cat is not getting the correct dose, and it
is imperative you get him to the vet ASAP and get bloodwork and a T4 run to
see what adjustments need to be made. If you are not feeding him good
quality, grain-free canned food (Wellness grain free flavors are an
excellent option) you need to work on this and eliminate any dry food so
that your cat is better hydrated. You can read why here:
http://www.catinfo.org

>I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>
Not at all. I have two cats that received radioactive iodine at 16 years
old. They are now 18.5 years old and doing extremely well. You do need to
keep in mind that hyperthyroid often masks kidney failure, so if the
radioactive iodine is done, you need to monitor the kidney values and then
treat as necessary. I have had 3 cats successfully treated in the last 9
years and if you can afford it and your cat is in otherwise good health, I
don't see any reason not to.
>
> -Thanks
>

MaryL

..

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 03:45 PM
We have been to 3 vets 2 specialist every food out there has been used.
Phantom eats no matter if he is hungry or not. There is dry food but he
does not touch it. HE eats all the left overs of the wet food to the point
where I have to close the door to let the girls eat.
His hyperthyroidism is under control. HE has done this since he was a
kitten. He eats and has to check everyone dishes and eats some of theirs.
I STRESS AGAIN HE HAS DONE THIS FOR 15 PLUS YEARS. HE HAS BEEN TESTED FOR
EVERYTHING.

But thank you for anyone's concern.



"Spot" > wrote in message
...
> If he has constant diarhea are you sure it's not a food allergy. I had a
> cat who kept getting diarheaa and we put her on Natural Balance Allergy
> food and for the first time in 6 months she's had normal stools. In fact
> I switched all three of my cats to it. They eat less now because they are
> satisfied and don't have awful smelling poop.
>
> Celeste
>
>
> --
> Save 25% or more on your eBayŽ auctions
> Snipe eBay Auctions with Bidnip
> http://www.bidnip.com/a.php?id=39019
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> g.com...
>>
>> "James Egan" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
>>> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
>>> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
>>> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is
>>> constantly
>>> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this
>>> with
>>> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he
>>> seems
>>> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
>>> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>>>
>>> -Thanks
>>>
>>
>> James I have a 15 year old cat to me I have elected not to do it unless
>> the medicine stops working. I don't like the fact that for a week to 10
>> days your cat is radioactive. The money is not a factor in my
>> determination but the possible side effects that could happen.
>>
>> But from what I understand their are minimal side effects and that it
>> has a extremely high success rate.
>>
>> My phantom is a healthier eater can get him to stop he eats everyone
>> food that he has diarrhea but he has done that since he was a kitten and
>> nothing has worked to fix it.
>>
>
>

January 6th 09, 04:19 PM
On Jan 6, 9:45*am, "Matthew" > wrote:

> >> My phantom *is a healthier eater *can get him to stop *he eats everyone
> >> food that he has diarrhea *but he has done that since he was a kitten and
> >> nothing has worked to fix it.

Just a wild thought - we had a cat once with the same problem, with
the same Vet results until he was about 4 years old. Then a sweet-
little-old-lady neighbor and certified wild-animal rescue expert
upstate suggested a tiny bit of powdered pectin scattered in his food.
Problem solved. He is now 13 and as "regular" as they come. We stopped
the pectin when he was about age 10 to see if it was still necessary,
the problem did not come back.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Sharon[_3_]
January 6th 09, 05:09 PM
In article >, jegan472
@comcast.net says...
> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?

Meh. As animals age they get sick more and more, and staying on top of
it becomes very expensive and time consuming. If it were me I'd
probably just let him go, considering his age, because after that's
cured he's probably just going to come down with something else. Saying
goodbye will be sad, but if he's 16 then he's probably going to go real
soon (within a couple years) anyway. Grab the classified ads and find
somebody with unwanted kittens 8-10 weeks old; grab one of those and
keep it for another 16 years.

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 05:37 PM
I will have to ask the vet about that. He is due for blood work after I
come back from Vacation. So I will check it out. Thank you Peter


> wrote in message
...
On Jan 6, 9:45 am, "Matthew" > wrote:

> >> My phantom is a healthier eater can get him to stop he eats everyone
> >> food that he has diarrhea but he has done that since he was a kitten
> >> and
> >> nothing has worked to fix it.

Just a wild thought - we had a cat once with the same problem, with
the same Vet results until he was about 4 years old. Then a sweet-
little-old-lady neighbor and certified wild-animal rescue expert
upstate suggested a tiny bit of powdered pectin scattered in his food.
Problem solved. He is now 13 and as "regular" as they come. We stopped
the pectin when he was about age 10 to see if it was still necessary,
the problem did not come back.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 05:43 PM
"Sharon" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, jegan472
> @comcast.net says...
>> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
>> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
>> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
>> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
>> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this
>> with
>> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
>> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
>> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>
> Meh. As animals age they get sick more and more, and staying on top of
> it becomes very expensive and time consuming. If it were me I'd
> probably just let him go, considering his age, because after that's
> cured he's probably just going to come down with something else. Saying
> goodbye will be sad, but if he's 16 then he's probably going to go real
> soon (within a couple years) anyway. Grab the classified ads and find
> somebody with unwanted kittens 8-10 weeks old; grab one of those and
> keep it for another 16 years.

WTF are you thinking. I have had cats live well past 20 years of age and so
have many others here.
They are worth every penny to keep on top of them.

saving the kittens is a noble thing but letting your goes just because he
is sick now Man Please don't offer me any advice

MaryL
January 6th 09, 06:20 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
ng.com...
>
> "Sharon" > wrote in message
> ...
>> In article >, jegan472
>> @comcast.net says...
>>> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
>>> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
>>> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
>>> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is
>>> constantly
>>> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this
>>> with
>>> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he
>>> seems
>>> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
>>> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>>
>> Meh. As animals age they get sick more and more, and staying on top of
>> it becomes very expensive and time consuming. If it were me I'd
>> probably just let him go, considering his age, because after that's
>> cured he's probably just going to come down with something else. Saying
>> goodbye will be sad, but if he's 16 then he's probably going to go real
>> soon (within a couple years) anyway. Grab the classified ads and find
>> somebody with unwanted kittens 8-10 weeks old; grab one of those and
>> keep it for another 16 years.
>
> WTF are you thinking. I have had cats live well past 20 years of age and
> so have many others here.
> They are worth every penny to keep on top of them.
>
> saving the kittens is a noble thing but letting your goes just because he
> is sick now Man Please don't offer me any advice
>

I have noticed a number of people on this group who refer to their cats as
"elderly" and act as if we should end all treatment when they reach "old
age." A recent message even referred to a cat that was only 12 years old as
if she were at the end of her life. (Holly will be 14 in June, and she
still looks and acts like a young cat. My first cat was almost 20 when he
died, and he had been completely healthy until 18 1/2.) Quality of life is
what is important, not simply the totality of years. Just like human
medicine, veterinary medicine has advanced so that cats today can live much
longer--and healthier--lives.

I really wonder if this message wasn't a troll, based on the statement to
"grab the classified ads" and find a kitten. The cat in question is still
alive, and hyperthyroidism is treatable!

As for the OP: *Why* haven't you discussed this with your vet? That is the
obvious (and immediate) step that needs to be taken.

MaryL

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 06:33 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
. ..
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> ng.com...
>>
>> "Sharon" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> In article >, jegan472
>>> @comcast.net says...
>>>> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio
>>>> iodine
>>>> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
>>>> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently
>>>> giving
>>>> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is
>>>> constantly
>>>> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this
>>>> with
>>>> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he
>>>> seems
>>>> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think
>>>> that
>>>> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>>>
>>> Meh. As animals age they get sick more and more, and staying on top of
>>> it becomes very expensive and time consuming. If it were me I'd
>>> probably just let him go, considering his age, because after that's
>>> cured he's probably just going to come down with something else. Saying
>>> goodbye will be sad, but if he's 16 then he's probably going to go real
>>> soon (within a couple years) anyway. Grab the classified ads and find
>>> somebody with unwanted kittens 8-10 weeks old; grab one of those and
>>> keep it for another 16 years.
>>
>> WTF are you thinking. I have had cats live well past 20 years of age and
>> so have many others here.
>> They are worth every penny to keep on top of them.
>>
>> saving the kittens is a noble thing but letting your goes just because
>> he is sick now Man Please don't offer me any advice
>>
>
> I have noticed a number of people on this group who refer to their cats as
> "elderly" and act as if we should end all treatment when they reach "old
> age." A recent message even referred to a cat that was only 12 years old
> as if she were at the end of her life. (Holly will be 14 in June, and she
> still looks and acts like a young cat. My first cat was almost 20 when he
> died, and he had been completely healthy until 18 1/2.) Quality of life
> is what is important, not simply the totality of years. Just like human
> medicine, veterinary medicine has advanced so that cats today can live
> much longer--and healthier--lives.
>
> I really wonder if this message wasn't a troll, based on the statement to
> "grab the classified ads" and find a kitten. The cat in question is still
> alive, and hyperthyroidism is treatable!
>
> As for the OP: *Why* haven't you discussed this with your vet? That is
> the obvious (and immediate) step that needs to be taken.
>
> MaryL
>

Well said Mary My precious was almost 22 when she passed her sister was 20
her brother was 19. My mom had a cat that was well over 20 when I was
young.

I don't think she is a troll. A new poster yes for she has responded
positively to other post. I think more like a **** poor choice of words.

Ps Happy New Year and A Merry Christmas

MaryL
January 6th 09, 06:45 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
ng.com...
>
>>
>> I really wonder if this message wasn't a troll, based on the statement to
>> "grab the classified ads" and find a kitten. The cat in question is
>> still alive, and hyperthyroidism is treatable!
>>
>> As for the OP: *Why* haven't you discussed this with your vet? That is
>> the obvious (and immediate) step that needs to be taken.
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>
> I don't think she is a troll. A new poster yes for she has responded
> positively to other post. I think more like a **** poor choice of words.
>
> Ps Happy New Year and A Merry Christmas
>

Good point. Thanks!

And a Happy New Year to all of you.

MaryL

cybercat
January 6th 09, 07:48 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
> We have been to 3 vets 2 specialist every food out there has been used.
> Phantom eats no matter if he is hungry or not. There is dry food but he
> does not touch it. HE eats all the left overs of the wet food to the
> point where I have to close the door to let the girls eat.
> His hyperthyroidism is under control. HE has done this since he was a
> kitten. He eats and has to check everyone dishes and eats some of theirs.
> I STRESS AGAIN HE HAS DONE THIS FOR 15 PLUS YEARS. HE HAS BEEN TESTED FOR
> EVERYTHING.
>
> But thank you for anyone's concern.
>


Then what the **** were you asking us about? Asshole.

cybercat
January 6th 09, 07:49 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
> We have been to 3 vets 2 specialist every food out there has been used.
> Phantom eats no matter if he is hungry or not. There is dry food but he
> does not touch it. HE eats all the left overs of the wet food to the
> point where I have to close the door to let the girls eat.
> His hyperthyroidism is under control. HE has done this since he was a
> kitten. He eats and has to check everyone dishes and eats some of theirs.
> I STRESS AGAIN HE HAS DONE THIS FOR 15 PLUS YEARS. HE HAS BEEN TESTED FOR
> EVERYTHING.
>
> But thank you for anyone's concern.
>

Oops. Sorry Matthew. :) Wrong attribution.

cybercat
January 6th 09, 07:51 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>
> I really wonder if this message wasn't a troll, based on the statement to
> "grab the classified ads" and find a kitten. The cat in question is still
> alive, and hyperthyroidism is treatable!
>
> As for the OP: *Why* haven't you discussed this with your vet? That is
> the obvious (and immediate) step that needs to be taken.
>
>

Mary L., I am afraid the Stupid Population is just outrunning the Average
Intelligence Population.

I mean, this "ensoul" creature, "uhh, there are big clumps of hair all over
my house, my daughter vaaaaacuums for me but it doesn't help much, what
should I DOOOOOOOO?"

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 07:59 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> g.com...
>> We have been to 3 vets 2 specialist every food out there has been used.
>> Phantom eats no matter if he is hungry or not. There is dry food but he
>> does not touch it. HE eats all the left overs of the wet food to the
>> point where I have to close the door to let the girls eat.
>> His hyperthyroidism is under control. HE has done this since he was a
>> kitten. He eats and has to check everyone dishes and eats some of
>> theirs. I STRESS AGAIN HE HAS DONE THIS FOR 15 PLUS YEARS. HE HAS BEEN
>> TESTED FOR EVERYTHING.
>>
>> But thank you for anyone's concern.
>>
>
> Oops. Sorry Matthew. :) Wrong attribution.

I saw that and said WTF is she smoking and WTF Did I do? ;-)
I still love you :-)

cybercat
January 6th 09, 08:19 PM
"Matthew" > wrote
>> Oops. Sorry Matthew. :) Wrong attribution.
>
> I saw that and said WTF is she smoking and WTF Did I do? ;-)
> I still love you :-)
I am so glad! Talk about a dirty job! :)

Matthew[_3_]
January 6th 09, 08:28 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote
>>> Oops. Sorry Matthew. :) Wrong attribution.
>>
>> I saw that and said WTF is she smoking and WTF Did I do? ;-)
>> I still love you :-)
> I am so glad! Talk about a dirty job! :)
ROFLMAO

January 6th 09, 08:53 PM
On Jan 6, 12:20*pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:

> I really wonder if this message wasn't a troll, based on the statement to
> "grab the classified ads" and find a kitten. *The cat in question is still
> alive, and hyperthyroidism is treatable!
>
> As for the OP: **Why* haven't you discussed this with your vet? *That is the
> obvious (and immediate) step that needs to be taken.

There could be a couple of things going on.

Some people are frightened of mortality at any level, so if their
animals get sick, the fears are triggered. As much as anything else,
the call to jettison an ailing animal may be as simple as that.

Kittens are good fun and an affirmation of life and optimism. When
there are many other frightening things happening with the economy,
jobs, housing, politics, war, crime and all, fear rises - countering
that fear becomes paramount even to the point of irrational actions.

Vets are expensive. See "economy" and "fear" above. And then add yet
another fear that reaches irrational levels - *Radiation*. Fly twice
coast-to-coast. That is about the dose one might get from a cat after
such a process with a little care.

So, don't be so hard on the OP. More flies with honey than vinegar and
so forth - but certainly a nasty response will get nothing, create ill
will and close minds.

The Kitten
(Ogden Nash)

The trouble with a kitten is
THAT
Eventually it becomes a
CAT.

Sadly, pet animals for many are becoming a luxury as any survey of
west coast animal shelters will illustrate. In recent weeks, we have
had individuals here questioning the need to vaccinate older cats, now
proven radiation therapy for an older cat. There will be more and more
of this before "things get better". Just be glad that you have the
discretionary income with which to advocate the "superior moral
position". Writing for myself, with four animals between food and
vetting, Rymadil for the ancient Golden, parasite control, I expect we
pay on the order of $3,000 per year when they are in good health. Our
Scotty just used that up and more for a course of (successful so far)
of chemotherapy for lymphoma (diagnosis in that as well) over the last
10 weeks. We can afford it - many cannot. Many could once, cannot now.
There but for the grace of God - and so forth. We go on one less major
vacation, buy a few fewer toys, save a little less - others give up
the animal or don't eat.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Chris[_4_]
January 7th 09, 02:44 AM
You would have to discuss this with the doctor doing the RI procedure, and
also what you feel you are willing to do and pay for. We did it for my boy
Toby and he was 13 at the time. He lived to be 19, and he wouldn't have if
he didn't have the procedure. Back when we had it done it cost $1200, I'm
not sure if it is cheaper now. We did it at Radiocat in Illinois, they have
other facilities in the U.S. Did you know your cats parents? Did they
live to be old? We have had several cats live to be 20 and even one to
22-1/2. So it is really up to you and the doctor to discuss in my opinion.

Chris[_4_]
January 7th 09, 02:47 AM
Sharon, God help your poor cats. I've had several cats live to be 20 and
one to be 22-1/2. I'd hate to be a cat in your household... oh your
getting old, time to go.

Chris[_4_]
January 7th 09, 02:51 AM
Also I want to add, Toby was on tapazole for some time. He had side effects
like itching, he used to lick and bite the skin off himself. He was then
put on something else to get rid of that side effect (Prozac maybe) and it
stopped him from licking and biting, but then he walked around in a daze
like a zombie. That's when we decided on the RI treatment when he turned
13. He was away from us for 7 days, it was hard, but he started to gain
weight back and he lived for 7 more years very healthy.

Phil P.
January 7th 09, 10:32 AM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing.

Transdermal Tapazole dosing is unreliable and inconsistant- that's why your
cat is still sympotmatic. I think you should definitely tell your vet about
your cat's symptoms ASAP. Hyperthyroidism affects every cell in the body and
can cause damage to organs- especially the heart and eyes. If you can't pill
your cat, ask your vet for a prescription for a flavored liquid suspension
version of methimazole (genericTapazole). The flavored liquid suspension
must be compounded and is available at almost all human compounding
pharmacies.

Here are some tips on medicating a cat with pills and liquid formulations.

http://maxshouse.com/Medicating_Your_Cat.htm


Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?

At 16, your cat is at high-risk of underlying chronic renal failure (CRF).
Hyperthyroidism increases blood flow through the kidneys which makes them
look like they're healthier than they are. Before you can even consider
radioiodine treament, you must first get your cat's T4 level in the normal
range (euthyroid) with methimazole, and then assess his renal function
(BUN/creatinine levels). If your cat's kidney function remains stable or
at least acceptable after several weeks of euthyroidism, then he can
probably can be treated safely with radioiodine. If his kidney function
deteriorates while he's euthyroid, your cat probably has underlying CRF and
probably is not a good candidate for radioiodine or surgery and should
probably remain on Tapazole at a reduced dose until you strike a balance
between an "acceptable" level of hyperthyroidism and an "acceptable" level
of azotemia.

I strongly suggest you contact your vet ASAP about your cat's symptoms.

Phil

James Egan
January 9th 09, 04:59 AM
On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 09:32:13 +0000, Phil P. wrote:
>
> I strongly suggest you contact your vet ASAP about your cat's symptoms.
>
> Phil


I've had my cat to the vet who prescribed the transdermal tapazole. I
have another appointment scheduled next week for blood tests, which are a
prerequisite for the radio iodine therapy. I'm hoping he's able to get
the therapy. If not, I'll see what the vet suggests.

-Thanks

James Egan
January 9th 09, 05:01 AM
On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 19:44:56 -0600, Chris wrote:

> You would have to discuss this with the doctor doing the RI procedure, and
> also what you feel you are willing to do and pay for. We did it for my boy
> Toby and he was 13 at the time. He lived to be 19, and he wouldn't have if
> he didn't have the procedure. Back when we had it done it cost $1200, I'm
> not sure if it is cheaper now. We did it at Radiocat in Illinois, they have
> other facilities in the U.S. Did you know your cats parents? Did they
> live to be old? We have had several cats live to be 20 and even one to
> 22-1/2. So it is really up to you and the doctor to discuss in my opinion.


No, I don't know who the parents were. The procedure costs $1,000,
excluding the preliminary blood tests. I'm hoping he's able to have the
iodine therapy.

-Thanks

James Egan
January 9th 09, 05:03 AM
On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 09:09:04 -0700, Sharon wrote:
> Meh. As animals age they get sick more and more, and staying on top of
> it becomes very expensive and time consuming. If it were me I'd
> probably just let him go, considering his age, because after that's
> cured he's probably just going to come down with something else. Saying
> goodbye will be sad, but if he's 16 then he's probably going to go real
> soon (within a couple years) anyway. Grab the classified ads and find
> somebody with unwanted kittens 8-10 weeks old; grab one of those and
> keep it for another 16 years.


This isn't a cell phone upgrade we're talking about here. My two cats are
part of the family! They're not something to be discarded for a new
model. Good grief.

cybercat
January 9th 09, 05:20 AM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 09:09:04 -0700, Sharon wrote:
>> Meh. As animals age they get sick more and more, and staying on top of
>> it becomes very expensive and time consuming. If it were me I'd
>> probably just let him go, considering his age, because after that's
>> cured he's probably just going to come down with something else. Saying
>> goodbye will be sad, but if he's 16 then he's probably going to go real
>> soon (within a couple years) anyway. Grab the classified ads and find
>> somebody with unwanted kittens 8-10 weeks old; grab one of those and
>> keep it for another 16 years.
>
>
> This isn't a cell phone upgrade we're talking about here. My two cats are
> part of the family! They're not something to be discarded for a new
> model. Good grief.
>

Nicely said. Let us know how it works out.

Chris[_4_]
January 9th 09, 06:24 AM
yes please keep in touch with us, let us know if you go ahead with the
procedure, and how your cat is doing after it

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
January 11th 09, 09:20 PM
"James Egan" > wrote in message
...
> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?


Tapazole is cheap and very effective. A 16 year old cat is a bad candidate
for radioactive iodine. I had a HT cat for years and the pills were a
non-issue. One in the morning and one in the evening for 4 years was no
trouble. My vet says that the fatality rate from the radiation treatment is
too high. She says they have sent young and healthy cats off for the
treatment and within a week of coming home they die suddenly. For a senior
citizen like yours the pills are the only way to go IMO. The pills will
stop the problem completely. If he still has symptoms he needs a larger
does. Sooner the better so he does not develop cardiomyopathy.

Paul

cybercat
January 11th 09, 09:22 PM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote
> My vet says that the fatality rate from the radiation treatment is too
> high.

I have never heard this. I suspect this is a load of horse poo.

Chris[_4_]
January 12th 09, 01:25 AM
Never heard of it either, maybe he's a Tapazole drug rep ;)

Chris[_4_]
January 12th 09, 01:31 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote
> Tapazole is cheap and very effective. The pills will stop the problem
> completely. If he still has symptoms he needs a larger does. Sooner the
> better so he does not develop cardiomyopathy.



They may be cheap and effective, but not effective for every patient.
Tapazole can cause from freaky side effects like intense thirst and
itching. This was the case with my 13 year old cat. Then the doc
put Toby on Prozac, which stopped the Tapazole side effects, but
then he was a zombie cat. He had RI and it worked wonders.
One should always try medication before the RI treatment, absolutely.
16 years old might be too old, the OP needs to discuss it with his vet,
but also with who would be doing the RI treatment. A vet might push
the meds ($$$) the RI place might push the treatment ($$$). You just
never know who to trust, you have to trust your gut.

Ham & Cheese
January 12th 09, 07:45 AM
"cybercat" > wrote:

>
>"Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>> My vet says that the fatality rate from the radiation treatment is too
>> high.
>
>I have never heard this. I suspect this is a load of horse poo.
>

Totally agree - rubbish!

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
January 12th 09, 12:58 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>> My vet says that the fatality rate from the radiation treatment is too
>> high.
>
> I have never heard this. I suspect this is a load of horse poo. \

Because YOU are a pathetic piece of horse **** and YOU are projecting.
AGAIN.

You're a ****ing god damn IDIOT.

My vet has decades of experience and DOES NOT send SENIOR cats to RI
treatment because THEY DIE.

God but you are an insufferable asshole. You don't know jack **** and you
would do everyone a favor by shutting your trap.

I stand behind what I said. RI is NOT as safe as they let you think. It
has a fatality rate that is not common knowledge. So if my vet says NO to
RI you're going to have to dig deep into your paranoid brain to come up with
any motivation, especially financial.

Paul

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
January 12th 09, 01:00 PM
"Chris" > wrote in message
...
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>> Tapazole is cheap and very effective. The pills will stop the problem
>> completely. If he still has symptoms he needs a larger does. Sooner the
>> better so he does not develop cardiomyopathy.
>
>
>
> They may be cheap and effective, but not effective for every patient.
> Tapazole can cause from freaky side effects like intense thirst and
> itching. This was the case with my 13 year old cat. Then the doc
> put Toby on Prozac, which stopped the Tapazole side effects, but
> then he was a zombie cat. He had RI and it worked wonders.
> One should always try medication before the RI treatment, absolutely.
> 16 years old might be too old, the OP needs to discuss it with his vet,
> but also with who would be doing the RI treatment. A vet might push
> the meds ($$$) the RI place might push the treatment ($$$). You just
> never know who to trust, you have to trust your gut.

A vet gets jack from the RI because they don't do it. At some point you
have to shed the paranoia and actually accept that your vet may have your
cats best interst in mind and is not out to **** you out of some money.
Perhaps if you do your animals may have a fighting chance at living through
your stupidity.

Paul

Paul M. Cook[_2_]
January 12th 09, 01:17 PM
"Chris" > wrote in message
...
> Never heard of it either, maybe he's a Tapazole drug rep ;)

Oh that's so funny. You have a vet who makes not a dime off RI and who does
not make any money off tapazole because all she does is write a prescription
for you to get filled someplace else. So tell me, Einstein, just what the
****ing hell is the motivation here? Just what mativation have you divined
here? Care to clue us in, genius?

I got news for you, not everyone is out to **** you. OK? Some actually have
the best interest of your animal at heart despite your every effort to kill
it off. To dismiss an expert because your lack of knowledge and ignorance
rule your brain is just the tactic of a fool.

If the poster was smart, he'd ask his vet about it and get a second opinion
as well. With ****heads like you around let us pray he has enough
intelligence to recognize and idiot.

Paul

cybercat
January 12th 09, 05:06 PM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>>> My vet says that the fatality rate from the radiation treatment is too
>>> high.
>>
>> I have never heard this. I suspect this is a load of horse poo. \
>
> Because YOU are a pathetic piece of horse **** and YOU are projecting.
> AGAIN.
>
> You're a ****ing god damn IDIOT.
>
> My vet has decades of experience and DOES NOT send SENIOR cats to RI
> treatment because THEY DIE.
>
> God but you are an insufferable asshole. You don't know jack **** and you
> would do everyone a favor by shutting your trap.
>
> I stand behind what I said. RI is NOT as safe as they let you think. It
> has a fatality rate that is not common knowledge. So if my vet says NO to
> RI you're going to have to dig deep into your paranoid brain to come up
> with any motivation, especially financial.
>

Feel better now, Paul? Meanwhile, there are no appreciable health risks for
healthy cats, even older cats, with radioactive iodine treatments. Your vet
is wrong, or, more likely, your interpretation of your vet's comments is
wrong. As the above goes a lonng way to show, you are not the brightest bulb
in the pack. HTH. HAND.

cybercat
January 12th 09, 05:06 PM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote
>>> My vet says that the fatality rate from the radiation treatment is too
>>> high.
>>
>> I have never heard this. I suspect this is a load of horse poo. \
>
> Because YOU are a pathetic piece of horse **** and YOU are projecting.
> AGAIN.
>
> You're a ****ing god damn IDIOT.
>
> My vet has decades of experience and DOES NOT send SENIOR cats to RI
> treatment because THEY DIE.
>
> God but you are an insufferable asshole. You don't know jack **** and you
> would do everyone a favor by shutting your trap.
>
> I stand behind what I said. RI is NOT as safe as they let you think. It
> has a fatality rate that is not common knowledge. So if my vet says NO to
> RI you're going to have to dig deep into your paranoid brain to come up
> with any motivation, especially financial.
>
> Paul
>

D. K. Kraft[_2_]
January 12th 09, 09:12 PM
With patience akin to a cat's, James Egan, on 1/5/2009 7:46 PM typed:
> My sister-in-law's cat had hyperthyroidism, and she had the radio iodine
> treatment performed, and now her cat is completely healed. I'm
> considering the treatment for my cat, but he's 16. I'm currently giving
> him tapazole in his ears. He's still very thin though, and is constantly
> thirsty, which are symptoms of the disease. I haven't discussed this with
> my vet yet, or taken my cat for testing. Other than being thin, he seems
> happy and in high spirits. His appetite is enormous! Do you think that
> 16 is too old for the radio iodine procedure?
>
> -Thanks
>

James, I'm fortunate enough to live very close to the Feline Hyperthyroid
Treatment Center in Shoreline, WA, and both my cats have been successfully
treated with radioiodine, my oldest at 14 and my youngest at 12. With my oldest
cat, my current vet tried him on methimizole first, which was a disaster: his
T4 wasn't monstrously high, but it was very stubborn, requiring ever increasing
dosages of the drug that only served to make Josh vomit more frequently. Being
able to treat him with radioiodine therapy was a fantastic thing for his health.

One of the required screening tests at the FHTC is to make sure a cat's kidney
function hasn't become impaired and that a cat isn't showing signs of renal
insufficiency. Such a cat would not be a good candidate for radioiodine
therapy, as clearing the I131 isotope would place too great a load on already
compromised kidneys.

The FHTC has a great web FAQ that should help to answer many of your questions.
It's also possible that Dr. Wackerbarth could assist you in finding a
recommended treatment center in your area. Go here for the FHTC FAQ:
http://www.felinehtc.com/site/view/57409_Faq.pml The website also has other
info that should help in your investigation of I131 treatment.

Good luck to you and your furry companion --
--
/\ /\ |
^o o^ D.K. "Cat" Kraft | "One cat just leads to another."
->T<- |
~ Lynnwood, WA | -- Ernest Hemingway
___oOO___OOo___ |

Chris[_4_]
January 13th 09, 02:17 AM
Wow Paul, you are a real potty mouth jerk. You must be very proud of
yourself.

cybercat
January 13th 09, 05:10 AM
"Chris" > wrote in message
...
> Wow Paul, you are a real potty mouth jerk. You must be very proud of
> yourself.
>

He's also WRONG. The biggest drawback to radioactive iodine treatment for
healthy hypherthyroid cats (OF ANY AGE) is the separation from their owners,
which is mandated by laws governing radioactive waste, which differ from
state to state. I know this because our cat Boo was diagnosed at age 11, had
an ultrasound of her heart, was okayed despite heart disease, but did not
get the treatment because we thought it would be too hard on her (and we
knew it would be too hard on us) to be quarantined at the vet's for two
weeks. Paul demonstrates a bonehead's view of the procedure. It is not even
dangerous for humans. (My mother went through it in the 1970s.) Radioactive
iodine is injected into the bloodstream. Iodine of any kind goes straight to
the thyroid gland, in cats, humans, and other mammals. The radioactivity
kills the overgrowth of the gland.

Boo is now 14 and fine, but hates being pilled.

Best to be easy on Paul, though. It has to be hard being wrong and
hystrionic at the same time.