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Janet
January 17th 09, 02:16 AM
I'm considering moving the cat's box to the cellar in order to keep the dog
out of it. The box is currently on the 2nd floor of the house. The cellar
door would have to be left ajar in order to let the cat have free access,
but I'm 90% certain the dog would not go down there. The cat, on the other
hand, enjoys going down cellar and hunting around.

I have a covered box with a swinging door, but for the last month or so the
door keeps getting knocked off, by cat or dog I'm not sure. What I am sure
of is that when the door is off, the dog is sticking her head in the catbox
and eating the cat's poop, which a) has obvious possible health
ramifications given that there is clumping litter on it, and b) scatters
litter all over the place and drives me nuts.

I'm wondering if it would be sufficient to just move the box and take the
cat down to see where it is, or whether people have found that cats have a
hard time remembering the new location. (Cat accidents I do not need!)

Spot[_2_]
January 17th 09, 03:44 AM
I would put in a second box and once I was sure he was using it removing the
first one. Or you could put up a gate like we did with a hold cut into it
for the cat to slip through.

Celeste


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"Janet" > wrote in message
...
> I'm considering moving the cat's box to the cellar in order to keep the
> dog out of it. The box is currently on the 2nd floor of the house. The
> cellar door would have to be left ajar in order to let the cat have free
> access, but I'm 90% certain the dog would not go down there. The cat, on
> the other hand, enjoys going down cellar and hunting around.
>
> I have a covered box with a swinging door, but for the last month or so
> the door keeps getting knocked off, by cat or dog I'm not sure. What I am
> sure of is that when the door is off, the dog is sticking her head in the
> catbox and eating the cat's poop, which a) has obvious possible health
> ramifications given that there is clumping litter on it, and b) scatters
> litter all over the place and drives me nuts.
>
> I'm wondering if it would be sufficient to just move the box and take the
> cat down to see where it is, or whether people have found that cats have a
> hard time remembering the new location. (Cat accidents I do not need!)
>
>
>

Angela[_2_]
January 17th 09, 06:26 PM
"Spot" > wrote in message
...
|I would put in a second box and once I was sure he was using it removing
the
| first one. Or you could put up a gate like we did with a hold cut into it
| for the cat to slip through.
|
| Celeste

Or raise the tray up out of the dogs reach

jmc
January 18th 09, 02:13 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Janet exclaimed (1/16/2009 9:16 PM):
> I'm considering moving the cat's box to the cellar in order to keep the dog
> out of it. The box is currently on the 2nd floor of the house. The cellar
> door would have to be left ajar in order to let the cat have free access,
> but I'm 90% certain the dog would not go down there. The cat, on the other
> hand, enjoys going down cellar and hunting around.
>
> I have a covered box with a swinging door, but for the last month or so the
> door keeps getting knocked off, by cat or dog I'm not sure. What I am sure
> of is that when the door is off, the dog is sticking her head in the catbox
> and eating the cat's poop, which a) has obvious possible health
> ramifications given that there is clumping litter on it, and b) scatters
> litter all over the place and drives me nuts.
>
> I'm wondering if it would be sufficient to just move the box and take the
> cat down to see where it is, or whether people have found that cats have a
> hard time remembering the new location. (Cat accidents I do not need!)
>
>
>

Have you considered treating your dog's pica (eating inappropriate
things, I think) instead? I think there's something you add to their
food, that makes non-food items like cat poop no longer interesting.

jmc

Janet
January 18th 09, 04:10 AM
jmc wrote:
>
> Have you considered treating your dog's pica (eating inappropriate
> things, I think) instead? I think there's something you add to their
> food, that makes non-food items like cat poop no longer interesting.
>
> jmc

There is a difference between pica (eating all kinds of non-food things) and
copraphagia (eating poop). My dog doesn't have generalized pica, but
sometimes exhibits copraphagia. My dog doesn't have any of the usual reasons
for poop-eating, except nervousness, and in her case that is caused by bad
genetics (puppy mill or BYB) and a bad upbringing by the people who dumped
her in the shelter. There really isn't much that we can do about that that
we haven't already done. If the problem is the dog eating its own poop you
can put something on their food that makes the poop taste bad. That's not
the problem here.

The best solution is to put the box somewhere where the dog can't get at it.
Height is not an option, nor is gating it off. I may try wedging the door to
the room just far enough open for the cat to get in, but not the dog. Either
that or putting the cat box in the cellar.

jmc
January 18th 09, 04:25 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Janet exclaimed (1/17/2009 11:10 PM):
> jmc wrote:
>> Have you considered treating your dog's pica (eating inappropriate
>> things, I think) instead? I think there's something you add to their
>> food, that makes non-food items like cat poop no longer interesting.
>>
>> jmc
>
> There is a difference between pica (eating all kinds of non-food things) and
> copraphagia (eating poop). My dog doesn't have generalized pica, but
> sometimes exhibits copraphagia. My dog doesn't have any of the usual reasons
> for poop-eating, except nervousness, and in her case that is caused by bad
> genetics (puppy mill or BYB) and a bad upbringing by the people who dumped
> her in the shelter. There really isn't much that we can do about that that
> we haven't already done. If the problem is the dog eating its own poop you
> can put something on their food that makes the poop taste bad. That's not
> the problem here.
>
> The best solution is to put the box somewhere where the dog can't get at it.
> Height is not an option, nor is gating it off. I may try wedging the door to
> the room just far enough open for the cat to get in, but not the dog. Either
> that or putting the cat box in the cellar.
>
>

You're right. I forgot about copraphagia. It's a type of pica, is it
not? Maybe you can feed the kitties that stuff that you feed the dog,
to make the kitty's poo taste bad.

Hmmm. Perhaps put the litterbox in a larger solid container of some
sort (like a cabinet), that has the entrance hole too high up for the
dog to be able to reach down to grab the poo?

jmc

Rene S.
January 19th 09, 09:23 PM
I would be cautious of moving a box to such a radical location. Do you
have a closet where you can prop the door open 6" or so using a door
stop, so the cat can get in but the dog can't?

There are also "designer" covers you can buy for litter boxes (ones
that look like plant stands or a piece of furniture), if you so
prefer. IMHO, it's much cheaper and easier to try a closet first.

news[_2_]
January 20th 09, 03:51 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Janet exclaimed (1/17/2009 11:10 PM):
>> jmc wrote:
>>> Have you considered treating your dog's pica (eating inappropriate
>>> things, I think) instead? I think there's something you add to their
>>> food, that makes non-food items like cat poop no longer interesting.
>>>
>>> jmc
>>
>> There is a difference between pica (eating all kinds of non-food things)
>> and copraphagia (eating poop). My dog doesn't have generalized pica, but
>> sometimes exhibits copraphagia. My dog doesn't have any of the usual
>> reasons for poop-eating, except nervousness, and in her case that is
>> caused by bad genetics (puppy mill or BYB) and a bad upbringing by the
>> people who dumped her in the shelter. There really isn't much that we can
>> do about that that we haven't already done. If the problem is the dog
>> eating its own poop you can put something on their food that makes the
>> poop taste bad. That's not the problem here.
>>
>> The best solution is to put the box somewhere where the dog can't get at
>> it. Height is not an option, nor is gating it off. I may try wedging the
>> door to the room just far enough open for the cat to get in, but not the
>> dog. Either that or putting the cat box in the cellar.
>
> You're right. I forgot about copraphagia. It's a type of pica, is it not?
> Maybe you can feed the kitties that stuff that you feed the dog, to make
> the kitty's poo taste bad.

Like cat poop tastes good? Hehe. Dogs that like to eat cat poop will go out
of their way to get it. When we had a dog and several cats, the dog was
addicted to cat poop ,aka Kitty Nonpareils. I asked the vet about it and he
said that dogs think of it as pre-digested dinner food. Cats have a diet
consisting almost entirely of meat products, so dogs smell cat poop and
think "MEAT!"

One of our cats was elderly and we have no basement so we used two baby
gates (the dog, a Pug, could climb over just one) and left a gap at the
bottom so the cats could squeeze under.
You can't trust a dog who develops a taste for cat poop, and making it
inaccessible is preferable to dietary manipulation.
If the dog wants it bad enough, he will go down the cellar stairs!

>
> Hmmm. Perhaps put the litterbox in a larger solid container of some sort
> (like a cabinet), that has the entrance hole too high up for the dog to be
> able to reach down to grab the poo?
>
> jmc
>