PDA

View Full Version : Cat disease(s) similar to FIP?


January 17th 09, 07:09 PM
Hello experts,

My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
(!) months ago. We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
two months ago, 450 ml this week).

Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
diagnosed? Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?


Thanks,


Fred D.

kat
January 18th 09, 01:25 PM
> wrote in message
...
> Hello experts,
>
> My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
> (!) months ago. We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
> two months ago, 450 ml this week).
>
> Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> diagnosed? Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Fred D.

My daughter's cat has a possible FIP diagnosis. I've been researching that
and other possible dx for the last week and I found these two places to be
helpful for FIP info. Don't know if you are familiar with them but they are
www.catvirus.com
and www.pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/FIP .

Kathy

Candace
January 18th 09, 08:57 PM
On Jan 17, 11:09*am, wrote:
> Hello experts,
>
> My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
> (!) months ago. *We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
> two months ago, 450 ml this week).
>
> Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> diagnosed? *Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Fred D.

Is it her abdomen or her chest cavity where the fluid is? You said
both in your post. I know there are other diseases that cause fluid
accumulation in the pleural cavity...pneumothorax and chylothorax, for
instance, although chylothorax produces a pinkish fluid. I'm not sure
what color pneumothorax produces. I would think there are other
reasons why your vet thinks it is FIP than the fluid accumulation,
correct?

I hope your cat recovers...How does she feel?

Candace

Candace
January 18th 09, 09:12 PM
On Jan 18, 5:25*am, "kat" > wrote:
> > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > Hello experts,
>
> > My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
> > (!) months ago. *We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
> > two months ago, 450 ml this week).
>
> > Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> > diagnosed? *Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> > accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?
>
> > Thanks,
>
> > Fred D.
>
> My daughter's cat has a possible FIP diagnosis. *I've been researching that
> and other possible dx for the last week and I found these two places to be
> helpful for FIP info. *Don't know if you are familiar with them but they arewww.catvirus.com
> andwww.pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/FIP.
>
> Kathy

From this website, question below:

http://www.thecatconnection.com/care/fip.htm

Q. My cat has FIP. How long can it be expected to live? How can I make
my cat comfortable during its last days?
A. Once clinical signs appear, cats with the effusive (wet) form of
FIP will live a few days to a few weeks, although some adult cats may
linger for six to eight months.

Candace
January 18th 09, 09:14 PM
On Jan 17, 11:09*am, wrote:
> Hello experts,
>
> My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
> (!) months ago. *We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
> two months ago, 450 ml this week).
>
> Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> diagnosed? *Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Fred D.

Is it her abdomen or her chest cavity where the fluid is? You said
both in your post. I know there are other diseases that cause fluid
accumulation in the pleural cavity...pneumothorax and chylothorax, for
instance, although chylothorax produces a pinkish fluid. I'm not sure
what color pneumothorax produces. I would think there are other
reasons why your vet thinks it is FIP than the fluid accumulation,
correct?

I hope your cat recovers...How does she feel?

Candace

kat
January 19th 09, 02:49 PM
"Candace" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 18, 5:25 am, "kat" > wrote:
> > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > Hello experts,
>
> > My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
> > (!) months ago. We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
> > two months ago, 450 ml this week).
>
> > Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> > diagnosed? Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> > accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?
>
> > Thanks,
>
> > Fred D.
>
> My daughter's cat has a possible FIP diagnosis. I've been researching that
> and other possible dx for the last week and I found these two places to be
> helpful for FIP info. Don't know if you are familiar with them but they
arewww.catvirus.com
> andwww.pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/FIP.
>
> Kathy

From this website, question below:

http://www.thecatconnection.com/care/fip.htm

Q. My cat has FIP. How long can it be expected to live? How can I make
my cat comfortable during its last days?
A. Once clinical signs appear, cats with the effusive (wet) form of
FIP will live a few days to a few weeks, although some adult cats may
linger for six to eight months.


Great link, I'm always looking for more places to gather info.

My daughter's cat had fluid in the lungs themselves which to my (limited)
understading of FIP is not a normal sign. Rather fluid in the chest cavity
or abdomen. His A:G ratio was .03 and his
Total Protein and globulin levels were high which is what I suspect led to
the possible FIP diagnosis. I did read on another site that possible causes
of both high protein and high globulin levels could be the result of
dehydration. They gave him IV fluids during his hospital stay. His FCoV was
negative but maybe it was a false negative. His lymph nodes are enlarged and
he is losing weight. We are taking him to a different vet on Wed. who will
hopefully do some ultrasounds (not sure which ones would be most beneficial)
and make a more definitive diagnosis.

Kathy

Candace
January 20th 09, 01:47 AM
On Jan 19, 6:49*am, "kat" > wrote:
> "Candace" > wrote in message
>
> ...
> On Jan 18, 5:25 am, "kat" > wrote:
>
>
>
> > > wrote in message
>
> ....
>
> > > Hello experts,
>
> > > My cat has been diagnosed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis almost 5
> > > (!) months ago. We had fluid removed from her abdomen twice (500 ml
> > > two months ago, 450 ml this week).
>
> > > Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> > > diagnosed? Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> > > accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?
>
> > > Thanks,
>
> > > Fred D.
>
> > My daughter's cat has a possible FIP diagnosis. I've been researching that
> > and other possible dx for the last week and I found these two places to be
> > helpful for FIP info. Don't know if you are familiar with them but they
> arewww.catvirus.com
> > andwww.pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/FIP.
>
> > Kathy
>
> From this website, question below:
>
> http://www.thecatconnection.com/care/fip.htm
>
> Q. My cat has FIP. How long can it be expected to live? How can I make
> my cat comfortable during its last days?
> A. Once clinical signs appear, cats with the effusive (wet) form of
> FIP will live a few days to a few weeks, although some adult cats may
> linger for six to eight months.
>
> Great link, I'm always looking for more places to gather info.
>
> My daughter's cat had fluid in the lungs themselves which to my (limited)
> understading of FIP is not a normal sign. *Rather fluid in the chest cavity
> or abdomen. *His A:G ratio was .03 and his
> Total *Protein and globulin levels were high which is what I suspect led to
> the possible FIP diagnosis. *I did read on another site that possible causes
> of both high protein and high globulin levels could be the result of
> dehydration. They gave him IV fluids during his hospital stay. *His FCoV was
> negative but maybe it was a false negative. His lymph nodes are enlarged and
> he is losing weight. *We are taking him to a different vet on Wed. who will
> hopefully do some ultrasounds (not sure which ones would be most beneficial)
> and make a more definitive diagnosis.
>
> Kathy

I hope the news is much better than you fear. Please keep us posted.

Candace

January 21st 09, 02:01 PM
On Jan 17, 1:09*pm, wrote:

> Is it often seen that a cat stays alive so long after being
> diagnosed? *Is there some other disease(s) that can cause yellow fluid
> accumulation in the chest and be mistaken as FIP?

More than you care to know, but the short answer is that cats can live
a very long time with the virus until it is triggered by some stresser
- and then they may get over it, or die of it. And the dying may be 48
hours to several months depending on a range of external and internal
factors.


http://www.vetscite.org/issue1/reviews/txt_index_0800.htm

Note that the virus is persistent for several weeks outside the
animal, that it is transmitted (cat to cat) via contact with fluids
and excreta -and *NOT* by direct infection, that you could be a
carrier of such fluids or excreta to other environments and other
cats, that your cat will be shedding contagens via fluids and excreta
continuously. So, be very, very careful in your care of your cat and
its (and your) exposure to other cats during this process. And before
you bring another cat into your environment, be sure to pretty much
sterilze everything your present cat used and give it a few months
just to be sure.

A more simple description of FIP and the potential for immunization is
given here:

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/brochures/fip.html

This is a very nasty disease when it becomes active. Happily, even
cats carrying the virus may live entirely normal lives and never show
the disease. But that is no reason to expose uninfected cats to the
virus. Further, it does seem that infection with several different
versions of the virus makes it far more likely that the cat will
actually develop the disease. Unhappily, if people do not know that
their cats are carriers, they may inadvertently expose other cats to
additional versions of the virus - with unfortunate results.

Lesson to be taken from this: Have your kittens, even your rescues
screened for the virus. If they have it, they should remain as single
cats - or get two from the same litter if you want companion cats.

A human analogy to this is Shingles - a version of Chicken Pox - most
all of us have had chicken pox, some of us will develop shingles.
Sometimes repeatedly, sometimes only once. The virus remains dormant -
or not - depending on other stressers, internal or external.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA