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January 23rd 09, 01:25 PM
Our tuxedo cat, Oreo, seems to be addicted to licking plastic, in
particular, polyethelene used in plastic bags and packaging.

Why? What does she get out of it?

Is this dangerous to her health??

Just wanna know...

Jerry

Rene S.
January 23rd 09, 02:48 PM
Some cats seem to really love the taste of plastic. I had heard once
that fish emulsion was used in the process of plastic making, but I've
never been able to confirm that.

I would not take the chance of her ingesting plastic, even by licking
it. Many chemicals are used in the plastic-making business, most of
which are toxic. Play it safe and stash all plastic bags and
packaging. If she really wants a bag, give her a paper bag (handles
removed) to play i n. :-)

DWMeowMix
January 23rd 09, 03:11 PM
On Jan 23, 6:25*am, wrote:
> Our tuxedo cat, Oreo, seems to be addicted to licking plastic, in
> particular, polyethelene used in plastic bags and packaging.
>
> Why? *What does she get out of it?
>
> Is this dangerous to her health??
>
> Just wanna know...
>
> Jerry

If you find out let me know! My Yota (female also) can't get enough
of licking my leather couch and chewing on my CPAP machine tubing.
Maybe it's a girl thing....

Debbie

January 23rd 09, 03:13 PM
On Jan 23, 8:25*am, wrote:
> Our tuxedo cat, Oreo, seems to be addicted to licking plastic, in
> particular, polyethelene used in plastic bags and packaging.
>
> Why? *What does she get out of it?
>
> Is this dangerous to her health??
>
> Just wanna know...
>
> Jerry

Some of the secondary packaging (peanuts & wrappings) are made with
cornstarch and gelatin or egg-protein. Some plastics are also mixed in
with various organic materials so that they will (eventually) degrade
in sunlight, with water. Some plastics are re-cycled from who-knows-
where after containing who-knows-what, and some of that 'what' is
included in it. All of which can be attractive to a bored cat, or a
cat on a limited diet ('limited NOT meaning 'bad', but possibly
without enough variety-of-texture for them). Try putting out kitty-
greens, or sprouting some popcorn in a pot and see if your cat does
not go for them instead of the plastic. And a little bit of fresh
catnip once in a while helps too.

In any case, none of it is safe to eat for you, your pets or anything
else. The soluble peanuts are good garden-mulch - *if* you know their
provenance, but that does not make them edible - or even lickable.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA