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March 5th 09, 09:58 PM
Lots of stuff recently suggesting that some Vets are better than
others - Surprise, surprise.

Here are a few suggestions on choosing a Vet. Possibly even several
Vets - for different reasons.

1. Although bedside manner is important, remember that it is the
animal that is being treated - not you. How does the Vet behave
towards your animal? Does he/she show confidence? Does the Vet pay
careful attention to the animal? If not, find another one.
2. Remember that your pet cannot speak. *YOU* are its advocate, and
often what you say may be the difference between life and death for
your pet. So, be accurate, give complete descriptions and supply every
possible detail you can. And here is the point - your Vet should be
ASKING MANY QUESTIONS - especially on a first or emergency visit. If
your vet does not ask these questions (unless the condition is obvious
such as visible trauma or physical injury), find another one.

3. Your Vet must not be afraid of your pet. Cautions about a
frightened cat lashing out with long claws is one thing, but fearful
is something entirely else. If your Vet shows fear, find another one.

4. Your Vet should give you a running commentary on what is happening,
what he/she is observing, why certain things are being done and what
is the expected result as compared to the actual. Again, the use of a
rectal or aural thermometer is pretty obvious, but sometimes when he
is thumping or palpating or stretching a limb he should be telling you
why.

5. If the Vet asks for test, the reason for all of them should be very
clearly stated.

6. Treatments - should be carefully explained with an (approximate)
duration and expectation for results. Drug treatments should be
exceedingly carefully explained including interactions, side-effects,
purpose, what happens if there is an allergic reaction, or if a pill
is thrown up or missed, how the pill is to be given and even a
specific demonstration on how to do so suitable for your abilities.
For example, our vet will supply a 'pill gun' for free for their
elderly, disabled or otherwise limited owners and demonstrate its use
with placebo pills, including letting the owner do so on one of their
'house' animals (suffice it to say that the office cat and office dog
have an excellent sense of humor).

7. If there is a dangerous, difficult or risky treatment to be done
but does not require sterile conditions - chemotherapy for example -
your Vet should be there the entire time, invite you to be there and
*NOT* leave it to a Tech.

7a: Which leads to your Vet allowing you to observe any treatment or
procedure that does not require sterile conditions and does not put
you at risk.

8. Follow up: If there has been a non-routine treatment or a
prescription given, your Vet should follow up at appropriate intervals
as to how the treatment is going, or how the animal is doing
afterwards.

* Not all good surgeons are good diagnosticians.
* Not all good diagnosticians are good surgeons.
* Good diagnosticians are also good empaths.
* Also true of good surgeons.
* It is not necessary for you to like your Vet, or for your Vet to
like you. It is necessary for your Vet to like your pet and for your
pet to like your Vet. And a good Vet (see "empath") can make this
happen in short order. When you observe it, treasure it.

We have gone to the same practice for 27 years, and in some cases have
stuck with the same individuals for that same time. There is one Vet
at the practice whom I have observed pick up damaged, terrified
animals which are lashing out at everything around them - with just a
few words he gets them calm and able to be handled. Amazingly, he
still has all his fingers. That is an example of an Empath. I have
also seen him lash into irresponsible owners and get them to respond
in the correct, necessary way without alienating them at the end of
the process.

There is another individual there who could do neurosurgery with a
dull chisel, she is so skillful. And when she is with a patient
*NOTHING* else exists in her universe but that animal - its owners are
its voicebox and historians - but only the animal is 'in focus'.

Those two are our primary choices.

Please feel free to add and comment.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Poe
March 6th 09, 02:27 AM
wrote:
> Lots of stuff recently suggesting that some Vets are better than
> others - Surprise, surprise.
>
> Here are a few suggestions on choosing a Vet. Possibly even several
> Vets - for different reasons.
>
> 1. Although bedside manner is important, remember that it is the
> animal that is being treated - not you. How does the Vet behave
> towards your animal? Does he/she show confidence? Does the Vet pay
> careful attention to the animal? If not, find another one.
> 2. Remember that your pet cannot speak. *YOU* are its advocate, and
> often what you say may be the difference between life and death for
> your pet. So, be accurate, give complete descriptions and supply every
> possible detail you can. And here is the point - your Vet should be
> ASKING MANY QUESTIONS - especially on a first or emergency visit. If
> your vet does not ask these questions (unless the condition is obvious
> such as visible trauma or physical injury), find another one.
>
> 3. Your Vet must not be afraid of your pet. Cautions about a
> frightened cat lashing out with long claws is one thing, but fearful
> is something entirely else. If your Vet shows fear, find another one.
>
> 4. Your Vet should give you a running commentary on what is happening,
> what he/she is observing, why certain things are being done and what
> is the expected result as compared to the actual. Again, the use of a
> rectal or aural thermometer is pretty obvious, but sometimes when he
> is thumping or palpating or stretching a limb he should be telling you
> why.
>
> 5. If the Vet asks for test, the reason for all of them should be very
> clearly stated.
>
> 6. Treatments - should be carefully explained with an (approximate)
> duration and expectation for results. Drug treatments should be
> exceedingly carefully explained including interactions, side-effects,
> purpose, what happens if there is an allergic reaction, or if a pill
> is thrown up or missed, how the pill is to be given and even a
> specific demonstration on how to do so suitable for your abilities.
> For example, our vet will supply a 'pill gun' for free for their
> elderly, disabled or otherwise limited owners and demonstrate its use
> with placebo pills, including letting the owner do so on one of their
> 'house' animals (suffice it to say that the office cat and office dog
> have an excellent sense of humor).
>
> 7. If there is a dangerous, difficult or risky treatment to be done
> but does not require sterile conditions - chemotherapy for example -
> your Vet should be there the entire time, invite you to be there and
> *NOT* leave it to a Tech.
>
> 7a: Which leads to your Vet allowing you to observe any treatment or
> procedure that does not require sterile conditions and does not put
> you at risk.
>
> 8. Follow up: If there has been a non-routine treatment or a
> prescription given, your Vet should follow up at appropriate intervals
> as to how the treatment is going, or how the animal is doing
> afterwards.
>
> * Not all good surgeons are good diagnosticians.
> * Not all good diagnosticians are good surgeons.
> * Good diagnosticians are also good empaths.
> * Also true of good surgeons.
> * It is not necessary for you to like your Vet, or for your Vet to
> like you. It is necessary for your Vet to like your pet and for your
> pet to like your Vet. And a good Vet (see "empath") can make this
> happen in short order. When you observe it, treasure it.
>
> We have gone to the same practice for 27 years, and in some cases have
> stuck with the same individuals for that same time. There is one Vet
> at the practice whom I have observed pick up damaged, terrified
> animals which are lashing out at everything around them - with just a
> few words he gets them calm and able to be handled. Amazingly, he
> still has all his fingers. That is an example of an Empath. I have
> also seen him lash into irresponsible owners and get them to respond
> in the correct, necessary way without alienating them at the end of
> the process.
>
> There is another individual there who could do neurosurgery with a
> dull chisel, she is so skillful. And when she is with a patient
> *NOTHING* else exists in her universe but that animal - its owners are
> its voicebox and historians - but only the animal is 'in focus'.
>
> Those two are our primary choices.
>
> Please feel free to add and comment.
>
> Peter Wieck
> Melrose Park, PA


Thanks Peter. I am new around here, so don't know that much about you,
but from what I've read you add a ton of value (for lack of a better way
of saying it). I find I re-read your postings several times because they
contain so much information, and in an objective way.